Tag Archives: University Of Chicago

Dawoud Bey: Picturing People and Harlem, USA

Kenneth; from Class Pictures, 2007 (c) Dawoud Bey

Dawoud Bey, the photographer known for his large-scale portraits of adolescents published in the 2007 monograph Class Pictures, has two solo exhibitions currently on view in the Chicago area that span his nearly four-decade-long career.

First, the Art Institute of Chicago presents Harlem, USA (on view May 2 – September 9, 2012), featuring some of Bey’s earliest work candid;y documenting street life with a tremendous sense of empathy for a neighborhood to which he had great familial ties. The work, which the institute recently acquired for their permanent collection, is exhibited here for the first time since Bey’s first solo show at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1979. Bey, who teaches at Columbia College, explains in an interview with the Chicago Reader how he found inspiration for this series and for becoming an artist at the Metropolitan Museum’s 1969 exhibition Harlem On My Mind.

In addition, the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago presents Picturing People (on view May 13 – June 24, 2012) a career survey of his work “ranging from chance street encounters to studio portraits,” including a few pieces from his latest series Strangers/Community which features photographs of people from Hyde Park, Chicago, where he now calls home. On Saturday, May 26 Darby English, associate professor of Art History at the University of Chicago and author of How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness (MIT Press, 2007)hosts a free walkthrough of the exhibition.

Find a reviews of both of the exhibitions at the Chicago Reader: ”Two Exhibitions Trace the Journey of Dawoud Bey;” or at Chicago magazine: “A Window into Dawoud Bey’s Photography.

And watch a three-part video series on our Vimeo page in which Bey, in conversation with Carrie Mae Weems at Aperture Gallery (February of 2008 during his exhibition of Class Pictures), discusses his approach to portraiture through the Harlem series, how he collaborates with subjects to highlight gestures, and how his subjects end up reacting to the project.

Aperture magazine subscribers can also read philosopher and art critic Arthur C. Danto’s analysis of Harlem, USA in issue 189.

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Harlem, USA
Exhibition on view:
May 2 – September 9, 2012

The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
(312) 629-6100

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Picturing People
Exhibition on view:
May 13 – June 24, 2012

Gallery Walkthrough with Darby English
Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 12:00 pm
FREE

The Renaissance Society
5811 S. Ellis Avenue
Bergman Gallery, Cobb Hall 418
Chicago, Illinois
(773) 702-8670


Visit the University of Chicago’s Renaissance Society for a Sneak Peak at Survival Techniques Artist, Yto Barrada

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Hailing from Tangier, Yto Barrada’s work about contemporary social and political issues in Morocco is getting a lot of attention here in Chicago.

Barrada, whose work will be featured in the MoCP’s upcoming exhibition Survival Techniques, also has an exhibition currently running at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Barrada’s show, Riffs, at the Renaissance Society explores the seemingly mundane aspects of the historical changes currently taking place in North Africa. Similarly, her work in Survival Techniques discusses these same political issues… but in a more satirical fashion. Using photographs, illustrations, diagrams, slogans, stories and games to comment on social and political issues in contemporary Morocco, Barrada pokes fun at the struggles the country faces in the eyes of globalization.

Riffs is on display at the Renaissance Society through April 22. Survival Techniques runs at the Museum of Contemporary Photography April 12 through July 1. Admission to both museums is free and open to the public.

About Yto Barrada
Born in France, Barrada grew up between Tangier and Paris, where she studied history and political science at the Sorbonne. After attending the International Center for Photography in New York and spending 16 years abroad, Barrada returned to Tangiers, where she continues to base her artwork on the cultural climate of the city. Recently, she had a solo exhibition at the Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, and also exhibited at the 2011 Venice Biennale.

Visit the University of Chicago’s Renaissance Society for a Sneak Peak at Survival Techniques Artist, Yto Barrada

3.20.12_Barrada_blog.jpg

Hailing from Tangier, Yto Barrada’s work about contemporary social and political issues in Morocco is getting a lot of attention here in Chicago.

Barrada, whose work will be featured in the MoCP’s upcoming exhibition Survival Techniques, also has an exhibition currently running at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Barrada’s show, Riffs, at the Renaissance Society explores the seemingly mundane aspects of the historical changes currently taking place in North Africa. Similarly, her work in Survival Techniques discusses these same political issues… but in a more satirical fashion. Using photographs, illustrations, diagrams, slogans, stories and games to comment on social and political issues in contemporary Morocco, Barrada pokes fun at the struggles the country faces in the eyes of globalization.

