Tag Archives: Urban Spaces

Photo Show – City of Home by Alina Kisina on show at Light House Media Centre in Wolverhampton

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Last year I posted on Ukrainian photographer Alina Kisina‘s show City of Home and am delighted to report that her latest work from the series is on show at the Light House Media Centre, Wolverhampton until 25 January 2013.  The exhibition includes new work specially commissioned by Light House.

And if you’re still thinking about Christmas presents, there is a special edition of three of her latest works available, including the two images posted here, for sale during the holiday season. Only 50 of each print will be produced and each will be numbered, signed by the photographer, and have a certificate of authenticity. Each unframed A4 print costs £75 + £7.50 p&p. A set of all three images can be bought for £200 + £12.50 p&p and includes an archival box and a set of gloves.

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Professor Raoul Eschelman, author of Performatism, or the End of Postmodernism, writes about the work:
“Alina Kisina’s photographs of urban spaces in her native Kiev are not documentary pictures in the usual sense of the word. Rather, Kisina’s work mixes abstraction and representation to create evocative images that elude easy description or categorization. The most striking aspect of her art is its bold use of reflections. These juxtapose different levels of reality in a way that confounds our notions of up and down, in and out, fore and back. But her aim is not simply to confuse us. Rather, the overlapping planes of reality draw us dynamically into her photos to produce a sensation of depth suggesting another, more profound dimension beyond the mere givens of the picture.
“In many of the photographs in the Light House exhibit, this is done in a way that is best described as dramatic. Powerfully etched lines, curves, and forms draw us into a receding space marked by extreme glare or by patches of bright light that seem to dissolve material reality within them. The photos of this kind take the form of dramatic epiphanies—intuitive, overpowering insights into the nature of reality experienced through commonplace forms and scenes.”

There is also a great interview with Light House about her work. Finally, Coventry-born photographer, teacher and supporter of Kisina’s work, John Blakemore, spoke to her in a filmed interview that will be available shortly.

Filed under: Photo Talks, Podcasts, Women Photographers Tagged: Alina Kisina, City of Home, John Blakemore, Light House Media Centre, photo show, Professor Raoul Eschelman, Wolverhampton

Stephanie de Rouge

Some photographers are natural observers, and some take that curiosity to another level and want to open a few drawers and dig a little deeper.  French photographer, Stephanie de Rouge, is one of those visual investigators, probing into the pysche of how we humans function, especially in big city life.  Stephanie has traversed a number of approaches to looking at our lives–shooting New Yorkers in their bedrooms or on their rooftops, and with the work featured below, In Your Fridge, shooting what her subjects eat, or at least have in their refrigerators.

After 30 years in Paris, Stephanie now makes her home in New York, teaching at the International Center for Photography, works as a contributor for Le Journal de La Photographie and the New York Times, and is a freelance portrait photographer.  Her work has been featured in many publications and she has exhibited widely, with two recent exhibitions in Paris.


Through my travels, I have developed a fascination for big cities and their devastating energy.  Since I live and work in New York, I am more than ever wondering how humans survive those tentacular – always exciting – and often hostile urban spaces.  How they preserve their singularity and intimacy, where they find the soft, he poetic, the soothing, where they hide their secrets.

 Brookkyn, NY, Famille Englund

I started the project by shooting portraits of New Yorkers in their bedrooms (In Your Room) thinking it could be a good place for intimacy.  I was wrong. Or not exactly right.  The building walls don’t talk.  New Yorkers move all the time, share/sublet bedrooms…Not a good setting for a long term relationship with one self.

 Brooklyn, NY, Andrew et Framton

Quickly, my subjects whispered a few words about a place dear to their hearts: rooftops.  An outdoor space for intimacy? Why not…Let’s see…I discovered more than 40 of these urban shelters between earth and sky (On Your Roof), and as fascinated not by the amazing light, not by the phenomenal views, but by the real people I met up there and the very touching stories they shared with me.

 Brooklyn, NY, Fred

Then I got thirsty…Can I grab a juice in the fridge?

 New York, NY, John

Hmmm….what’s with the Barbie doll behind the salad? From Paris to New York, I opened more than 45 fridges and discovered quite amazing worlds.  Much more elaborate and revealing than I had expected in the first place.  But I knew I was at a milestone in my quest of intimacy on big cities when people actually started refusing to show their fridges.  As if something too personal was stacked between the cheddar cheese and the mayonnaise.  So…show me (what you eat) your refrigerator, I’ll tell you who you are? Maybe. Maybe no.

 New York, NY, colocataries

 New York, NY, Charmaine et Marc

 Paris, Aurore

 Paris, Famille Doucet

 Paris, Famille Reytier

 Paris, Famille Rouge

 Paris, Marie

 Paris, Monique

 Paris, Pierre

 Paris, Thierry

 Queens, NY, Famille Hamad

Rye, NY, Famille Fillion

Philip-Lorca diCorcia “reality,fiction and desire”

Philip-Lorca diCorcia (born 1951) is an American photographer. He studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Afterwards diCorcia attended Yale University where he received a Master of Fine Arts in Photography in 1979. Social Outbreak . He now lives and works in New York, and teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. DiCorcia alternates between informal snapshots and iconic quality staged compositions that often have a baroque theatricality. Using a carefully planned staging, he takes everyday occurrences beyond the realm of banality, trying to inspire in his picture’s spectators an awareness of the psychology and emotion contained in real-life situations. His work could be described as documentary photography mixed with the fictional world of cinema and advertising, which creates a powerful link between reality, fantasy and desire. colarado foundation repair . download firefox free . During the late 1970s, during diCorcia’s early career, he used to situate his friends and family within fictional interior tableaus, that would make the viewer think that the pictures were spontaneous shots of someone’s everyday life, when they were in fact carefully staged and planned in beforehand.He would later start photographing random people in urban spaces all around the world. When in Berlin, Calcutta, Hollywood, New York, Rome and Tokyo, he would often hide lights in the pavement, which would illuminate a random subject in a special way, often isolating them from the other people in the street His photographs would then give a