Tag Archives: W Eugene Smith

Interviews and Talks | October 2012

VII Photo’s International Director Nick Papadopoulos shared practical advice  for young photographers at a Canon talk in Perpignan… Canon Professional Network put the main points on their website… Includes good tips also from some of the VII members…Worth reading  by photographers young and old in my opinion…

Nick Papadopoulos (VII) : practical advice for young photographers (CPN)

Really good hour long talk Lynsey Addario gave at Side Gallery in Newcastle earlier this autumn…

Lynsey Addario (Side Gallery Vimeo) Lynsey Addario discussing her photographic practice and ‘Veiled Rebellion’ exhibiton at Side Gallery, which looks at the lives of women in Afghanistan. | 55mins

Prison Photography’s Pete Brook interviewed VII photographers who shot for the agency’s and NYC based advocacy group Think Outside The Cell’s collaborative project…

Ed Kashi   (Prison Photography)

Ron Haviv  (Prison Photography)

Ashley Gilbertson (Prison Photography)

Jessica Dimmock  (Prison Photography)

Stephanie Sinclair on NBC photoblog on her child brides project

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair (NBC)

Stephanie Sinclair (World Press Photo on Vimeo)

Ron Haviv (WBEZ on Soundcloud)

Joachim Ladefoged (Digital Pro Photo magazine)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Emaho Magazine)

Gary Knight and co talked about their Bosnia book in Perpignan… CPN shares the points on their site…

Gary Knight, Jon Jones, Tom Stoddart and Rémy Ourdan revisit Bosnia (CPN)

Peter Turnley (YouTube)

Pete Souza (MSNBC)

Teun Voeten interviewed about his book Narco Estado on the BBC World Service (Panos)

Terric talk by David Burnett at PhotoShelter’s recent Luminance event.

David Burnett (PhotoShelter)

Jeremy Bowen (Guardian)

Reuters photographers Jorge Silva and Carlos Garcia Rawlins on photographing Hugo Chavez (YouTube)

Donna Ferrato interview in burn magazine…

Conversation with Donna Ferrato (Burn)

Alessio Romenzi (LA Times Framework blog)

Katrin Koenning (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Peter diCampo : Everyday Africa (NYT Lens)

Poulomi Basu (Theworld.org)

David LaChapelle (PDN)

Phaidon interviewed Peter van Agtmael relating to his W. Eugene Smith Grant awarded project Disco Night September 11…

Ten Questions for photographer Peter van Agtmael (Phaidon)

Mark Power : From Poland, With Love (themuse.com)

Steve McCurry video, on location in Ethiopia (Phaidon)

Bruce Gilden (ASX)

Jake Chessum (A Photo Editor)

Video interview with William Klein to coincide with his exhibition at Tate Modern in London…

William Klein (Youtube)

Daido Moriyama (Youtube)

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art on William Klein + Daido Moriyama: Double Feature (Lightbox)

Susan Bright (YouTube)

Good Simon Norfolk interview…I don’t always agree with what he says,  but I do like the fact he doesn’t mince any words…

Photo © Simon Norfolk. From the project “Burke + Norfolk”

Simon Norfolk (FK Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz (Youtube)

A Conversation with Richard Misrach and Kate Orff : Petrochemical America (Aperture)

Alejandro Cartagena (A Photo Editor)

Interview with Jason Eskenazi on “Wonderland: A Fairytale of the Soviet Monolith” – A 10-Year Odyssey Around the Former Soviet Union (erickimphotography)

A Conversation with Danny Wilcox Frazier on Facing Change: Documenting America (Leica blog)

The National photo blog has been a great find…

AP photographer Manu Brabo talks about his time in Syria and covering conflicts (The National)

Daniel Etter : Witnessing Syria’s Descent Into War (Newsweek Photo Dept Tumblr)

A conversation with Neville Elder-Photographer and Film-maker (Broadbentius blog)

