Tag Archives: Yale University School

INFRA: Richard Mosse

Débris, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, 2011 © Richard Mosse

Richard Mosse: Infra an exhibition opens tonight at Jack Shainman Gallery. His images of the conflict-torn Congo seem disconnected from reality, due to the bright reds and pinks of the photographer’s distinctive Kodak Aerochrome film. The results offer a fevered inflation of the traditional reportage document, underlining the growing tension between art, fiction, and photojournalism. Infra initiates a dialogue with photography that begins as an intoxicating meditation on a broken genre, but ends as a haunting elegy for a vividly beautiful land touched by unspeakable tragedy.

In addition to the exhibition, Aperture is pleased to announce a new limited-edition photograph by Richard Mosse, Débris, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, 2011. The New Yorker‘s Photo Booth recently published Great Mistakes: Richard Mosse, about the image. View the details here.

Also now available is special pre-release collector’s edition of Richard Mosse’s first monograph Infra, featuring a specially designed cloth cover. Buy the book here, only 500 copies available!

Mosse was recently featured on our Summer 2011 cover of Aperture magazine 201 with the accompanying article Richard Mosse: Sublime Proximity interview with Aaron Schuman.

Exhibition on view: November 17, 2011 – December 23, 2011

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 West 20th Street
New York, New York 10011

Hear Richard speak at SCOPE Miami on Sunday, December 4 at 2:00 pm

Richard Mosse (b. 1980, Ireland) received an MFA in photography from Yale University School of Art and a postgraduate diploma in fine art from Goldsmiths, London. He also holds a first-class BA in English literature from King’s College London and a master’s in cultural studies from the London Consortium (ICA, AA, Tate, Birkbeck). His work has been widely exhibited internationally, including at the Akademie der Künste, Berlin; Barbican Art Gallery, London; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Tate Modern, London; Dublin Gallery of Photography; and SFMOMA Artists Gallery. In 2011, Mosse was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, with a supplemental stipend from the Leon Levy Foundation. In 2006, he received a Leonore Annenberg Fellowship in the Performing and Visual Arts. Mosse is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Bruce Davidson’s Subway Exhibition

© Magnum/Bruce Davidson

In 1986, Aperture first published Bruce Davidson‘s Subway—a ground-breaking series that has garnered critical acclaim both as a document of a unique moment in the cultural fabric of New York City as well as for its phenomenal use of extremes of color and shadow set against flash-lit skin. In Davidson’s own words, “the people in the subway, their flesh juxtaposed against the graffiti, the penetrating effect of the strobe light itself, and even the hollow darkness of the tunnels, inspired an aesthetic that goes unnoticed by passengers who are trapped underground, hiding behind masks, and closed off from each other.”

Accompanying the third edition of this classic of photographic literature, Aperture Gallery will present Subway, an exhibition of the iconic color images that move the viewer through a landscape at times menacing, at other times lyrical, soulful, and satiric. The images include the full panoply of New Yorkers—from weary straphangers and languorous ladies in summer dresses to stalking predators and the homeless.

There will also be a Talk and Book Signing event at Strand Books on Monday, September 26, 2011. Buying a copy of the new edition of Subway, or a $10 Strand gift card will get you into the event. Although tickets are sold out online, more tickets will be sold at the door the night of the signing.

Bruce Davidson (born in Oak Park, Illinois, 1933) is considered one of America’s most influential documentary photographers. He began taking photographs when he was ten, and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Yale University School of Design. In 1958 he became a member of Magnum Photos, and in 1962, he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to document the civil rights movement. After a solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1963, followed by a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1967, Davidson spent two years photographing in East Harlem, resulting in East 100th Street. In 1980, after living in New York City for twenty-three years, Davidson began his startling color essay of urban life in Subway. Davidson received a second National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1980, and an Open Society Institute Individual Fellowship in 1998. His work has been shown at the International Center of Photography, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum de Tokyo, Paris; Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Museum Rattu, Arles, France; Burden Gallery (Aperture), New York; Parco Gallery, Tokyo; and New-York Historical Society.

