Tag Archives: Work In Progress

Brighton Photo Fringe Photo Stroll Part One – Jinkyun Ahn, The Photocopy Club and The Unphotographable with Farnham student Catherine Symons

Trying to get work together for the Brighton Photo Fringe with Tri-pod and our work-in-progress show IS THAT IT (more to come later), plus moving and looking for work has been full on.

I’m now based in Brighton, for the time being, and while I find my feet, I asked Farnham student Catherine Symons, who attended the press view, to cover it for the blog. It’s great to get another perspective, let go and allow someone else the space to preview the shows…

So, I now hand over to Catherine for the first of two posts.

 ON THE SURFACE OF IMAGES – JINKYUN AHN

Confrontation 1 from On The Surface Of Images © Jinkyun Ahn. Photo courtesy of the artist and The Phoenix Brighton

On Saturday 6 October the Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 was launched, starting at Phoenix Brighton. Phoenix Brighton is used this year to showcase OPEN 2012.  Over 100 submissions were received and On The Surface Of Images by Korean photographer Jinkyun Ahn was selected as the winner by Clare Grafik, Susanna Brown and Oliver Chanarin.

Photographer Jinkyun Ahn in conversation with Afshin Dehkordi, Photograph by Catherine Symons

Ahn’s first major solo exhibition On The Surface Of Images shows his photographic work on the subject of his parents, looking at the theme of mortality. “The empty plot that my parents prepared for their after-life is an image of death that will be fixed eternally in the landscape, as well as, in my mind.” From the artist’s statement.

Photographs by Catherine Symons

Walking around the exhibition, there is the experience of the different elements and processes that Ahn went through in his mind when making this body of work. He comments on the distance and isolation he experienced through showing the fragmenting of his parents with their faces darkened or dismembered in different ways.

On The Surface Of Images runs until 18 November.

THE PHOTOCOPY CLUB

Photos Catherine Symons.

The fifth exhibition from The Photocopy Club is on show at The Phoenix Brighton. The Brighton-based company opened in 2011 with the aim to have six bi-monthly open submission exhibitions. The idea behind this organization is to take photographs from the internet and instead put them into the public’s hands.

100 photographers work is displayed on chipboard, including envelopes and notes sent in, which adds a rawness to the project. Bringing together a variety of different images, the aesthetic of the work allows the tactile nature of the photograph to come back into play and for the work to be disseminated to a wider audience.

This show is followed by the exhibition DUO hosted by WEARELUCKY/HOLYGHOST – a show looking at the work of four pairs of young photographers. Details of their next submission exhibition can be found at The Photocopy Club deadline 18 November.

UNPHOTOGRAPHABLE – MICHAEL DAVID MURPHY & THE ENTENTE

© Michael David Murphy & The Entente

Brighton Photo Fringe designers, Michael David Murphy and The Entente invited members of the public to contribute to their work, whereby they take elements of the unphotographable and combine this with text.

Photo by Catherine Symons

“Opportunities missed.  Simple failures.  Occasions when I wished I’d taken the picture, or not forgotten the camera, or had been brave enough to click the shutter.” Michael David Murphy.

The result is a graphical representation of what would have been and is achieved through combining bold black text with coloured symbols. The text and symbols give the viewer a snippet of the whole image and engaging the viewer’s imagination to allow them to determine the image that they would like to see.

Allow your imagination to run free with this thought-provoking installation.

All shows at The Phoenix Brighton. Open Tues-Sun 11:00-17:00.

Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Festivals Tagged: Afshin Dehkordi, Catherine Symons, Jinkyun Ahn, Michael David Murphy, On The Surface Of Images, Phoenix Brighton, The Entente, The Photocopy Club, The Unphotographable

The Girls of Chechnya

In 2010, when she was working for a news agency in Moscow, Diana Markosian asked to be sent to Chechnya. The photographer, who is Russian but studied in the United States, was 20 years old and curious about the history of the embattled region.

“They wouldn’t send me so I decided to go by myself,” she remembers. “Grozny became my destination and later became my home.”

Markosian went back repeatedly after that first visit and soon became a specialist in covering a region where, she says, many of her colleagues don’t want to go. She moved to Chechnya last November to live there full-time. But, she says, her close relationship with the area doesn’t mean that it’s not a risky place to live and work—kidnappings are frequent, she says—or that such risk does not affect her photographs. Although Russian leaders declared the region normalized and peaceful three years ago today, following more than a decade of wars against rebels, life is still fraught. They may not appear in the frames, but Chechen authorities are the unseen presence in the work shown in this gallery, a personal project through which Markosian addresses the lives of girls growing up in Chechnya.

“It’s one thing to come here for a week like I used to do. It’s another to start living here, and not only hear what these women are going through but actually experience it yourself,” she says.

Markosian says that Chechnya has experienced a wave of Islamicization since the collapse of the Soviet Union: religious dress codes are mandatory, young (and polygamous) marriages are frequent and gender roles are increasingly conservative. The president, Ramzan Kadyrov, has said publicly that women are the property of their husbands. And at the same time, high unemployment has meant that many young women who are already becoming mothers still live with their own parents.

For Markosian, this has meant that—after she was told by security officers that her belt full of lenses made her look like a suicide bomber—she carries a handbag rather than the photographer’s gear bag to which she was accustomed, and that she has gotten used to being questioned or having her photographs deleted by officers. “As a regular citizen I don’t feel danger,” she says, “but just because I’m doing something a little out of the ordinary, especially for a woman, I’m looked at more carefully.”

