Tag Archives: World Press Photo

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | November 2012

Deadlines

Nieman Fellowships : International entries December 1 | US entries January 31

John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford : International entries December 1 | US entries January 15

Arte Laguna Prize : December 5

SocialDocumentary.net / MSH Photography Fellowship in Africa : December 7

FotoVisura Photography Grant : December 15

Magnum Foundation Human Rights Fellowship for the 2013 NYU-MF Photography and Human Rights Program : December 17

Magenta Flash Forward 2013 Call for Submissions : December 31

Environmental Photographer of the Year : December 31

Half-Lives : The Chernobyl Workers Now. World Press Photo Multimedia Contest 2012 , 2nd prize
Maisie Crow, Jesse Dukes, Ted Genoways.

World Press Photo 2013 Multimedia Contest : January 10

Noorderlicht Photofestival 2013 : January 11

Canon ProfiFoto Award : January 13

Days Japan International Photojournalism Awards : January 15

FotoEvidence Book Award : January 15

The Syngenta Photography Award  : January 15

Mubarak steps down. 10 February 2011. Photo © Alex Majoli
World Press Photo 2012 Contest, General News, 1st prize singles,

World Press Photo 2013 : Deadline January 17 | deadline for requesting user name and password January 11

Alexia Foundation Grant : January 18

Gomma Books – “Su-ture” : February 18

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23

Nikon Photo Contest : February 28

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients and related

Boo and his rabbit, Lynemouth, Northumberland , 1983. © Chris Killip

Deutsche Börse 2013 – a shortlist that’s short of photographers  | in pictures (Guardian)  | Related from BJP

World Press Photo: The full list of jury members of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest

World Press Photo: 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass | ‘The 19th edition of the annual masterclass brought masters and young photographers together for five days in Amsterdam’

Photo © Jordi Ruiz Cicera

Taylor Wessing Photographic Prize 2012 winners (BBC)

Jordi Ruiz Cirera wins Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2012 (BJP)

Rory Peck Awards.

Winners Announced at Rory Peck Awards 2012

The UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards 2012 winners

The British Journalism Awards 2012: Finalists revealed (Press Gazette)

2012 Prix Pictet winner Luc Delahaye: Ambush, Ramadi, Iraq. Photograph: Luc Delahaye/Prix Pictet Ltd /Courtesy Galerie Nathalie Obadia

Guardian: The strength of the Prix Pictet is in danger of becoming watered down | ‘The prestigious photography prize must not lose its focus on showing the devastating impact of humans on the environment’

Channel 4′s Gypsy Blood wins Grierson award

Guardian Student Media awards 2012 winners

Fernando Moleres and the Empathic Eye

Rampant overcrowding plagues prisons across the globe, even in the world’s most developed nations. In Sierra Leone, one of Africa’s poorest countries, and one struggling to emerge from a decade of civil war, prisons are cauldrons of violence and neglect, where death and disease stalk inmates at every turn. In the nation’s capital of Freetown, the crumbling Freetown Central Prison was built to hold 220 adult inmates but houses 1,300, including dozens of children as young as 14 years old.

In 2010, Spanish photographer Fernando Moleres traveled to Sierra Leone determined to document what he describes as “disastrous” conditions at the penitentiary. Inspiration for the trip, he says, came after viewing the work of French photographer Lizzie Sadin, who has spent time capturing prison conditions around the world. The result of Moleres’ work could not have been more fruitful in a purely professional sense. He has won several international prizes for his work at the notorious Freetown Central Prison, better known as Pademba Road, including a 2012 Lucie Award and a 2011 award from World Press Photo. His series, additionally, has been published by some of Europe’s most prestigious publications.

Yet Moleres refuses to call his work a success. He remains haunted by something his photos were not able to convey — the uncertainty that reigns at the penitentiary. Dozens of boys, Moleres explains, have spent up to six years in prison without knowing anything about their judicial case. Many boys, abandoned by their families and with no support to speak of, believe they will die incarcerated.

“It’s very difficult to reflect this neglect through photography,” Moleres tells TIME. “In Sierra Leone, a prisoner is nobody, and a young prisoner is nothing.”

Faced with this disregard, and frustrated by photography’s constraints, Moleres resorted to his previous profession as a nurse, which he practiced as a youth in his native Orduña, in northern Spain’s Basque Country. During his first visit to the prison on Pademba Road, Molores snuck in with medicine to help prisoners where photos could not. And Moleres insists that the images of acute neglect — dehydration and scabies plague most inmates — cast a constant cloud over the professional accolade he has received.