Riffs is on display at the Renaissance Society through April 22. Survival Techniques runs at the Museum of Contemporary Photography April 12 through July 1. Admission to both museums is free and open to the public.

About Yto Barrada
Born in France, Barrada grew up between Tangier and Paris, where she studied history and political science at the Sorbonne. After attending the International Center for Photography in New York and spending 16 years abroad, Barrada returned to Tangiers, where she continues to base her artwork on the cultural climate of the city. Recently, she had a solo exhibition at the Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, and also exhibited at the 2011 Venice Biennale.

Venue Change for Tomorrow’s W.J.T. Mitchell Lecture

3.19.12_WJT%20Mitchell_blog.jpgThose of you coming to tomorrows W.J.T. Mitchell lecture will have to walk a little father to get here… about 20 steps farther.The lecture by distinguished University of Chicago Iconology scholar will be moved down the hall of 600 S. Michigan Ave., from the Ferguson Lecture Hall to the Museum of Contemporary Photographys main gallery. set up basic cable service . The lecture, which begins at 6:30 p.m., discusses the capability of digital photography to expand the potential scope of photographic truth-claims along with the potential for lying. Admission is free and open to the public. proveedor factura electrnica . For more information, visit the Events page on our website. About W.J.T. MitchellW.J.T. Mitchell is a scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). A Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago, Mitchell is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, and the author of numerous publications including What Do Pictures Want? The Lives and Loves of Images (2005).

Venue Change for Tomorrow’s W.J.T. Mitchell Lecture

3.19.12_WJT%20Mitchell_blog.jpgThose of you coming to tomorrows W.J.T. Mitchell lecture will have to walk a little father to get here… about 20 steps farther.The lecture by distinguished University of Chicago Iconology scholar will be moved down the hall of 600 S. Michigan Ave., from the Ferguson Lecture Hall to the Museum of Contemporary Photographys main gallery. The lecture, which begins at 6:30 p.m., discusses the capability of digital photography to expand the potential scope of photographic truth-claims along with the potential for lying. Admission is free and open to the public. For more information, visit the Events page on our website. About W.J.T. MitchellW.J.T. Mitchell is a scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). carrera de fotografia . squido lense . A Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago, Mitchell is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, and the author of numerous publications including What Do Pictures Want? The Lives and Loves of Images (2005).

Alan Thomas, Sleeping on the Maidan

Alan Thomas, Sleeping on the Maidan

Alan Thomas

Sleeping on the Maidan,
Kolkata, India, 2011
From the Virtue bears flowers that never decay series
Website – Alan-Thomas.com

Alan Thomas was raised in Germany, Yugoslavia, and Virginia. He studied photography at Princeton and holds an M.Phil. in English from Oxford. Thomas’s photographs have been exhibited at the Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago and other venues. His photographic series Open Secrets: Photographs of Japan, Chicago Self-Park, Calcutta Bookland, and The Blue Corvette have been published with his accompanying essays by Places: Design for the Public Realm and Design Observer. He lives in Chicago, where he is editorial director for the humanities and social sciences at the University of Chicago Press.

Our Origins Opening Reception Draws a Crowd

We’d like to thank everyone who came out to the opening reception for Our Origins last Thursday!

The event, which included a guided gallery tour from contributing artists Alison Ruttan, Ken Fandell, Alison Carey and Jennifer Ray, had an exceptional turnout, allowing artists, curators, college students and the general public to meet and discuss artistic representations to the age-old question, “Where do we, as humans, come from?”

In case you missed it, here are some photos from the event:

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Jennifer Ray discusses the inspiration behind her series, Go Deep into the Woods.

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Alison Carey discusses her series, Organic Remains of a Former World with visitors.

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After giving a lecture on his video installation, The Most Important Picture Ever, Ken Fandell mingles during the reception.

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Jennifer Ray fields questions on her work during the opening reception.

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The crowd snacks and socializes, no doubt making plans to meet up at the next MoCP event.

Miss this event? Visit us for one of these upcoming events at the museum:
• Thursday, September 27 at 5 p.m. when Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell visit the museum to sign their books, Animals are Outside Today and Double Life.
• Tuesday, October 2 when Our Origins artist Aspen Mays joins Kathryn Schaffer, postdoctoral fellow at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, to talk about ways scientists and photographers can team up to help answer questions about the origins of the universe.