Exhibition on view:
Tuesday, October 4, 2011–Saturday, October 29, 2011

Opening reception:
Thursday, October 13, 2011, 6:00 pm

Artist Talk:
Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 6:30 pm

Aperture Gallery
547 West 27th Street, 4th floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

2011 Benefit and Auction Spotlight: Honoree Bruce Davidson

Boys at the Lake, Central Park, 1992 © Bruce Davidson/Howard Greenberg Gallery

Benefit Honoree Bruce Davidson‘s photograph Boys at the Lake, Central Park is one of the many exciting items up for auction at this year’s Benefit. The black and white image depicts four boys climbing on overhanging branches, starkly silhouetted against the Manhattan skyline. The photographer writes, of the image, “I discovered these young children swinging on low branches of trees over the lake. They seemed very free to me and comfortable as I made a few panoramic exposures. I thanked them and continued walking along.”

“The layers of life are very deep within Central Park, and no one will ever finish photographing Central Park. […] I used a panoramic camera with a rotating drum scan for much of the work in the park because Olmstead saw the park as a proscenium that moved, like during a carriage ride, or strolling, so I needed that 150 degree view.”

Bruce Davidson (born in Oak Park, Illinois, 1933) is considered one of America’s most influential photographers. He began taking photographs when he was ten, and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Yale University School of Design. In 1958 he became a member of Magnum Photos, and in 1961 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to document the civil rights movement. After a solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1966, followed by a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1967, Davidson spent two years photographing one block in East Harlem, resulting in East 100th Street. A solo exhibition of this work was curated by John Szarkowski for the Museum of Modern Art in 1970. In 1980, after living in New York City for twenty-three years, Davidson began his startling color series of urban life in Subway. Davidson received a second National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1980, and an Open Society Institute Individual Fellowship in 1998. He received this year an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts from the Corcoran College of Art and Design. His work has been shown at the International Center of Photography, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Museum Reattu, Arles, France; Burden Gallery (Aperture), New York; Parco Gallery, Tokyo; and New-York Historical Society.

Click here to preview artworks from the Auction and to bid online

Click here to purchase tickets to the Benefit and for more information

Click here to see Bruce Davidson’s new edition of his classic book Subway, to be published by Aperture this Fall

Photographer #361: Andrea Modica

Andrea Modica, 1960, USA, received a BFA at State University of New York College at Purchase and an MFA at Yale University School of Art. She released seven different monographs. Her latest book is Fountain. It contains images of the Baker’s family taken over the course of ten years in the small city called Fountain in Colorado. Modica uses a 8×10″ camera and creates moments that become narrative fantasies that mix documentary photography with portraiture. In her book Treadwell, made in an earlier stage of her career, she followed a girl called Barbara and her family. The staged images twist reality into fanytasy creating photographs that resemble fables and fairy tales. Amongst her other monographs are Minor League, Real Indians and Human Being. Andrea has exhibited her work extensively throughout the world and is in numerous permanent collections, books and catalogues. Her images have appeared in a vast amount of magazines. The following images come from the series Fountain, Treadwell and Minor League.

Website: www.andreamodica.com

Photographer #361: Andrea Modica

Andrea Modica, 1960, USA, received a BFA at State University of New York College at Purchase and an MFA at Yale University School of Art. She released seven different monographs. Her latest book is Fountain. It contains images of the Baker’s family taken over the course of ten years in the small city called Fountain in Colorado. Modica uses a 8×10″ camera and creates moments that become narrative fantasies that mix documentary photography with portraiture. In her book Treadwell, made in an earlier stage of her career, she followed a girl called Barbara and her family. The staged images twist reality into fanytasy creating photographs that resemble fables and fairy tales. Amongst her other monographs are Minor League, Real Indians and Human Being. Andrea has exhibited her work extensively throughout the world and is in numerous permanent collections, books and catalogues. Her images have appeared in a vast amount of magazines. The following images come from the series Fountain, Treadwell and Minor League.

Website: www.andreamodica.com

SNAPSHOT: Tod Papageorge

By Anna Carnick

Portrait of Tod Papageorge by Deborah Flomenhaft,courtesy of Tod Papageorge

Picture 1 of 6

For this week’s SNAPSHOT, we spoke with respected photographer, teacher, and author Tod Papageorge. Papageorge’s much-anticipated new book, Core Curriculum: Writings on Photography—a series of essays, lectures, reviews, and interviews—offers critical insight into the role of artists like Atget, Brassaï, Robert Frank (with Walker Evans), Robert Adams, Josef Koudelka, and his close friend, Garry Winogrand. It also delves into photography’s relationship to poetry, and how the evolution of the medium’s early technologies led to the twentieth-century creation of the self-conscious photographer/artist. The book is available for pre-order now here.