It has also changed her working process. Because of what she says is widespread but justified distrust, people are wary of being shown doing anything that could be perceived as unusual. Something as seemingly innocent as a photograph of a woman smoking a cigarette could have dire consequences. The fear of being different has been a particular obstacle for photographing teenagers, as their parents are worried about what might happen if their children are seen as nonconforming.

But Markosian says that, by spending weeks with her subjects before taking a single photograph, she has been able to gain the access necessary for the project. And, in doing so, she says she has found these women to be a mirror for Chechnya as a whole. “That entire idea of a generation building itself and the resilience these girls have really motivated me,” she says. “They are trying to make something of themselves at the same time that this region is trying to build after almost two decades of war.”

Diana Markosian is a photographer based in Chechnya. See more of her work here.

Aline Smithson: Converging Conversations

Sharing a work-in-progress series titled, Converging Conversations. I tend to make work that tells stories, but I have been also shooting images that are non-specific, more about color or gesture or emotion–I have been thinking about those moments when you are lost in thought, yet not really thinking about anything…

Converging Conversations is a series about juxtaposing unrelated images in order to create a new conversation or narrative. It is a conversation that is a convergence of ideas and associations, open to personal interpretation. The result is something completely separate from the original intent of the image making.

My initial focus in creating many of these photographs was to capture a sense of disconnectedness, a sense of day dreaming, and in some cases, a sense of nothingness–images that capture moments or gestures, moving back and forth between a place that is tangible and a place on the periphery of my memory and experience. By combining these images, a new narrative begins and the photographs become animated in conversation.

Monika Merva

When checking to find the results of the Center of Fine Art Photography’s Portrait Exhibition, jurored by the impeccable gallerist, Anna Walker Skillman, of Jackson Fine Art in Atlanta, I truly moved by Monika Merva’s winning image. Monika’s project, City of Children, was published by Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg—Berlin in 2011 and the work has been well celebrated. Today, however, I am sharing some of Monika’s other work–portraits and a new project that is in the beginning stages and without a statement. I am also sharing some of her wonderful portraits.

Her image, Doki, won first prize at the C4FAP, but also garnered 2nd place Second Place at the 2011 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition. Monikas’s work is represented in the permanent collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris; Hungarian Museum of Photography, Kecskemét; Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Work in Progress

Doki

Portraits

The "Emerging" Photographer Bursary Award

Spectrum, Garage Studios and Photoworks are sponsoring an exciting new bursary: the winner will receive a heavyweight package of tuition and mentoring, studio time, and a fully promoted exhibition.

The Bursary will include:

*1 full day of studio lighting tuition at Garage studios with one of our experienced tutors worth over £550

*7 days of studio and lighting hire at Garage Studios, with a lighting assistant provided to support you on your shoots worth over £2800.

*1 day of mentoring from Photowork’s Emma Morris, which will include discussion on creating a cohesive project, and understanding artistic practice with a view to how this can be applied to a studio environment.

*£1000 worth of Spectrum goods and services to be used for the final exhibition (including any film processing, scanning, printing mounting and framing you may need).

* An Introductory visit to Spectrum who will be on hand throughout the bursary to offer technical printing help and guidance.

*1 Full days use of one of Spectrum’s top of the range calibrated monitors, to ensure you colour management is spot-on before printing.

* A two week exhibition which will be promoted by all three companies, and held at Garage Studios in September worth approx £3,000.

To apply for the bursary all applicants should submit a 300–500 word submission document describing the proposed studio based project and how you envisage it developing. All applicants must also submit a minimum of 3 images of previous work, alongside a current CV to showcase their work. The organisers are of course aware that this is for emerging talent so images submitted may be either work in progress or non studio based imagery but please consider how the images will support your proposal. All applications must be received by 12pm on Monday 2 May, no entries will be accepted after this time.

The judges, Emma Morris of Photoworks and Spectrum-appointed judge Simon Roberts, will view all applicants submission and images and will pick one overall winner of the Bursary Award.

For more information and to apply visit: www.garage-studios.co.uk

The "Emerging" Photographer Bursary Award

Spectrum, Garage Studios and Photoworks are sponsoring an exciting new bursary: the winner will receive a heavyweight package of tuition and mentoring, studio time, and a fully promoted exhibition.

The Bursary will include:

*1 full day of studio lighting tuition at Garage studios with one of our experienced tutors worth over £550

*7 days of studio and lighting hire at Garage Studios, with a lighting assistant provided to support you on your shoots worth over £2800.

*1 day of mentoring from Photowork’s Emma Morris, which will include discussion on creating a cohesive project, and understanding artistic practice with a view to how this can be applied to a studio environment.

*£1000 worth of Spectrum goods and services to be used for the final exhibition (including any film processing, scanning, printing mounting and framing you may need).

* An Introductory visit to Spectrum who will be on hand throughout the bursary to offer technical printing help and guidance.

*1 Full days use of one of Spectrum’s top of the range calibrated monitors, to ensure you colour management is spot-on before printing.

* A two week exhibition which will be promoted by all three companies, and held at Garage Studios in September worth approx £3,000.

To apply for the bursary all applicants should submit a 300–500 word submission document describing the proposed studio based project and how you envisage it developing. All applicants must also submit a minimum of 3 images of previous work, alongside a current CV to showcase their work. The organisers are of course aware that this is for emerging talent so images submitted may be either work in progress or non studio based imagery but please consider how the images will support your proposal. All applications must be received by 12pm on Monday 2 May, no entries will be accepted after this time.

The judges, Emma Morris of Photoworks and Spectrum-appointed judge Simon Roberts, will view all applicants submission and images and will pick one overall winner of the Bursary Award.

For more information and to apply visit: www.garage-studios.co.uk