Tag Archives: Yuri Kozyrev

TIME’s Best Photojournalism of 2012

If 2011 was a year of simple, powerful narratives of revolution and sweeping change 2012 was when things got a lot more complicated.

The aftermath of the Arab Springs upheavals saw uneasy transitions toward democracy. backlinks . The exhilaration of freedom dissolved in the face of new struggles and contests for power: in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere, the streets are once again filled with protesters angry over the advent of religious radicalism, the return of authoritarianism and the unemployment and tough economic conditions that remain. In Syria, peaceful demonstrations in 2011 morphed into a bitter, bloody civil war that has claimed over 40,000 lives and rages on. Hostilities between Israel and its adversaries in the occupied territories were once more renewed as the peace process collapsed and the road map to a two-state solution looked to have been crumpled up and tossed away. And in the U.S., a seemingly endless, costly election cycle served only to restore the status quo: the re-elected President Obama faces many of the same challenges and obstacles he did before Nov. 6.

Throughout 2012, TIMEs unparalleled photojournalists were there. linkwheel . We stood within the tumult of Tahrir Square and shared moments of quiet with the worlds most powerful President. We documented both the ravages of war on Syrias blasted cities and the devastation nature wrought on our own backyard in the Northeast. At a time when so much hangs in the balance, bearing witness can be the most essential act and thats what we do.

Ishaan Tharoor

Tearsheet of The Day | Yuri Kozyrev photo of Saddam’s ‘rat hole’ in FT Weekend

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, unveiled their survey of war photography, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, on Armistice Day yesterday. The FT Weekend magazine featured some of the work from the exhibition in their latest issue. You can view the FT article and slideshow here.  You can also read about the show over at Photo District News, which interviewed the exhibition’s curators.

Below war in Iraq photograph from 2003 by Yuri Kozyrev, which FT Weekend ran as a double truck.

p. 20-21. FT Weekend Magazine. November 10/11 2012 issue.
Photo © Yuri Kozyrev.
“A journalist climbs out of the hole where toppled dictator Saddam Hussein was captured in Ad Dawr. Iraq’s defeated leader raised his arms out of his ‘rat hole’ and said he was Saddam Hussein and that he wanted to negotiate. “ Iraq. December 15, 2003. Inkjet print.

Yuri Kozyrev (Russian, b. 1963) is a member of Noor Images and a contract photographer with Time magazine.

Features and Essays | September 2012

Middle East.

Great work in Time by Moises Saman from recent clashes at his homebase Cairo… Opening spread featured as a Tearsheet of the Day earlier this week…

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Clashes in Cairo (Lightbox) Different edit (Magnum)

Shawn Baldwin and Ayman Oghanna: Syrian Refugees in Turkey (New Yorker)

Bryan Denton: With the Rebels in the Battle for Aleppo (NYT) | Syria (Paris Match)

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Battle for Aleppo (Magnum)

Ricardo Garcia Vilanova: Aleppo (CNN Photo blog) Battle in Aleppo (CNN)

Adam Dean: Syria (Newsweek) | Inside the Syrian Conflict (Panos)

Impressive work from Aleppo by AP’s Manu Brabo.

Photo © Manu Brabo / AP

Manu Brabo: Aleppo (National)

Nicole Tung: Suffering and Resilience: The Hospitals of Aleppo (Lightbox)

Giulio Piscitelli: Risking Their Lives to Save Lives : Syria (Private magazine)

Sam Tarling: Syria (Executive Magazine)

Yuri Kozyrev from Yemen in Time….

Photo © Yuri Kozyrev

Yuri Kozyrev: The End of al-Qaeda? On Patrol in Yemen (Lightbox) different edit (NOOR)

Ed Ou recently in Gaza for the New York Times…

Ed Ou: Gaza (NYT)

Ed Ou: Ways that Life Goes On : Iraq (Getty Reportage Tumblr)

Julien Goldstein’s Perpignan exhibited multi-year Kurdistan project on Reportage website.

Photo © Julien Goldstein

Julien Goldstein: Kurdistan: The Anger Of A People Without Rights (Reportage)

Fernando Moleres: Sounds of Light and Hope (Panos) Egypt

Yaakov Israel: Land of Stories and Myths (Lightbox) Israel

Natalie Naccache: No Madam (Reportage Emerging Talent) Lebanon

Indian subcontinent.

Photo © Roberto Schmidt

Roberto Schmidt: Geddani ship-breakers : Pakistan (The National) | Different edit (Paris Match)

Tim Mitchell: Clothing Recycled : India (Foto8)

Justin Mott: Labor Unrest in Bangladesh’s Garment Industry (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Ageing in India (Panos)

Luigi Baldelli: Prostitution in Bangladesh (Parallelozero)

Europe.