Ewen Spencer in Guardian’s ‘best shot’ series…

Photo © Ewen Spencer

Ewen Spencer’s best photograph: MCs at a UK garage rave (Guardian)

Ewen Spencer (BBC)

Dana Popa (Photo Parley blog)

Photo © Franco Pagetti

Franco Pagetti – From Fashion to the Frontline (Emaho Magazine)

Sebastian Rich : From war zones, photographer brings scars and searing images (NBC)

Teru Kuwayama (PhoNar)

Benjamin Chesterton (PhoNar)

Victor Cobo (Foam)

Niall McDiarmid (Document Scotland)

Maroeskja Lavigne (Word Magazine)

Martin Parr introducing us to his new book…

Martin Parr presents Life’s a Beach (Aperture Vimeo)

Photo Raw magazine’s video interview with Parr…

Martin Parr (Photo Raw)

Alec Soth (LayFlat.org)

Simon Roberts (YouTube)

Danfung Dennis (YouTube)

Brian Smith: Secrets of Great Portrait Photography (PhotoShelter webinar)

Brian Smith on How to Take Better Portraits (B&H blog)

I don’t consider myself a gearhead, but I do sometimes enjoy reading about what others have in their bags…

John Stanmeyer : What’s The Kit (Photographer’s blog)

From Photo Brigade…

In My Bags – by Robert Caplin (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Dominick Reuter (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Eric Thayer (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Keith Bedford (Photo Brigade)

David Bailey‘s India: the long click goodbye (Guardian)

Interview with Maciej Dakowicz on his “Cardiff After Dark” book Published by Thames & Hudson (erickimphotography)

Maciej Dakowicz (BBC)

Jim Mortram’s Small Town Inertia (BBC)

Tom Wood (BBC)

Tom Wood (Guardian)

Laia Abril on the Fabrica Artist Residency (PDN)

Mario Testino interview: the man who makes models super (Guardian)

Mikhail Baryshnikov (NYT Lens)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | October 2012

Deadlines

International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña : October 31

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2012 : October 31

PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Awards : November 1

Pikto Top Pick Photo Contest : November 1

Aftermath Project grant : November 5

Prix Lucas Dolega : November 15

Tim Hetherington Grant invites submissions…

Photo © Stephen Ferry

Tim Hetherington Grant : November 15 | Tim Hetherington Grant invites photojournalist submissions (BJP)

Terry O’Neill/Tag Award 2012 : November 22

Agence Française de Développement Photo Contest : November 23

Nieman Fellowships : International entries December 1 | US entries January 31

John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford : International entries December 1 | US entries January 15

FotoVisura Photography Grant : December 15

Flash Forward 2013 Call for Submissions : December 31

Environmental Photographer of the Year : December 31

Magnum Foundation Human Rights Fellowship for the 2013 NYU-MF Photography and Human Rights Program : December 17

World Press Photo Multimedia Contest : January 10

Noorderlicht Photofestival 2013 : January 11

World Press Photo 2013 : Deadline January 17 | deadline for requesting user name and password January 11| press release on the jury and categories

Photo seen © Ami Vitale. Alexia Foundation professional grant winner in 2000.

Alexia Foundation Grant : January 18 2013

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23  2013

Nikon Photo Contest : February 28 2013

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients

Big congratulations to Peter van Agtmael, winner of this year’s W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund Grant for Humanistic Photography

Photo © Peter van Agtmael

The W. Eugene Smith Awards: Winners and Finalists (New Yorker) | Peter van Agtmael Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant (PDN) | Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography (Lightbox) | ‘Seeing Iraq and Afghanistan, Unembedded’ (NYT Lens)

Frontline Club Award 2012 Photojournalism category winner:  18 days with Syrian Rebels by Goran Tomasevic for Reuters.