“Photography has its limits,” says Moleres, who worked as a nurse in Spain before turning to photography. “I’m very happy with the project, it has received a lot of attention, but it’s just a drop in the ocean. Nobody has moved a finger to help these boys.”

Until recently, that is. Moleres returned from another excursion to Freetown just last month, where, with the help of the NGO Free Minor Africa, he gave birth to an organization that will help boys navigate through Sierra Leone’s penal and judicial systems. When fully up-and-running, Moleres hopes to help up to 20 boys, whether they need legal assistance or help with rehabilitation once they are freed from prison. Moleres will also provide them with the option of returning to school or retraining so they may enter the workforce.

Moleres, nonetheless, has no intention of abandoning his photography. He’s currently working on a book that will capture the boys of Pademba Road at various stages of their prison experience, from incarceration to rehabilitation to life on the street.

“If you don’t do anything to follow it up, photography is not worth much,” says Moleres. “We become very conscious of everything but there is little action. I’m more interested in dedicating myself to photographic projects in which action follows close behind.”


Fernando Moleres is a Barcelona-based photographer. He was awarded second prize in the Daily Life category of the 2011 World Press Photo competition for his work in Sierra Leone.

Alfonso Serrano is a senior editor at TIME.com.

 


Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | October 2012

Deadlines

International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña : October 31

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2012 : October 31

PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Awards : November 1

Pikto Top Pick Photo Contest : November 1

Aftermath Project grant : November 5

Prix Lucas Dolega : November 15

Tim Hetherington Grant invites submissions…

Photo © Stephen Ferry

Tim Hetherington Grant : November 15 | Tim Hetherington Grant invites photojournalist submissions (BJP)

Terry O’Neill/Tag Award 2012 : November 22

Agence Française de Développement Photo Contest : November 23

Nieman Fellowships : International entries December 1 | US entries January 31

John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford : International entries December 1 | US entries January 15

FotoVisura Photography Grant : December 15

Flash Forward 2013 Call for Submissions : December 31

Environmental Photographer of the Year : December 31

Magnum Foundation Human Rights Fellowship for the 2013 NYU-MF Photography and Human Rights Program : December 17

World Press Photo Multimedia Contest : January 10

Noorderlicht Photofestival 2013 : January 11

World Press Photo 2013 : Deadline January 17 | deadline for requesting user name and password January 11| press release on the jury and categories

Photo seen © Ami Vitale. Alexia Foundation professional grant winner in 2000.

Alexia Foundation Grant : January 18 2013

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23  2013

Nikon Photo Contest : February 28 2013

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients

Big congratulations to Peter van Agtmael, winner of this year’s W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund Grant for Humanistic Photography

Photo © Peter van Agtmael

The W. Eugene Smith Awards: Winners and Finalists (New Yorker) | Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant (PDN) | Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography (Lightbox) | ‘Seeing Iraq and Afghanistan, Unembedded’ (NYT Lens)

Frontline Club Award 2012 Photojournalism category winner:  18 days with Syrian Rebels by Goran Tomasevic for Reuters.

“Unparalleled combat photography.” -Jon Lee Anderson

Photo © Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The winners of the Frontline Club Awards 2012

Aris Messinis wins Bayeux-Calvados Photography Prize (BJP) | Les lauréats du Prix Bayeux des correspondants de guerre 2012 sont… (in French) (Prix Bayeux) | AFP journalist Aris Messinis wins the Photography Prize at the Bayeux-Calvados Awards for War Correspondents (AFP)

The Rory Peck Awards Finalists

Liz Hingley wins first Prix Virginia (BJP)

Ambush; Ramadi, Iraq, 22 July 2006 © Luc Delahaye

2012 Prix Pictet winner Luc Delahaye – in pictures (Guardian) | Luc Delahaye wins Prix Pictet photography prize (BJP)

Prix Pictet prize, Saatchi Gallery, SW3 : review (London Evening Standard)

Two Photographers Selected for $500,000 MacArthur “Genius” Grants (PetaPixel)

British Journal of Photography wins Lucie Award for Photography Magazine of the Year (BJP)

Alvaro Deprit and Nikolai Ishchuk win BJP’s IPA

Guardian Student Media awards 2012 Finalists

2012 CGAP Photo Contest Winners

IdeasTap Photographic Award 2012: the finalists

Violentology: Stephen Ferry Documents the Colombian Conflict

Photographer Stephen Ferry has spent ten years documenting the ongoing internal armed conflict in Colombia — a situation that, he says, is often overlooked or miscast as a ‘drug war’ outside of the country. In his recently-published book, Violentology: A Manual of the Colombian Conflict, Ferry presents a comprehensive look at this incredibly complicated and brutal conflict with the use of his own photographs, historical imagery and text.