Strong set  by World Press Photo winner Samuel Aranda on the tough economic reality faced by many in Spain…from NYT..

Photo © Samuel Aranda

Samuel Aranda: In Spain, Austerity and Hunger (NYT)

Markel Redondo: The Pain in Spain (Foto8)

Photo © Gianni Cipriano

Gianni Cipriano: In Malta, Immigrants Left in Limbo (NYT)

Stefano De Luigi:  iDyssey (New Yorker)

Platon: Greece (New Yorker)

Walter Astrada: Violence Against Women in Norway (NYT Lens)

Africa.

Brent Stirton in October issue of National Geographic magazine.

Photo © Brent Stirton

Brent Stirton: Blood Ivory (NGM) ‘Thousands of elephants die each year so that their tusks can be carved into religious objects. Can the slaughter be stopped?’

Tyler Hicks on the same topic in NYT.

Tyler Hicks: In Poaching Frenzy, Africa’s Elephants Vanishing (NYT) DRC

Shannon Jensen’s South Sudan series from Newsweek.. Featured in a Tearsheet of they Day last month..

Photographs © Shannon Jensen

Shannon Jensen: A Long Walk (Newsweek) South Sudan | You can also see some of Jensen’s work in this MSF video on Youtube.

John Stanmeyer: Health Crisis in South Sudan, Part I | Health Crisis in South Sudan, Part II (VII) |   Sudanese Refugees in Yida (MSF)

Pete Muller: Humanitarian Crisis in Sudan’s Border  (ushmm.org)

Heartbreaking series of photographs by Nicki Sobecki.

Photo © Nichole Sobecki

Nichole Sobecki: A Tiny Life Ends in South Sudan (NYT Lens)

Mads Nissen: After the War: Libyan Cityscapes (Panos)

Graeme Williams: Painting over the Present : South Africa (Panos)

Dominic Nahr: A Visionary Journey (Lightbox) Kenya

Benedicte Kurzen’s Nigeria project which was exhibited at Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Benedicte Kurzen

Benedicte Kurzen: Tangled Roots of Violence in Northern Nigeria (NYT Lens)

Jerome Delay: Niger’s Nomadic Herdsmen (Guardian) different edit (NBC News)

Jan Grarup: Somalia (Politiken)

Sven Dumelie: Gold Mining in Southern Ethiopia (Guardian)

Latin America.

David Alan Harvey from Rio in October issue of NGM…

Photo © David Alan Harvey

David Alan Harvey: Rio de Janeiro (NGM) ‘Rio is a city of glamour and glitz—but also of poverty and violence in the favelas that climb its hills. With the Olympics coming in 2016, the slums are getting a face-lift.’

Sebastian Liste: The Abandoned Chocolate Factory (Lightbox) Brazil

Pilar Olivares: Ballet Santa Teresa in Rio de Janeiro (Guardian)

New group project by NOOR: Brazil

Photo © Francesco Zizola

Francesco Zizola: Brazil’s Middle Class (NOOR)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Pacifying the Favelas (NOOR)

Andrea Bruce: The Power of Women (NOOR)

Pep Bonet: Brazil’s Transsexuals (NOOR)

Jon Lowenstein: Sao Paolo Rising (NOOR)

Photo © Andrew Moore

Andrew Moore: Reinventing Cuba (NYT Magazine)

Kevin Kunishi: Remembering Nicaragua (New Yorker) | video (Youtube)

Photo © Tomas Munita

Tomas Munita: A Salvadoran Cease-Fire Holds, for Now (NYT)

James Whitlow Delano: A history interwoven with sugar : Suriname (CNN)

Ed Kashi: Making sugar and sweets : Brazil (CNN)

Stephen Ferry: Colombia (New Yorker)

Juan Orrantia: Life After Coca : Colombia (Foto8)

Roberto Guerra: The Curse of Inca Gold (zReportage)

Tarrah Krajnak: Strays (Foto8) Peru

US.

I’m yet to see Lauren Greenfield’s documentary The Queen of Versailles… here is the feature in stills on Institute website….