“Unparalleled combat photography.” -Jon Lee Anderson

Photo © Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The winners of the Frontline Club Awards 2012

Aris Messinis wins Bayeux-Calvados Photography Prize (BJP) | Les lauréats du Prix Bayeux des correspondants de guerre 2012 sont… (in French) (Prix Bayeux) | AFP journalist Aris Messinis wins the Photography Prize at the Bayeux-Calvados Awards for War Correspondents (AFP)

The Rory Peck Awards Finalists

Liz Hingley wins first Prix Virginia (BJP)

Ambush; Ramadi, Iraq, 22 July 2006 © Luc Delahaye

2012 Prix Pictet winner Luc Delahaye – in pictures (Guardian) | Luc Delahaye wins Prix Pictet photography prize (BJP)

Prix Pictet prize, Saatchi Gallery, SW3 : review (London Evening Standard)

Two Photographers Selected for $500,000 MacArthur “Genius” Grants (PetaPixel)

British Journal of Photography wins Lucie Award for Photography Magazine of the Year (BJP)

Alvaro Deprit and Nikolai Ishchuk win BJP’s IPA

Guardian Student Media awards 2012 Finalists

2012 CGAP Photo Contest Winners

IdeasTap Photographic Award 2012: the finalists

Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography

On Wednesday night, Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael received the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, joining a legion of photojournalists that includes James Nachtwey, Paolo Pellegrin and Brenda Ann Kenneally. Established in 1978, the W. Eugene Smith Grant is one of the most esteemed in the industry, named after the legendary photographer whose harrowing pictures of World War II gave an unparalleled and poignant view of the human toll of the conflict. In a fitting tribute, the annual grant aims to recognize a photographerwho has demonstrated an exemplary commitment to documenting the human condition in the spirit of Smiths concerned photography and dedicated compassion.

Van Agtmael has done that with his long-term project, Disco Night September 11, which focuses on the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and their consequences within the United States. But it was his existing work along with his proposalto show the side of the ongoing wars through Iraqi and Afghan perspectivesthat earned him this years honor. An additional $5,000 fellowship was awarded to photographer Massimo Berruti for The Dusty Path, a combination of works examining victims of drone strikes, missing persons and the fight against militancy in Pakistani classrooms.

At 24the same age as many of the soldiers he would go on to documentvan Agtmael began the project during an embed with Americantroops engaged in heavy fighting around Mosul, Iraq.As an American of the generation shouldering these wars, I feel a strong responsibility to document their cost,” says the photographer, whose lens captured everythingfrom violent firefights and days-long foot patrols to the rehabilitation of those maimed by war.”Over the course of my lifetime, I intend to keep returning to [these conflicts] to create a comprehensive document.

To that end, van Agtmael, now 31, plans to use his grant to capture the other side of the conflictto give face to our ‘enemies’ in the fight. “Im ready to shift my focus to the other side of the war,” he says. “The Iraqis and Afghans that have been most affected remain depersonalized and shadowy in our collective consciousness. We live in a self-absorbed cultureone largely unburdened by memory.

Van Agtmael plans to return to Iraq and Afghanistan to follow these stories, but will also travel to the Middle East and Europe in hopes of documenting their diaspora. He’s timed the conclusion of his project to the American withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014another reminder of the human sacrifice and cost of the war. Heplans to use photographs, video, audio and text to share the entire range of what hes witnessed over the last seven years; still, van Agtmael maintains it’s a small shred of the whole. “Most stories will remain forever anonymous, and I’m very grateful to the W. Eugene Smith Grant for the opportunity to document the stories that would otherwise go unseen,” he says. Ive seen a nasty and primal side of mankind, but its been balanced by enough displays of extraordinary humanity to give me hope.”

The $30,000W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography is given once per year along with an additional$5000fellowship to a second recipient. blog comment . LightBox previously featured the work of 2011 Smith Grant Award winner Krisanne Johnson.

W.M. Hunt

Watch the indefatigable W.M. Hunt, a renown collector and dealer, in action. The first video is a montage of clips from a public lecture about The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious, the first major US exhibition of his collection that ran from 1 October 2011 to 19 February 2012 at George Eastman House, from which Aperture and Thames & Hudson simultaneously published a book. The video posted below the fold is from Artlog, wherein he talks about his visceral approach to collecting, acquiring an eye for good work, and his advice for aspiring collectors.