Printed on heavy newsprint and produced on the rotary press of the Bogota daily newspaper El Espectador, Violentology’s physicality references the tradition of print journalism  an industry which has played a central role in shedding light on many of the atrocities committed in Colombia.

“The point here is not just to present photographs but also that they be accompanied by an investigation that is very serious,” said Ferry. “And all of that really detailed and important and dramatic information is information that came from the Colombian press. So, I wanted the design to reflect my respect for their practice.”

The book’s outsize pages are the width of magazine spreads, another nod to print journalism, but also, Ferry said, a way to get readers to spend time with the tome.

“The topic is a very serious one and its not necessarily a topic that is in the headlines, so I wanted to use whatever visual and design strategies I could in order to slow the readers’ down and keep people’s attention on the subject,” he explains.

Ferry’s Violentology project was awarded the inaugural Tim Hetherington Grant in 2011 by World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch. Additional support from the Open Society Institute has helped to make the book available in both Spanish and English versions. Selected chapters are also available as downloadable PDFs.

Stephen Ferry is a photojournalist whose work has received numerous honors from World Press and Magnum Foundation among others. See more of his work here.

Violentology was recently published by Umbrage Editions. See more about the book here

Tearsheet of The Day | Brent Stirton’s Blood Ivory in the National Geographic magazine

The latest National Geographic magazine issue, October 2012, has a cover story called Blood Ivory, written by Bryan Christy, an investigation linking religious art and ivory smuggling. The photographs are by the always brilliant Brent Stirton. The photo seen in the below spread is one of the most harrowing images of the series. You can view the entire edit online on the magazine’s website here.

pp. 34-35. National Geographic magazine, October 2012.
Photo © Brent Stirton
Caption on the spread: Bodies are what remain in Cameroon’s Biuba Ndjidah National Park after one of the largest mass elephant slaughters in decades. Armed with grenades and AK-47s, poachers killed more than 300.

Brent Stirton is a South African photographer based in New York and a regular contributor to National Geographic magazine. He is represented by Reportage by Getty Images. Stirton won a First Prize in the Nature Stories category in the 2012 World Press Photo for his Rhino Wars  series, which was also photographed for the National Geographic magazine.

Rémi Ochlik’s Revolutions

“War is worse than drugs. One moment it’s a bad trip, a nightmare. But the next moment, as soon as the immediate danger has passed, there is an overpowering desire to go back for more. To risk one’s life in order to get more pictures in return for not very much. It is an incomprehensible force that pushes us to keep going back in.”

Rmi Ochlik, 2004

This spring, after French war photographer Rmi Ochlik was killed during fighting in Homs, Syria, a group of close friends and colleagues felt their obligations to the photographer weren’t complete. Meeting aboard a TGV train on their way to Paris from the World Press awards ceremony in Amsterdam in late April, the group took stock of everything that had happened since Rmi’s death. find personal injury attorney . His photographs had spoken for themselves when exhibited in tribute in Amsterdam. The large circle of friends gathered in his name was a testament to his character; he was always the guy who would make friends sharing a cigarette. But one duty remained unfinishednot a tribute, nor a memorial, but a commitment to continue what was and what should have been in Rmi’s life.

Now, five months later, Revolutions is finisheda book of 144 pages, across which Rmi’s photographs of the Arab Spring spread forth. The tome depicts hope, anger, celebration and fearsome of humanity’s most powerful emotions recorded in photographsand feelings the photographer undoubtedly felt during a career cut short by the harsh realities often facing those documenting armed conflict.

Scattered through this visual record of Rmi’s witness are the words of friends, which encompass close confidants, long-time coworkers and fellow photographers. Their testimonies are short, speaking to the memories of a man killed at a time and place in the world many photographers hesitated to cover.

Ochlikbegan his photography of the Arab Spring in Tunisiaand so the book does the same. “It is impressive to see the ease with which he moves through the street as the rocks fly everywhere,” writes Julien De Rosa of his shared time with Rmi outside Tahrir Square in Cairo. “This is clearly his natural environment.”