Photo © Lauren Greenfield

Lauren Greenfield: The Queen of Versailles (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: The Best Club Ever (Institute) video (GQ)

Vittoria Mentasti: For God and for Gold: Photographs from Atlantic City (New Yorker)

Enjoyed Doug Menuez’s Silicon Valley project exhibition at Visa pour l’image… here are the photos on the Lens blog…

Doug Menuez: Steve Job and The Tech Boom (NYT Lens)

Carolyn Drake: The Lubavitchers (Panos)

Shannon Taggart: Basement Vodou: Haitian Spirituality in Brooklyn (Lightbox)

Richard Misrach: Petrochemical America (New Yorker)

Yunghi Kim’s Occupy photos in Süddeutsche Zeitung in Germany to coincide with the one year anniversary of OWS…

Photo © Yunghi Kim

Yunghi Kim: Occupy Wall Street (Süddeutsche Zeitung)

Robert Nickelsberg: The Army Mountain Warfare School (Reportage)

Gillian Laub: Camp Lee Mar: 60 Years of Summer Fun for Special Needs Children (Lightbox)

Callie Shell photographing Obama again…

Photo © Callie Shell

Callie Shell: Obama on the Campaign Trail (Lightbox)

Jason Andrew: Inside Obama’s HQ (FT Magazine)

Ben Lowy: the RNC and DRC Convention Instagrams (New Yorker)

Charles Ommanney: US Presidential Campaign 2012 (Reportage)

Charles Ommanney: Obama in Iowa Campaign Trail (Newsweek)

Lauren Fleishman: The Convention Draws Near: The Romney-Ryan Road Trip to Tampa (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The DRC Delegates (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The RNC Delegates (Lightbox)

Grant Cornett: The RNC Protests (Lightbox)

Lauren Lancaster: RNC (New Yorker)

Charles Ommanney: The Family (Reportage)

Melissa Cacciola: The Mohawk Ironworkers (Lightbox)

Camilo José Vergara: MLK Murals (Lightbox)

Melissa Lyttle: Good Sisters (zReportage)

Touching multimedia by Peter van Agtmael (photos) and Gaia Squarci (video) for the New Yorker

Photo © Peter van Agtmael

Peter van Agtmael (photos) Gaia Squarci (video): Treasure, Thrown Away (New Yorker) “one family’s reckoning with the sudden murder of their loved one.’ Multimedia to accompany a New Yorker article on confidential informants.

Joseph Rodriguez: From Behind Bars (Lightbox)

Zed Nelson: Gun Nation Revisited (Lightbox)

Emily Berl: In Coney Island, Grand Dreams on the Far Edges (NYT Lens)

Gaia Light and Alessandro Cosmelli: Beautiful Brooklyn (Newsweek)

Zachary Canepari’s project on Claressa Shields, young American female boxing phenomenon… He is also working on feature doc I heard….

Photo © Zachary Canepari

Zachary Canepari: T-Rex (Panos)

Wayne Lawrence: Small Ball (Institute) different edit (Lightbox)

Mary Kang: Bhutanese refugees rebuild in Texas (CNN)

UK.

Spencer Murphy shot a terrific portrait project for Save the Children…

Photo © Spencer Murphy

Spencer Murphy: Children’s views of poverty (Guardian) backstage video (Youtube)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Tired of London, Tired of Life (VII)

Afghanistan.

John D McHugh: Kabul – A city of hope and fear (Al Jazeera)

Bryan Denton: In Afghanistan, American Trainers Keep Their Armor On (NYT)

Andrew A. Nelles: K9 Soldiers (zReportage)

Japan.

Kosuke Okahara: Fragments of Fukushima (NYT Lens)

North Korea.

David Guttenfelder and Vincent Yu: Revealing more of North Korea (Boston Globe)

Russia.

Photo © Misha Friedman

Misha Friedman: Corruption in Russia (NYT)

Greenland.

Andrew Testa: Greenland’s Changing Face (NYT)

Stefano De Luigi: Northwest Passage (VII)

Azerbaijan.

Rena Effendi: Liquid Land (Institute)

China.

Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer: China’s One Percent (Foreign Policy)

Huang Qingjun: Chinese families’ worldly goods (BBC)

Adam Dean: China rushes to build a new generation of mega-dams (Telegraph)

Australia.

Jackie Dewe Mathews: Tasmania: Beyond Down Under (Newsweek)

Southeast Asia.

Paula Bronstein: Manila’s hidden spaces: Life on the margins in a crowded megacity (NBC News) Philippines

Laura El-Tantawy: Thailand: Smile Me Hello (VII Mentor)

Jaime Cunningham: Burma Foreign Investors Don’t See (Newsweek)

Tomasz Tomaszewski: Sugar Towns of Yesterday (CNN) Indonesia

Carl de Keyzer: Modern world of sugar consumption (CNN) Indonesia

Projects with various different countries.

Slideshow of late Remi Ochlik’s amazing Arab Apring work on the Lightbox…Revolutions book is now out and can be purchased from Emphas.is.