Featured in the current issue of 1000 Words, the photographs of The Unseen Eye have a common theme – the gaze of the subject is averted, the face obscured, or the eyes firmly closed. The images evoke a wide range of emotions and are characterised, by what, at first glance, the subject conceals rather than what the camera reveals. 

W.M. Hunt was a founding partner of the prominent photography gallery HASTED HUNT in Chelsea, Manhatten and served as director of photography at Ricco/Maresca Gallery. He and his collecting have been featured in The New York Times and The Art Newspaper as well as on PBS. He is a professor at the School of Visual Arts and on the Board of Directors of the W.Eugene Smith Memorial Fund and The Center for Photography at Woodstock, N.Y., where he was the recipient of their Vision Award in 2009. He also served on the Board of Directors of AIPAD (Association of International Photography Art Dealers) and as chairman of Photographers + Friends United Against AIDS.

There are many words one can use to describe W.M. Hunt; funny, captivating, even legendary but his eloquence is his own and his book is my personal favourite so I cannot.

“Insist on engagement. Wrestle with what is difficult. Pretty is boring. Seek intensity.” W.M. Hunt

A Year and a Day with Bob Dylan

Fifty years ago today, a young Bob Dylan released his self-titled debut album. In the ensuing years, Dylan has written music and lyrics for some of the most eloquent and acclaimed songs of our generation. A polarizing figure at times, Dylan has been both glorified and vilified in the media, all the while proving to be a constant moving target—often cryptic, sometimes playful, intensely private but always enigmatic. His life and work have been obsessively analyzed, dissected and pored over by critics and fans alike. Yet Dylan has refused to be labeled—neither protest singer nor folk singer—or pinned down to be understood. Despite the scrutiny, famous relationships (including one with folk singer Joan Baez), a mysterious motorcycle crash and his subsequent reclusion from the accident, and the constant touring, Dylan, the troubadour, has marched to his own beat.

Dylan Rock Explosion, a new exhibition at Cité de la Musique in Paris, tracks the pivotal path of Dylan’s development from 1961-1966. The show, which runs through July 15, features photographs and films—and related ephemera—that capture the young Dylan as he came to prominence and sparked a musical revolution. Featured in the exhibition is photographer Daniel Kramer, who documented the musician during the span of one year and one day from 1964-1965, a period in which Dylan shifted from acoustic to electric guitar.

Kramer had no idea who Bob Dylan was before he noticed him perform “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” on the Steve Allen television show in 1964. “I hadn’t heard or seen him,” the photographer told TIME. “I didn’t know his name, but I was riveted by the power of the song’s message of social outrage and to see Dylan reporting like a journalist through his music and lyrics.” Kramer says he was taken by the fact that the 23-year-old Dylan could get up alone with his one instrument and capture us through his music, lyrics and presentation. “Being a photographer my response was—that’s someone you want to photograph,” he says. Kramer found out who Dylan’s management was and contacted them, only to be told Dylan wasn’t available. It took Kramer six months to negotiate and secure a one hour portrait session in Woodstock with Dylan; that session ultimately ran to five hours. An invitation for Kramer to travel by car with Dylan to a performance at Town Hall Philadelphia immediately followed. Kramer then photographed Dylan during the next 367 days.

“It was my idea, my story and I did it totally on my own hook,” says Kramer of the first self-initiated session with Dylan. “I didn’t want any money. I just wanted the opportunity to do the story and then we see where we go. Interestingly, when I first started photographing Dylan, a lot of places were not interested in using his pictures because he was on the verge of becoming very, very important—but still just on the verge. Within six months the photographs started finding homes. Everyone eventually picked them up: Look, Saturday Post and, internationally, Paris Match.

