Tag Archives: University Of Georgia

Joshua Dudley Greer, Parkton

Joshua Dudley Greer, Parkton

Joshua Dudley Greer

Parkton,
Maryland, 2005
From the Somewhere Along the Line series
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer

Imperial Sand Dunes,
California, 2011
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer

Imperial Sand Dunes,
California, 2011
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Joshua Dudley Greer, Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A

Joshua Dudley Greer, Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A

Joshua Dudley Greer

Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A ,
Point Pleasant, West Virginia, 2011
From the Point Pleasant series
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer was born in Hazelton, Pennsylvania. He received his BFA in Photography from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. Joshua's work has been featured in publications such as Smithsonian Magazine, Photographer's Forum Magazine and Flash Forward 2010. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council and was a Critical Mass finalist in 2011. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Gift of Gift of: Laura Young

Sometime back, I featured a Call for Entry for the Gift of Gift of Program. Gift of Gift of’s mission is to offer young art patrons an egalitarian opportunity to impact large collecting institutions and to aid emerging artists at a critical point in their careers.

Each year Gift of Gift of organizes an event in which photographs are exhibited for the consideration of collective purchase, to be offered as a donation to a major collecting institution. Event attendees receive a set number of votes with the purchase of event tickets. Attendees then vote on which of the exhibited artworks they think should become part of a museum’s permanent collection. Those artworks with the highest number of votes will be purchased with the pooled funds.

GoGo’s events introduce young collectors to young artists; GoGo gives the gift of exposure to emerging artists; GoGo gives the gift of discovering works to young patrons; GoGo gives the gift of new artwork to chosen collecting institutions.

So long story short, I was curious to see who was selected and collected into the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. And as luck would have it, when I contacted one of the winners, Laura Young, about featuring her work on LENSCRATCH, she told me that she had read about the call, right here, on LENSCRATCH and this post has now come full circle.

Here is the photograph that is now held in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.
Titled: Furrow, created in 2010.

Laura Young lives in Nashville, holds a BFA from the University of Georgia and an MFA from the University of Miami. Laura’s artistic expression is not just confined to photography–she uses a variety of media including ceramics and works on paper, and a common theme in her work is the relationship we have with our bodies. She began using her own body as canvas in 2005 and Since then, ornamenting her body has become a ritual performed to alter her sense of self. She has had numerous exhibitions galleries and museums and was awarded a Professional Development Grant by the Tennessee Arts Commission in 2010.

“Furrow” is from a series about wanting to alter one’s body and the internal conflict that develops when we feel repulsed and attracted to our body at the same time.

The long history of body ornamentation is intricately connected to human identity. Whether with permanent marks like tattoos, or temporary decorations like makeup and clothing, body art is used to signal an individual’s place in society, to enhance beauty, and to symbolize group identity and affiliation. It can also be a way for people to challenge social values and cultural assumptions about identity, and the body itself.
















Drawing on my body is a ritual that helps me explore my identity. This ritual mimics the daily grooming and attention to appearance that is tightly woven into most woman’s identity. As such it binds me to the “Tribe of Women.” Yet, I strive to stretch the boundaries of my identity and construct a self image that plumbs the depths of my longing rather than conform to society’s ideals of feminine beauty and behavior.



















In my current studio practice, I start by drawing lines and patterns on my skin to alter my appearance and reveal hidden aspects of my identity. Then I document the transformation by shooting self portrait photographs with a digital camera in natural light.

















Over the past 5 years, this process has opened my eyes to how ingrained the cult of beauty is in all of us. With different series, I have captured my feminine and masculine aspects, my human and animal traits, and the feelings of attraction and repulsion to my own body. My most recent series has been an attempt to create portraits of strong women. Women whose life experience seems etched upon their skin and with this experience comes a wisdom which I’m longing to know.



































































The following images started in response to the way women apply cosmetics to change their appearance to fit our society’s ideas of beauty. I began to fantasize about what women might look like in a society where beauty was believed to be the visual expression of the person’s inner state and personal traits. How would personal qualities such as compassion, intuition, creativity, perseverance be expressed? The resulting portraits turned out to be interesting women that I would like to have coffee with.

Laura Noel



All images © Laura Noel

Another notable submission we’ve received recently is Laura Noel’s Fiction, an introspective meditation on postmodernism and the self. Noel is an American photographer based in Atlanta, Georgia, who originally pursued her BA in Public Policy Studies and later graduated from the University of Georgia with an MFA in Photography.

Noel has developed a unique way of working with her images, the reasons for which she expands upon in her statement about Fiction:

“My photographs are like the first sentence of a short story, only the ending can never be certain. I pair images together to enhance the narratives I sense and build up in my mind while working in the street surrounded by strangers I can never really know, but feel a connection to. I am fascinated by the strong emotions that emanate from people isolated on the streets and in social settings. Occasionally the presence of manmade objects is powerful enough that people become superfluous and do not appear in the image.

I fracture these incomplete stories into diptychs so the line where the two images meet becomes the seam between fact and fiction, reality and longing, the universal and the personal. The structure of the image supports the concept behind the picture. The major theme running through Fiction is the struggle to maintain individuality in an increasingly homogeneous society. This is something I feel acutely in my own life and see reflected in others.

Through photography my life becomes intertwined with the people and places I see. By focusing my camera on certain people,I am making them a part of my life. These people catch my attention, because their appearances and actions touch something in my past or confront some of my concerns. It seems natural that these images be diptychs joining my real life with the imagined lives of others.”

Noel has clearly been very active, and aside from working as an adjunct professor at Emory University, she has exhibited internationally including festivals, galleries and museums in China, the US and Germany.

Her photographs have also notably appeared in on-line and in print in Photography Now, Photography Quarterly, PHOTONEWS (Germany)and Lens Culture.

For more of Fiction, other projects and information on Noel visit www.lauranoel.com