Photo © Remi Ochlik

Remi Ochlik: Revolutions (Lightbox)

Julian Germain: Classrooms around the world (Guardian)

An edit of Kadir van Lohuizen’s Via Panam project on NBC News website…

Photo © Kadir van Lohuizen

Kadir van Lohuizen: Migration in the Americas : Searching for a better life (NBC News)

Steve Winter: Tigers (NYT Lens)

Martin Roemers: Metropolis (New Yorker)

The End of al-Qaeda? On Patrol in Yemen by Yuri Kozyrev

Yuri Kozyrev and I have spent more hours than we care to remember on ‘embed’ with the great militaries of the world—American, Russian, NATO, Indian. But a chance to travel with a Yemeni Central Security Force (CSF) patrol in the southern Abyan province had both of us filled with nervous excitement. We were keenly aware that Yemen, a desperately poor nation at the bottom of the Arabian Peninsula, doesn’t exactly have the best-equipped army. And yet this army had just dealt al-Qaeda a major military blow in Abyan, earning the respect of all soldiers who have fought against fanatical jihadists, and those of us who have covered those battles.

We were told to bring our own vehicle because the CSF patrol was comprised of a single Toyota pickup truck, and there was no room for passengers. We met our escort on the outskirts of the port of Aden on a day the temperature topped 120 degrees and the humidity, 90%. In that heat, Yuri and I were grateful that, unlike the U.S. military, the Yemeni CSF did not require us to wear body-armor: the soldiers had none themselves. But we knew we were going into towns and villages where many al-Qaeda fighters were still at large, living among the population and just waiting for a chance to strike at the Yemeni military. The leader of our patrol, 2nd Lieutenant Tariq Bishr, warned us that we could take sniper fire at any moment.

TIME

The Sept. 17, 2012 cover of TIME International.

There was also a risk we could hit a landmine: the retreating jihadists had planted thousands of them on the roads leading to the major towns of Zinjibar and Jaar. In those towns, many homes and offices were booby-trapped, designed to kill civilians (many of whom had fled when al-Qaeda had taken over) as they came home.

But if any of this worried Yuri, he didn’t show it: I’ve known from working with him for a decade that he is unflinchingly fearless under fire. He quickly developed a rapport with the soldiers in our patrol, overcoming any concerns they may have had about having to baby-sit a pair of foreigners in a dangerous place. At the start of the patrol, Lieutenant Bishr and his men were nervous about Yuri’s camera, mainly because it attracted too much attention from bystanders. But within a couple of hours, the soldiers had become Yuri’s spotters, pointing out photo opportunities and posing for pictures themselves.

The result is this series of pictures, which offers a rare glimpse into an important battlefield in the war on terror. But it’s worth remembering these were only possible because of the valor of Lieutenant Bishr and his men.

Bobby Ghosh is an editor-at-large at TIME. Read his cover story from Yemen in this week’s issue of TIME here.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

The Wrestlers of Chechnya: Photographs by Yuri Kozyrev

In 1994, when Russia invaded the breakaway region of Chechnya, Yuri Kozyrev, then a freelance photographer, captured some of the most iconic images of the ensuing war. It was too dangerous at the time to live in the Chechen capital of Grozny, which faced heavy Russian bombardment. So he and a group of other reporters (including Marie Colvin, who was killed this year while covering the siege of the Syrian city of Homs) took up residence at a kindergarten called Solnyshka (Sunshine), in the nearby town of Khasavyurt. Lying on the border between Chechnya and the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan, this town of 130,000 suffered relatively little damage during the war, so journalists, as well as some of the Chechen rebels, used it as a place to rest and resupply before heading back into the war zone.

(For daily coverage of the 2012 Games, visit TIME’s Olympics blog)

In June, Kozyrev returned to Khasavyurt to photograph how the town—and its conflict—have evolved. Although heavy fighting ended with the Russian conquest of Chechnya in 2000, the war left behind an Islamist insurgency that Russia still struggles to quell. On an almost daily basis, rebels inspired by a radical sect of Sunni Islam called Salafism continue to clash with security forces in the region, costing hundreds of lives every year. In Khasavyurt, the Russian effort to counter their influence still scars the unpaved streets. In most neighborhoods, gutted homes mark the sites of “special operations,”the commando raids that use heavy artillery to flush out suspected insurgents. But the town has also been shaped by the central element of Russian soft power in the region: the development of wrestling schools. Much like soccer in the favelas of Sao Paolo and basketball in Harlem, wrestling in Khasavyurt is meant to serve as an inoculation against violence, or at least a distraction from it, by offering the local boys an outlet for their frustrations that does not involve ”going to the woods,” the Russian slang for joining the insurgency.