The work was also responsible for introducing Kramer to W. Eugene Smith, which ultimately led to a lasting friendship. The legendary photographer helped bring attention to the work after becoming enamored with Kramer’s photographs. At the time, Smith was coincidentally looking for an essay to work on as an editor. Kramer’s images of Dylan would be that project. “He was like a midwife to the project,” Kramer says. A book—the first about Dylan—edited with Smith, written by Kramer and featuring 140 photographs from that period was published in 1967. Today, Kramer’s images have graced the covers of three Bob Dylan albums—Biograph, Bringing It All back Home and Highway 61 Revisited.

“I photographed a lot of wonderful and tremendously exciting subjects in my career, but Dylan remains one of the few at very the top of my list,” Kramer says. “I have always admired his courage as a performer who—as he wrote once in one of his books—steps out. He’s said incredible things and moved a lot of people. His lyrics and music have had an amazing influence on his time, and for a photographer, this is always great when you have an opportunity to document a part of that.”

Photographer Daniel Kramer is based in New York. His images have graced the covers of three Bob Dylan albums—Biograph, Bringing It All back Home, and Highway 61 Revisited. His work has also been published in LIFE, TIME, Fortune and other publications. In addition to documenting Bob Dylan, he photographed Norman Mailer extensively over a three-year period.

The exhibition Bob Dylan, Rock Explosion is on view at Cité De La Musique in Paris from March 6 – July 15. For more classic photos of Bob Dylan, see LIFE’s 96-page book, Forever Young: 50 Years of Song, on newsstands now.

Photographer #431: Darcy Padilla

Darcy Padilla, 1965, USA, is a photojournalist and documentary photographer. Her career as a freelance photographer started after completing 12 internships at daily newspapers as The New York Times and The Washington Post. Since then she covered stories in Cuba and Haiti, on Aids in Prison and the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, just to name a few. Her most acclaimed body of work is The Julie Project. This long-term project is the story of a woman called Julie Baird. Eighteen years Darcy followed and photographed the story of AIDS, drug abuse, abusive relationships, poverty and death. Julie died on September 27th, 2010 at the age of 36, after having lived a turbulant life in which she gave birth to six children of whom the first five were taken away from her. It is an impressive, heartbreaking project with a dramatic, yet expected ending. The series rightfully received the W. Eugene Smith Award for Humanistic Photography in 2010. Amongst other awards for her work is the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for the work she did photographing residents of transient hotels in one of the poorest neighborhoods in San Francisco. All of the following images are from The Julie Project.

Website: www.darcypadilla.com

The Unseen Eye…A Life in Photography and Other Digressions

Poster photographed and designed by Gerald Slota for W.M. Hunt and Aperture, © Gerald Slota

In conjunction with his new book The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious, W.M. – Bill – Hunt has created a special performance piece suggested by his text for the book.

This monologue with projections and video will consist of ruminations on his many years of collecting and a life in photographs. Mr. Hunt has been a collector since his early years as an actor. He has been a fundraiser (Photographers + Friends United Against AIDS, The Center for Photography at Woodstock and the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund), a dealer (Ricco/Maresca Gallery and his own Hasted Hunt) as well as a writer and teacher.

Hunt is known for his wit and sometimes larger than life personality. This evening is one of information and digression. He hopes to bring into the light many of the names and stories left out of book.

The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious presents an idiosyncratic and compelling collection of photographs assembled around a particular theme: magical, heart stopping images of people in which the eyes are obscured, veiled, or otherwise hidden. The gaze of the subject is averted. The pictures present a catalog of anti-portraiture, characterized at first glance by what its subjects conceal, not by what the camera reveals.

Amassed over the course of almost forty years by Hunt, the collection includes works by masters such as Richard Avedon, Diane Arbus, Imogen Cunningham, William Klein, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Robert Frank as well as lesser known artists and vernacular images. Hunt’s instinctive pursuit of striking images has resulted in a collection that manages to evoke a picture of humanity from birth to death, with all the associated nuances of memory, wit, eroticism, fear, grief, and horror.