One of the most influential voices in photography today, Papageorge has been the Walker Evans Professor of Photography at the Yale University School of Art since 1979.

He will be in conversation tomorrow with photographer John Pilson at the Aperture Gallery. More details here.

Papageorge took a few moments to speak with us on the eve of his book release.

 

AC: How do you describe your personality?
TP: Attic.

What is your definition of happiness?
Birdsong. Or Louis Armstrong’s fanfare and solo in “West End Blues.”

Name your greatest hero.
Mozart, for writing The Requiem, The Magic Flute, and his clarinet concerto in the last year of his short life.

Your greatest achievement as an artist so far?
To remain an artist so far.

The greatest challenge you’ve faced as an artist?
To call myself an artist (as I did in the previous response) and not a photographer.

Your greatest personal achievement?
Being Theo’s father.

The biggest life lesson you’ve learned so far?
That life is the thing in front of you, there, immensely larger than the lesson it might seem to promise but, in my experience, withholds.

If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?
The timpanist for a small-city orchestra who, in his off-hours, writes poetry in strict rhyme.

Your favorite photograph?
Read Core Curriculum.

Your favorite new (or emerging) artist?
Roberto Bolaño. A Chilean writer, actually. And dead since 2003. But the most exciting artist I’ve encountered in the past five-ten years.

Your favorite photography exhibit of all time?
The one I most learned from was the 1968 Brassaï exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. I just “got” it, at a particularly crucial moment in my development as a photographer, although I couldn’t have said then what it was that I got. Equally remarkable to me, though, in this new century, were the ICP exhibitions of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “Scrapbook” [Henri Cartier-Bresson’s Scrapbook: Photographs, 1932–1946] and Garry Winogrand’s “1964” [Winogrand 1964].

Your favorite photo book ever?
The Decisive Moment, which I initially saw in 1962, a few months after I began to photograph, and, on the heels of that, The Americans, which I discovered in San Francisco shortly before I heard Robert Frank give his first public lecture at the museum there.

Name a person—living or dead—you’d really like to meet.
Shakespeare, preferably after he’d given up writing for the stage. Among other things, I’d ask him why he stopped; how he filled his time and (great) mind; and who he’d name as a person—living or dead—he’d really like to meet.

Do you have a mentor?
Garry Winogrand was a mentor of mine, although what he taught me had as much to do with how to think and live (in the moment) as it did with making photographs.

The natural talent you’d like to be gifted with?
Organization.

For what fault do you have the most tolerance?
Disorganization.

Your favorite quality in a man?
The willingness to acknowledge pain.

What qualities do you appreciate most in friends?
Humor and a ready hand when the waiter brings the bill.

Your favorite motto?
“The best way out is always through.” —Robert Frost


Core Curriculum: Tod Papageorgeand John Pilson in Conversation

Core Curriculum: Writings on Photography is the long-awaited collection of essays, reviews, and lecturessome of which have gained a cult following from online postingsbyTod Papageorge, one of the most influential voices in photography today. get girls . buy here pay here car lots . As a photographer and the Walker Evans Professor of Photography at the Yale University School of Art, Papageorge has shaped the work and thought of generations of artist/photographers. At the same time, his critical writings have earned him a reputation as an unusually eloquent and illuminating guide to the work of many of the most important figures in twentieth-century photography.

Join us as Papageorge, one of the most influential voices in photography today, engages in conversation with photographerJohn Pilson. Book signing and reception to follow.

Wednesday, June 29, 6:30 pm

FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

 

Photographer #316: Kathryn Parker Almanas

Kathryn Parker Almanas, 1981, USA, is a conceptual fine art photographer who also focuses on making collages. She received a BFA at the Massachusetts College of Art and an MFA at Yale University School of Art. Inspired by a personal experience with bodily illness, her work deals with the universal themes of corporeal existence, anxieties and phobias connected to the world of medicine. In her series Pre-Existing Condition she uses food as a stand-in for the body and its organs. Pastry, jellies and fruit juices become flesh and blood, creating abstract images of “the parts of ourselves both essential to our survival and responsible for our death.” In her earlier series Pastry Anatomy she “treated” various pastries as a surgeon or lab would. Her work has been exhibited throughout the USA. The following images come from the series Pre-Existing Condition, Spellato and Medical Interior.

Website: www.kathrynparkeralmanas.com