Every year, Moscow pumps roughly a million dollars into Khasavyurt’s five wrestling academies, which have produced an impressive crop of champions. In the past four Olympic cycles, freestyle wrestlers from Khasavyurt have brought home a total of eight gold medals, along with at least 12 world championship titles and countless trophies in national and European tournaments. At the Olympic Games in London, at least two wrestlers from Khasavyurt will compete to affirm the town’s nickname—The Foundry of Champions—which is scrawled on green signs near the central bazaar, showing the legendary Buvaysar Saytiev in the middle of a grapple.

During his visit in June, Kozyrev’s photography focused on Saytiev and his younger brother Adam, who have won four Olympic gold medals in freestyle wrestling between them. For more than a decade, the Saytiev brothers, who are ethnic Chechens, have served as somewhat reluctant poster boys for the notion of pacification through sport. Their wrestling schools have inspired thousands of young men from Khasavyurt to channel their strength into wrestling rather than rebellion, and Kozyrev spent much of his time photographing them train for the London Olympics. But away from the gyms, members of the Khasavyurt wrestling community revealed that the idea of sport as an antidote to extremism is not quite working out as planned. Some of the town’s leading athletes have started “going to the woods” in recent years, and an alarming number of them have been killed as insurgents during shootouts with police. No longer a haven from conflict, the wrestling schools of Khasavyurt, whose students are often as young as 8, have become recruiting ground for Islamists. As Kozyrev concluded after his visit: “This is a town that remains at war.”

Read more about the Chechen wrestlers of Khasavyurt on TIME.com

Simon Shuster is TIME’s Moscow reporter.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Paradise Lost: 20 Years of Independence in Abkhazia

If there is a place on earth that inspires more melancholy, reminiscence and regret than Abkhazia, I have yet to find it. A republic of sighs, home to 250,000 people who still mourn their dead as much as they plan their future.

“Do you remember how it used to be?” they say. “It was like a little Soviet Union.” This is a sweet memory, because the Soviet Union, to Abkhazia, was above all a place where dozens, even hundreds, of races lived under one roof in peace. The brutal ethnic war of ’92-’93 erased many things, but not the memory of a time before bloodshed.

This is equally bittersweet for photographer Yuri Kozyrev, who summered in nearby Sochi as a boy, and who remembers, like all children of the Soviet Union, the paradise that was Abkhazia. Imagine: high mountains dive toward a warm sea. Beaches against verdant forests, long promenades lined with ice cream vendors under palm trees.

Today marks the twentieth anniversary of Abkhazia’s first declaration of independence from Georgia. That initial gesture of July 23, 1992, was boycotted by the ethnic Georgians in government and ignored by the outside world. But soon enough, it began a cycle of attacks and reprisals, fueled by alcohol, old grudges, and the chaos of the Soviet collapse. Total war soon followed, one of the bloodiest and most fratricidal conflicts of a decade that saw plenty of both.

And though the Abkhaz people were victorious—they alone rule Abkhazia now—the republic they liberated has never quite come into being.

Kozyrev and I visited Abkhazia last year, traveling south along that fabled coastline, up into the mountains, down to the tense Georgian border in Gali. Kozyrev had been in Abkhazia during the war; it was my first visit. We were both, however, equally struck by how time just seems to stand still there. A rusting trawler lists on the beach in Sukhum, the radios in the beat up taxis all play songs about the war. In the mountain mining town of Tkvarchal, which starved and suffered under siege during the war, seems half-deserted and wholly inhospitable. Even the national pastime is a sleepy one: the Abkhaz are famous for their skill at dominoes.

Part of this torpor is forced upon them. Georgia and its allies, including the U.S., have been effective in isolating the republic, which it sees as perpetrators of ethnic cleansing against Georgians during and after the war. Only Venezuela, Nicaragua, Vanuatu and a couple of equally small states have recognized its independence. Georgia has blockaded all southern routes by sea and land, and so Abkhazia has to rely on the kindness of its neighbor and patron Russia, with whom it shares a land border.

Yet, they still have their natural gifts. The war did not erase the beaches or the mountains. Russians, particularly poorer ones who can’t afford the neon Shangri-la that Sochi is becoming, still flock to the shore.

The Abkhaz also have something they won at a heavy, heavy price: freedom. The question remains, twenty years later: what will they do with it?