More than three hundred and fifty intensely evocative and frequently surreal images are brilliantly sequenced in this volume—the cumulative effect is unnerving and riveting. Most critically, the images are drawn together by the narrative of the collector himself—a highly personal monologue that weaves throughout the book, in which Hunt offers his own perceptive responses to the images he has gathered over many years. The end result is a series of surprising epiphanies about how and why one collects. This volume is a must for anyone who collects or has considered putting together a collection of his or her own.

W.M. Hunt is a frequent lecturer on collecting, a well known dealer and an adjunct professor at the School of Visual Arts, New York. An earlier exhibition of his collection launched to critical acclaim at the Rencontres d’Arles de la Photographie in 2005 before traveling to the Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland, and FOAM, Amsterdam. An exhibition of 550 works, The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Collection of W. M. Hunt will be on view at the George Eastman House from Oct.1 2011 to February 19 2012.

Exhibition on view:
George Eastman House, Rochester, New York: October 1, 2011- February 19, 2012

Performance by Bill Hunt:
Aperture Gallery and Bookstore: Friday, October 28, 2011
Doors at 6:30 pm, Performance at 7:00 pm

[email protected]

Click here to read an interview of W.M. Hunt in At Length magazine.

Krisanne Johnson Awarded the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography

Coming of age for Swazi girls is tough. A tiny African nation of one million, Swaziland is ruled by one of the world’s last remaining absolute monarchies. Its age-old tradition of polygamy and its relaxed attitude toward sexuality have met in a devastating combination for women: Swaziland reports the highest percentage of HIV positive people in the world, with young women being affected most. Half of young Swazi women are HIV positive, and life expectancy has dropped from 61 years to almost 31 years over the past ten years.

Every year, young maidens from across the country gather for the Umhlanga dance, an eight-day ceremony in honor of the Queen Mother to celebrate their virginity. I first went to Swaziland in 2006 to document this annual dance and other coming of age rites of young women living amid a spreading disease and its victims—women who, even in the face of such staggering odds and deep uncertainty, still possess all the energy and enthusiasm of youth. My goal was to capture the nuances that comprise a human, rather than simply tragic, experience.

Over the past five years, the progression of this work has moved from traditional rites of passage to modern youth culture to an intimate look inside the homes of HIV-positive women. My insights have matured along with these young women. It has allowed me to witness fast-tracked intimacy and friends lost and gained. It has made me see that girls here are constantly on the verge––of giving birth to burying best friends, of finding love to fighting for life alone, stigmatized and heartbroken.

These moments in my interactions with young Swazi women remind me of the complicated, frustrating, and deeply human nature of their predicaments, choices and desires. I’ve seen childhood friends reconnect across beds in a hospice, one of which was fighting the inevitable with her lone T-cell—her “one soldier.” I’ve watched innumerable women leave their rural homes to look for nonexistent work near the city, knowing that they will make easy prey for older men who will support them for sex. I’ve photographed a young HIV-positive woman who refuses to take medication out of fear it would indicate to others her impending death. Instead, she tells me about her dreams of joining the army to earn “money like dust” to support herself and her newborn child, joking in the same breath about how she probably won’t make it to twenty and see me on my next trip back. It is difficult to comprehend how she so easily accepts the contradictions in her life. That her own mother is too scared to tell her daughter or any of her friends that she herself has started anti-retroviral treatment—out of fear of gossip and isolation—seems to underscore the frustrating reality that for every step forward, there is a step back.

And that’s the thing: there isn’t a single story, just frustrating inconsistencies. Yet on each trip, I still find a sense of hope for what the future might hold, even as they navigate this narrow bridge between life and death.

Krisanne Johnson has been working on long-term personal projects about young women and HIV/AIDS in Swaziland and post-apartheid South African youth culture since 2006. Her work has appeared in various publications, including TIME, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, among others. I Love You Real Fast is on display through Nov. 26 at The Half King in New York City.