Rmi, considered by colleagues an old-school photographer despite his youngage (29), moved with confidence and resolve through the borders of conflict in the Middle East. This is what makes his death that much more painful, for at his age and with his skill, his potential had seemed limitless.

“Be safe, okay?” were the last words that Gert Van Langendonck told Rmi before his final trip to the besieged city of Homs. “You’ve already won your World Press Photo.” And indeed Rmi’s work was deserving of high honorhis story from Libya earned him first prize in the 2012 World Press Photo competition’s General News category. His photographic eye was strongstrengthening, evenas he entered Syria. A vision deserving of high honor, cut short by a barrage of shelling that also killed American correspondent Marie Colvin.

Rmi was often aware that he didn’t have a personal project in the works, Van Langendonck told TIME. Personal projects provide an outlet for photographers to explore their interests outside of commissioned editorial work, allowing for an inner-consistency even as a photographer’s surroundings are rapidly changing. So caught up in his work, Remi didn’t need it “I’ve never had so many of my pictures published in my life,” he told Van Langendonck.

After paying the ultimate price for his work, Rmi’s personal project became clear. Although the future promise of the French photographer will never be fully realized, the publishing of Revolutions has brought a modicum of closure.

Revolutions is nowavailable through Emphas.is. The book project, funded by contributors, raised $24,250 as of Sept. 4, exceeding its original fundraising target of $15,000 by almost 40%.

Malcolm Browne: The Story Behind The Burning Monk

Photographer Malcolm Browne, known for his shocking and iconic image of a self-immolating monk in Saigon, died on Monday at the age of 81. Browne was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting as well as the World Press Photo of the Year in 1963.Last year, Browne spoke with TIME international picture editor Patrick Witty from his home in Vermont.

Patrick Witty: What was happening in Vietnam leading up to the day you took your famous photograph of Quang Duc’s self-immolation?

Malcolm Browne: I had been in Vietnam at that point for a couple of years when things began to look ugly in central Vietnam. I took a much greater interest in the Buddhists of Vietnam than I had before, because it seemed to me they were likely to be movers and shakers in whatever turned up next. I came to be on friendly terms with quite a lot of the monks who were leaders of this movement that was taking shape.

AP

AP correspondent Malcolm Browne in 1965

Along about springtime (1963), the monks began to hint that they were going to pull off something spectacular by way of protestand that would most likely be a disembowelment of one of the monks or an immolation. And either way, it was something we had to pay attention to.

At that point the monks were telephoning the foreign correspondents in Saigon to warn them that something big was going to happen. Most of the correspondents were kind of bored with that threat after a while and tended to ignore it. I felt that they were certainly going to do something, that they were not just bluffing, so it came to be that I was really the only Western correspondent that covered the fatal day.

PW: Tell me about that morning. You certainly weren’t expecting something so dramatic but you felt drawn because of a call the night before?

MB: I had some hint that it would be something spectacular, because I knew these monks were not bluffing. They were perfectly serious about doing something pretty violent. In another civilization it might have taken the form of a bomb or something like that.

The monks were very much aware of the result that an immolation was likely to have. So by the time I got to the pagoda where all of this was being organized, it was already underwaythe monks and nuns were chanting a type of chant that’s very common at funerals and so forth. At a signal from the leader, they all started out into the street and headed toward the central part of Saigon on foot. When we reached there, the monks quickly formed a circle around a precise intersection of two main streets in Saigon. A car drove up. Two young monks got out of it. An older monk, leaning a little bit on one of the younger ones, also got out. He headed right for the center of the intersection. The two young monks brought up a plastic jerry can, which proved to be gasoline. As soon as he seated himself, they poured the liquid all over him. He got out a matchbook, lighted it, and dropped it in his lap and was immediately engulfed in flames. linkwheel creation . Everybody that witnessed this was horrified. It was every bit as bad as I could have expected.

I don’t know exactly when he died because you couldn’t tell from his features or voice or anything. He never yelled out in pain. His face seemed to remain fairly calm until it was so blackened by the flames that you couldn’t make it out anymore. Finally the monks decided he was dead and they brought up a coffin, an improvised wooden coffin.

PW: And you were the only photographer there?

MB: As far as I could tell, yes. It turns out that there were some Vietnamese that took some pictures but they didn’t go outthey’re not on the wires or anything like that.

PW: What were you thinking while you were looking through the camera?