Nathan Thornburgh is a TIME contributing writer and a founder of Roads & Kingdoms, a new journal of foreign correspondence, food, and photography. You can read his full report on his travels to Abkhazia with Kozyrev here.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

The Syrian Arms Race: Photographs by Yuri Kozyrev

In the last week of June, at an airfield outside Moscow, Russia laid out a smorgasbord of military hardware—including everything from tanks to anti-aircraft batteries—and invited some of the most militaristic nations in the world do some pleasant summer shopping. Meat was grilled in barbecue pits, comely models stood around in mini-skirts, ’80s music and obnoxious techno pounded through the speakers, and once a day, a choreographer from the Bolshoi Theater staged a “tank ballet” of twirling war machines that was grandiloquently titled, “Unconquerable and Legendary.”

Welcome to the deceptively titled Forum for Technologies in Machine Building, the biennial Russian arms bazaar that President Vladimir Putin inaugurated in 2010. Delegations from Iran, Bahrain, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, among many others, attended the expo this year, and spent their time ogling cruise missiles, climbing into armored jeeps and trying out the most famous—and most deadly—Russian weapon of them all: the Kalashnikov assault rifle, which is thought to hold the stomach-turning honor of having killed more people than any other weapon in the history of man.

On the afternoon of June 28, TIME followed around the delegation to the arms bazaar from Syria, who, like many of the participants, would not legally be able to buy their weapons in the West (the TIME magazine story is available to subscribers here). For the past 16 months, Syrian forces loyal to President Bashar Assad have brutally tried to crush a homegrown rebellion, which has already cost around 15,000 lives, including thousands of women and children. The U.S. and Europe have responded by banning weapons sales to Syria, and along with their allies in the Arab world, they have pushed for an international arms embargo against Assad’s government. But Russia, the world’s second largest arms dealer after the U.S., has used its veto power in the U.N. to block these sanctions. With around $4 billion in weapons contracts to fulfill for its Syrian clients, Russia has continued supplying arms to Damascus, which gets nearly all of its weapons from Russia.

It was impossible to tell what, if anything, the Syrians came to the Moscow arms bazaar to purchase. Such deals would be signed behind closed doors, and both sides declined to comment. Colonel Isam Ibrahim As’saadi, the military attache at the Syrian embassy in Moscow, chaperoned the three officials in town from Damascus, and they would only say that they came to Moscow especially to attend the fair. The items that seemed to interest them most that day were armored military vehicles, trucks equipped with roof-mounted rocket launchers and brand new Kalashnikov assault rifles. Andrei Vishnyakov, the head of marketing for Izhmash, the company that created the AK-47, spent more than an hour selling them on the virtues of the firm’s new sniper rifles and machine guns. Before handing the head of the Syrian delegation a silencer-equipped AK-104, Vishnyakov said: “This weapon is perfect for close-quarters combat, house to house.” The Syrian official then lifted the gun’s sight to his eye and pointed it across the crowded pavilion, no doubt wondering how useful it could be back home.

Simon Shuster is TIME’s Moscow reporter.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Features and Essays | 10 July 2012

Photo © Sebastião Salgado

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis (Guardian) “For Sebastião Salgado, the opening of his Genesis exhibition at London’s Natural History Museum next year will be the culmination of an eight-year odyssey to capture the last wild places in the world”

From NGM July issue.

Photo © Jonas Bendiksen

Jonas Bendiksen: Russian Summer (NGM) Click here to see how Bendiksen caught the above photo.

Photos © Lynn Johnson

Lynn Johnson: Vanishing Languages (NGM)

Syria.

Photo © Robert King

Robert King: Conflict in Syria (NYT Lens) Related: King’s article in Foreign Policy

Nicole Tung: As Syria Grieves (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy: In Syrian Hospital, No Escape from War (CNN)

Ed Ou: In Turkey, a Staging Ground for Syrian Rebels (NYT)

Kate Brooks: Syria’s Thriving Elite (Newsweek)

Niklas Meltio: Syria (Dagens Nyheter)

Egypt.

Photo © Daniel Berehulak

Daniel Berehulak: Celebrating the Brotherhood’s Victory: A New President is Elected in Egypt (Lightbox)

Alex Majoli: Egypt’s Presidential Pursuit (New Yorker)

Yuri Kozyrev: Egypt in Flux (Lightbox)

Adam Ferguson: Protests as Egypt’s High Court Invalidates Parliament (NYT)

Fernando Moreles: Copts in Crisis (Panos)

Xenia Nikolskaya: Egypt’s Forgotten Palaces (Telegraph Telephoto)

Libya.

Tomas Munita: Libya Elections (NYT)

Sarah Elliott: After the Spring: Women of the Arab Revolution (Lightbox)

various photographers: Almost Dawn in Libya : panorama (Lightbox)

Andre Liohn: Libya (Le Monde)

India.

Photo © Daniel Berehulak / Getty Images

Daniel Berehulak: Hindu pilgrimage to the Amarnath Cave (Guardian)

Sohrab Hura: From Bleak Central India, a People’s Movement (NYT)

South Sudan.

