Tag Archives: Year One

Paul Ryan: All Pumped Up for His Closeup

When TIME named Paul Ryan a runner-up in the 2011 Person of the Year issue, many were familiar with his proposed budget, but few knew that the Wisconsin Congressman stayed fit with the now best-selling P90X workout plan. (Ryan’s father and grandfather both died of a heart attack.) In fact, it was Ryan’s fitness regime — and Herculean strength on all things fiscal — that inspired this workout-themed sitting for Person of the Year. One of these portraits, photographed by Gregg Segal, appears in the Oct. 22, 2012, issue.

Tony Horton, the stand-up comedian turned P90X creator, says the rigorous workout has been boosted from both sides of the aisle. “I think Paul Ryan’s been very good for P90X, as much or more so as Michelle Obama,” he says. “I’ve worked with the First Lady and her Let’s Move campaign. Some of the Secret Service came up to me and said, ‘Hey man, we’re really loving the P90X.’ I’m well aware that they’re using it in the White House.”

According to Horton, you don’t need a lot of equipment to get fit. Ryan likes to use weights, but they aren’t a necessity. “You need the human body, Mother Earth and Sir Isaac Newton’s law of gravity,” Horton says.

TIME asked Horton to suggest a get-fit regimen that could be implemented alongside the presidential campaign but still leave time for careful consideration of the issues. He recommended an upper-body exercise, a cardiovascular interval exercise, a core exercise and a leg exercise. (For further details — and diagrams! — check the Oct. 22 issue.)

Confusing the electorate is unwise, but according to Horton, confusing the muscles is a plus. This involves changing the routine often so muscles don’t get accustomed to any one exercise. To get the full benefit of this regimen, you’ve got to make like the party and diversify. “Do a different push-up every time,” suggests Horton. “Add kenpo karate or jumping jacks or whatever on that second move. On the crunches, modify your position to engage the abs or core directly. You can do squats with your feet wide, your feet narrow. It’s a workout that might also give you a bounce. As few as two rounds of that will release norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin.”

Perfect for when the poll numbers aren’t going your way.

Read more about Horton on TIME Healthland and see more photos of Ryan on Swampland.

Segal is a Los Angeles–based photographer. See more of his work here.

Luscombe is an editor-at-large at TIME.

Jessica Bruah, Ceremony for New Dam

Jessica Bruah, Ceremony for New Dam

Jessica Bruah

Ceremony for New Dam,
Lake Delton, Wisconsin , 2008
From the No Lake This Summer series
Website – JessicaBruah.com

Jessica Bruah received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2009 and her BFA from Columbia College Chicago in 2004. She has exhibited work both nationally and internationally, including shows at Jen Bekman Gallery in New York City, Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago, and Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe. In 2010 Bruah was awarded a Swing Space artist residency through the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. She also had two solo exhibitions in the past year: one in Fall of 2010 at Georgia College Museum for her project Stories, and one in the spring of 2011 at ACRE Projects in Chicago. In the fall of 2012 she will be a resident at the Vermont Studio Center. She blogs about her work at JessicaBruah.Tumblr.com.

TIME Picks the Best Viral Photos of 2011

Spontaneous snapshots. Intimate moments. Unexpected exposures. There was no one formula for this year’s most viral photographs. Most were based on news events, such as the death of longtime Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi—but these photos ended up becoming the news themselves. They shocked us. They awed us. They inspired us to feel. But the most powerful feeling was the impulse to share.

The best viral images of 2011 are those we found flooding our email inboxes and Twitter feeds this year. One thing weaves the images together: each photographer netted a once-in-a-lifetime picture. From Royal Wedding mania and a bloodied despot to an utterly unexpected leopard on the loose, photographers both professional and amateur brought us the scenes of unpredictability and chaos that gripped our world over the past 12 months. As shocking as the subject matter is the simplicity of some images. A few came from mobile phones. Most were snapped without a thought of—or time to handle—composition or lighting. One was even taken by a man who would be dead minutes later.

Given that the Internet is a notoriously fickle beast, it’s impossible to predict which photos will score a hit. Here, LightBox looks back on the photos we couldn’t help but share. —Nick Carbone

Zoe Crosher Named LACMA Art Here and Now Artist

Since 1963, LACMA has supported local emerging artists, first with the Young Talent Award, then in 1986 with the Art Here and Now (AHAN) program. This year, one of the two recipients of the prestigious award is Aperture-featured photographer Zoe Crosher. Carefully selected by LACMA’s Modern and Contemporary Art Council (MCAC) as well as the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art curators, nine unique images from Crosher’s The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois have now been acquired for LACMA’s permanent collection.

 

Zoe Crosher is an artist living in Los Angeles. Her work has been exhibited in Vancouver, Rotterdam, Los Angeles, and New York City, including a billboard project with LAXART (2010) and inclusion in the 2010 California Biennial. She has been working on Los Angeles-inspired, site-specific photographic projects since 2001. Her monograph Out the Window (LAX) examines space and transience around the Los Angeles airport, and a series of four monographs on her newest project, The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois, are forthcoming from Aperture Ideas. Crosher has just been announced as a 2011 recipient of LACMA’s prestigious Art Here and Now: Studio Forum (AHAN) program to support acquisitions by emerging Los Angeles-area artists. She holds a B.A. in Art & Politics from UC Santa Cruz, and an M.F.A. in Photography & Integrated Media from CalArts.

 

The project  The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois is also a print-on-demand limited-edition artist book. It is the first in a four-volume set by the artist, and part of Aperture Ideas: Writers and Artists on Photography, a series devoted to the finest critical and creative minds exploring key concepts in photography, including new technologies of production and dissemination.

 

Identical in structure, each volume offers an alternate perspective on the archive of Michelle duBois, an enigmatic collection of images bequeathed to the artist by the subject and compiler. In each subsequent volume, Crosher configures a new set of identities and meanings for this ephemeral archive of photographic detritus through a selection of unique sets of images, reinterpretations of photos seen in previous volumes, as well as new texts.

 

Zoe Crosher’s The Unraveling of Michelle duBois is a reconsidered archive culled from crates, boxes and albums consisting of endless flirtatious smiles, tourist shots, cheesecake mementos and suggestive poses in every film type and size. This limited-edition artist book includes a unique to the volume 8 x 10-inch signed and numbered print. The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois was featured in Aperture magazine, issue 198.