MB: I was thinking only about the fact it was a self-illuminated subject that required an exposure of about, oh say, f10 or whatever it was, I don’t really remember. I was using a cheap Japanese camera, by the name of Petri. I was very familiar with it, but I wanted to make sure that I not only got the settings right on the camera each time and focused it properly, but that also I was reloading fast enough to keep up with action.I took about ten rolls of film because I was shooting constantly.

PW: How did you feel?

MB: The main thing on my mind was getting the pictures out. I realized this is something of unusual importance and that I’d have to get them to the AP in one of its far flung octopus tentacles as soon as possible. And I also knew this was a very difficult thing to do in Saigon on short notice.

PW: What did you do with the film?

MB: The whole trick was to get it to some transmission point. We had to get the raw film shipped by air freight, or some way. It was not subject to censorship at that point. We used a pigeon to get it as far as Manila. And in Manila they had the apparatus to send it by radio.

PW: When you say pigeon, what do you mean exactly?

MB: A pigeon is a passenger on a regular commercial flight whom you have persuaded to carry a little package for him. Speed was of the essence obviously. So we had to get it to the airport. It got aboard a flight leaving very soon for Manila.

PW: Did anyone from the AP, once the film arrived, send a message to you saying that the picture was being published all over the world?

MB: No.

PW: You didn’t know?

MB: No, we didn’t know, it was like shooting into a black hole. We learned that it had arrived only after messages began to come through congratulating us for sending such a picture. It was not run by everybody. The New York Times did not run it. They felt it was too grisly a picture that wasn’t suitable for a breakfast newspaper.

PW: I’m looking at the picture now on my screen. Tell me what I’m not seeing what are you hearing, smelling?

MB: The overwhelming smell of joss sticks. They do make a very strong smell, not a particularly nice smell, but it’s meant to appease the ancestors and all of that. That was the overwhelming smell except for the smell of burning gasoline and diesel and the smell of burning flesh, I must say. The main sound was the wailing and misery of the monks, who had known this guy for many years before and were feeling for him. Then there was shouting over loudspeakers between the fire department people, trying to figure out a way to put him out, put out the flames around him without actually killing him or something. So it was a jumble of confusion.

PW: I read once what President Kennedy said about your photograph. He said, “No news picture in history has generated so much emotion around the world as that one.”

MB: Yeah, that could be, that sounds like an honest quote from the White House.

PW: Would you consider the photograph your crown achievement in journalism?

MB:It attracted a lot of attention, I’ll say that for it. It was not necessarily the hardest story I’ve ever had to cover, but it was certainly an important part of my career.

Into Oblivion: Documenting the Memory Loss from Alzheimer’s

On her first visit to the French hospital in 2007, photographerMaja Danielsnoticed two elderly residents trying to get her attention through the port-hole-shaped windows of a hallway door. Links backlinks blog comments . The door, she later discovered, was the entrance to a locked Alzheimers ward and the patients who lived there were to become the subjects of a three-year documentary-photography project that recently helped earn Daniels a spot in the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass a mentorship program organized by World Press Photo.

The final collection of photographs of the ward and its residents, titledInto Oblivion,is an effort to convey the daily life and struggles of the French Alzheimers patients, while also bringing up issues surrounding geriatric care.I want to motivate people to think about current care policies and the effects it can have on somebodys life, Daniels said.

Because Alzheimers disease causes memory loss and confusion, Daniels could not get consent directly from the patients she photographed. Instead, she spent nearly two years clearing authorizations with the hospital and the families and legal guardians of the residents. Daniels also had to consider the ethics of documenting subjects who were not able to fully understand what she was doing.I felt very uncomfortable at times, she said. I justified my presence by spending most of the time in the ward with the residents, just like any other volunteer.

Daniels spent many hours just sitting with residents while she tried to find a dignified way to present them and their situation. The end result of these efforts is a collection of simply composed photographs that are both beautiful and heartbreaking.

Chipped and worn from years of escape attempts, the door through which Daniels originally encountered the ward is a central theme in her photographs. Residents are pictured peeking through its glass, rapping on its windowpanes or jiggling its white plastic handle.

Sometimes a resident can remain by the door for hours trying to open it, Daniels explained. It becomes the center of attention by the residents who wonder why it is closed and why they are unable to open it.

After completing the series, Daniels shared her pictures with the French ward’s staff and residents’ families. Shenoted that staff members were surprised by the photographs of the door. They had never contemplated its symbolic value and had just seen it as a necessity, said Daniels. “The images led to important discussions around notions such as care and selfhood.”

Maja Daniels is a London-based photographer. She was recently chosen to participate in the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam. See more of her work here.