Trevor Snapp: Gun Culture Plagues in South Sudan (CNN)

Tyler Hicks: Sudanese Children in Exile (NYT)

Fabio Bucciarelli:  Next Year’s Failed State : South Sudan (Foreign Policy)

From different parts of the continent of Africa.

Photo © Finbarr O’Reilly / Reuters

Finbarr O’Reilly: Dakar Fashion Week in Senegal (Guardian) Different edit in Paris Match.  Yet another edit on Reuters.

Todd Heisler: In Tunisia, Balancing Democracy and Religion (NYT)

Lynsey Addario: Zimbabwe (VII)

Dan Kitwood: Benin Voodoo Festival (Guardian)

Jan Grarup’s Somalia slideshow includes a photo of a man carrying a shark on the streets of Mogadishu, which I featured in  a Side-by-Side post couple of weeks ago…

Photo © Jan Grarup

Jan Grarup: Somalia (PDN)

Sven Torfinn: Kenya counts the cost of gun violence (Guardian)

Peter DiCampo: Waiting for Gbagbo (Foreign Policy)

Benedict Kurzen: The Ordeal of Flying in Nigeria (NYT)

Shen Bohan: Cameroon’s Field of Dreams (zReportage)

Congos.

Phil Moore: Peacekeepers at War : Congo (WSJ)

Jonathan Torgovnik: ‘A Slow Restart’ in Congo (CNN)

EU economy.

Photo © Emilio Morenatti / AP

Emilio Morenatti: Stillness overtakes a once busy coal mining industry in Spain (MSNBC photo blog)

Filippo Massellani: Despair in Italy (Newsweek)

Markel Redondo: Tu Casa es Mi Casa (Panos)

Yannis Behrakis: The Lost Generation : Greece (Reuters)

Israel and Palestine.

Photo © Oded Balilty / AP

Oded Balilty: The Stone Throwers of Palestine (Lightbox) on AP.

Oded Balilty: The Ultimate Prize Fighters: Practicing Peace through Boxing in Israel (Lightbox)

Linda Forsell:  Photographs of Israel and Palestine (New Yorker)

Adam Golfer: Vignettes from a Contested Land (Lightbox)

Simona Ghizzoni: Afterdark. Consequences of War on Women in the Gaza Strip (burn)

Andrea Gjestvang’s portraits of survivors of the 2011 Norway attacks in Newsweek…If you want to see how these were used in print, go to the Tearsheet of the Day posted end of June, here.

Photo © Andrea Gjestvang

Andrea Gjestvang: Survivors of the 2011 Norway attacks (Newsweek)

US.

Photo © Christopher Anderson

Christopher Anderson: Son  (Washingon Post) “Father’s Day, A Photographer’s Love Letter”

Lucy Nicholson: Father’s Day in Prison (Reuters)

Michael Christopher Brown: Like Father, Like Son (Foam)

Philip Toledano: A Shadow Remains (MediaStorm) NB. Trailer for free. 1.99USD to watch entire multimedia

Maggie Steber: Rite of Passage  (MediaStorm) NB. Trailer for free. 1.99USD to watch entire multimedia

Samantha Box: Invisible Youth (Lightbox)

Todd Heisler: Uniting Through a Prayer Call (NYT Lens)

Bruce Gilden: ‘No Place Like Home: Foreclosures in America’ (Lightbox)

Mike Sinclair: Public Assembly (Lightbox)

Janet Jarman: Marisol and the American Dream (Lightbox)

Donna Ferrato: Leaving Abuse Behind (NYT) From Lightbox

various photographers: State of America: Photographing Joe Klein’s Road Trip (Lightbox)

Gian Paul Lozza: America’s Undocumented Immigrants (Lightbox)

Photo © Sean Hemmerle

Sean Hemmerle: Drone Zone (NYT Magazine)

Mike Stotts: Cowboy Showdown (zReportage)

Dina Kantor: The Demise of Treece, Kansas (New Yorker)

David Armstrong: Below the 14th Street, Downtown scene (New Yorker)

Martin Parr: Picturing the American South (Lightbox)

Danny Wilcox Frazier: Lost Nation: America’s Rural Ghetto (burn)

Christaan Felber: Boxing in Bushwick (New Yorker)

Rebecca Norris Webb: My Dakota (NYT Lens)

Lucas Foglia: A Natural Order (Lightbox)

Zun Lee: Exploring African-American Fatherhood (NYT Lens)

David Goldman: Saving Auburn Avenue (Time)

Jennifer Kaczmarek: Love for Alyssa Still Grows (CNN)

Josef Kaczmarek: Gun Crisis (zReportage)

Gloria Baker Feinstein: Memories Bought and Sold (NYT Lens)

Adam Bartos: The Darkroom: Nostalgia for a Dying Craft (Lightbox)

China.

Photo © Kurt Tong

Kurt Tong: The Queen, The Chairman and I (Foto8)

Mark Leong: Hong Kong (NYT Lens)

Sim Chi Yin: Beijing’s Basement Dwellers (Newsweek) Same in Foreign Policy. Same on VII Mag.

Around the Gulf.

Several proper photo features on the Daily Mail website recently…What’s going?  This by Institute’s Guillaume Herbaut…

Photo © Guillaume Herbaut

Guillaume Herbaut: Sofex Arms Fair (Daily Mail)

Ebrahim Noroozi: Documenting Death Sentences in Iran (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: Bahrain Protesters Focus Ire on United States (NYT)

Kate Peters: Location, Location, Location : Fujaraih, UAE (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Ayman Oghanna: Yesterday’s War, Today’s Iraq (burn)

Afghanistan.

Zalmai: Dreams and Dread in Afghanistan (New Yorker)

Tyler Hicks: On Board the USS John C Stennis (NYT)

Turkey.

Pari Dukovic’s Turkish Oil Wrestlers in Lightbox… I only became aware of Dukovic early May when I saw one of his portraits in the New Yorker…Which was this blog’s first Tearsheet of the Day.

Photo © Pari Dukovic

Pari Dukovic: Inside the World of Turkish Oil Wrestling (Lightbox)

Jason Andrew: Soccer’s Lost Boys, Stranded in Istanbul (NYT Lens)

From various countries.

Photo © Suzanne Lee / Save the Children

Suzanne Lee: Family Planning in Nepal (Guardian)

various photographers: Troubled Waters (NYT)

Stuart Matthews: Changing Tides (Foto8)

Mario Tama: Brazil’s Development Dilemma (Time)

Gustavo Jononovich: Richland (burn)

Photo © Matt Lutton

Matt Lutton:  “Only Unity”: Serbia In The Aftermath of Yugoslavia (burn) On  Wired Raw File blog

Justyna Mielnikiewicz: Brides From Belarus (Newsweek)

Damir Sagolj: Myamar’s Rohingyas (Reuters)

John Vink: Quest for Land (NYT Lens)

Giulio Di Sturco: Iwahig: A Prison Without Walls (Reportage)

Gianni Giosue: The Chechen Refugees in Pankisi Valley (Private photoreview)

Ross McDonnell: Remember Me, My Ghost: Documenting Ireland’s Notorious Ballymun Neighborhood (Lightbox)

Nano Calvo: Hounding Misery (zReportage)

Kosuke Okahara: On a Japanese Island, a Community Apart (NYT)

Katrin Koenning: Loraine and the Illusion of Illoura – Encounters with an Outer Land (Firecracker)

Lindsay Blatt and Paul Taggart: Rounding Up Iceland’s Horses (NYT Lens)

Haiti.

Maggie Steber: Haiti (NYT Lens)

Benjamin Rusnak: Rachel’s Village: Haiti (zReportage)

UK.

Kate Peters directed project of British Olympians for the Guardian….Filmed by Peters and Joseph Turp

Photos © Kate Peters

Kate Peters: Olympic Bodies (Guardian) Stills on Peters’ website: Olympians | Tearsheets of stills printed in the Guardian Weekend magazine shown on Institute website.

Mark Seager: Made in England (Reportage)

Andrew Testa: Anyone for Tennis? (Panos)

Sophie Evans: East London People (Guardian)

Pretty awesome photographs taken by London’s urban explorers….photographers’ names withheld for obvious reasons…

various photographers: Exploring London (Evening Standard Magazine)

Toby Smith: When The Lea Valley Closed (Reportage)

Christopher Furlong: Red Arrows (Guardian)

Ewen Spencer: Teenagers (GUP)

Mexico.

Photo © Stefan Ruiz

Stefan Ruiz: Soap Mex (FT Magazine) Same series on Lightbox.

Eunice Adorno: Guadalaraja, Mexico (New Yorker)

Rodrigo Cruz: With Prosperity Elusive, Mexican Voters Focus on the Economy (NYT)

Alejandro Cartagena: Car Poolers (NYT Lens)

Shaul Schwarz: Jeffrey’s Difficult Move (NYT) video

Photo © Marco Kesseler

various photographers: 36: Press and Editorial Photography from Falmouth (Foto8)

To finish off….

The Onion: Internet Scam Alert: Most “Kickstarter” Projects Just Useless Crap (YouTube)