Tag Archives: Typologies

The Bechers on Display at Paris Photo

The work of the photographic duo Bernd and Hilla Becher is indisputably some of the most important in modern photography. This week, a two-part exhibit at Paris Photo highlights the historical significance of the Bechers, most well known for their “typologies”—uniform, photographic studies of industrial structures such as water towers and blast furnaces.

The first part of the show, Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012, features an extensive collection of rare ephemera related to the Bechers’ work. These objects, including posters, invitations and museum catalogues, were amassed by curator and book dealer Antoine de Beaupré for more than ten years.

“You get an historical overview,” said Beaupré. “and also an evolution of how their work developed over the years, especially in the beginning.”

One highlight of the collection is the magazine Anonyme Skulpturen which was printed in 1969 to accompany an exhibition of the Bechers’ work in Düsseldorf. This work would become a monograph of the same name, published in 1970, which is also featured in the Paris show.

The printed objects collected by Beupré represent the Bechers’ work from 1964 to 1977, while a presentation of their monographs, mounted under plexiglass and affixed to the gallery walls, span from 1970 to the present day.

The second section of the Paris show features a selection of 117 photographs chosen by Hilla Becher (Bernd Becher passed away in 2007) from the 1977 book Zeche Zollern II – Photographs of Bernd & Hilla Becher. Together, these prints, objects and publications are a comprehensive tribute to the Bechers’ long and prolific photographic career.


Antoine de Beaupré is a curator and the founder of the Librairie 213 in Paris.

Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012 is on display at Paris Photo from Nov. 15 to 18.

Robert Schlaug

Robert Schlaug lives and works near Nueremberg, Germany.  He has a simple intention with his photography: to raise awareness in times of sensory overload.  Not an easy task, but he uses the idea of how humans intersect architecture, especially architecture that is placed without concern to aesthetic or environment. He considers space and place and how human navigate through it. 


His website reflects his ability to look at the world, and see phenomenon through typologies and simply by taking the time to recognize our changing landscape.  This grid taken from his website reflects some of his explorations:

An example of one of his typologies:
Today I am featuring Robert’s series, Gigantomania and Oversizing: The Wonderland of Kitsch.
Gigantomania and Oversizing: The Wonderland of Kitsch
On Lara Beach just a few kilometers from Antalya away in Turkey, there are sixteen so-called theme hotels, and it leaves on speechless.  It is believed to be in Las Vegas.  Hotel disguised as the ultratsonic aircraft, Concorde, as an imitation of the Titanic, as the Moscow Kemlin, or as Topkapi Palace, without reference to the environment and the local building tradition,in rank and file on this beautiful stretch of beach on the Turkish Riviera.

In the middle of them another hotel giant, which has been completed.  Its spire looks like an imitation of the Chrysler Building top in New York,  Nut for this hotel, one tower is not enough.  It must have four identical towers next to one another.

On the whole beach, nothing to see from the charming Turkish Villages, and the Turkish way of life, only the commercial triumph here..  Shopping malls replace traditional bazaars.


Behind the hotel, just across the street, there are twenty uniform blocks of flats, 18 of them are vacant.  Signs of gigantic bad planning.  Due to the lack of Infrastructure, the homes are standing empty since a few years marked by decay.  Sad scenery in an oversized, artificial world.  An autonomous island of commercialization on the coast of Turkey.

Joshua Ballew

When I first saw Joshua Ballew’s work, I knew we had something in common. For years, I would collect shopping lists I’d find in grocery carts and keep them to reread the scrawled rosters of much needed items.  They were poignant and insightful and ultimately odd and ordinary.  The handwriting, the miss spellings, and that one quirky item that gives you a window into the person adds to the experience.

Joshua also collects grocery lists for his project, Archive of the Ordinary.

Image from Archives of the Ordinary

The series featured today is a wonderful exploration of items he has come across in various books.  Between the Sheets are little messages or totems that connect us to another human and offer a sense of history and what has come before.  

Joshua is working towards his BFA in Photography at The Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design (MIAD) and living in his hometown of Milwaukee, WI.   His work questions “What do the
objects we use reflect about our character”? By utilizing mundane, yet
personal items he investigates what can be revealed by creating typologies of similar objects. The collected work exposes something about the person the items are connected to, but also reflect items that are banal and wonderfully unique at the same time. 
Between The
Sheets
– This series
examines the peculiar relationship between used “romance” novels and the small
items I find within each book. I am motivated by the simple question,
“What do the objects we use reveal about our character?” My process of searching
through the shelves of bookstores and thrift shops is deliberate, while the
discovery and variety of items left behind is unexpected. 

Each diptych exists as a faceless portrait of the previous owner offering more questions than definitive answers. Pairing the items with an image of the pages on which they were found, allows for the banality of each item to contrast the sensational lines of text and titles of each book. This disparity between the real and the ideal becomes the focus of the work, speaking directly to the desire of escapism fulfilled within the pages of each book. 

Taking It to the Streets

The Occupy Wall Street movement has, at times, been chaotic. During an Oct. 1 march across the Brooklyn Bridge, more than 700 people were arrested. On Oct. 15, when protesters took over Times Square, two policeman were injured as the NYPD had to use horses to bash barricades back into place when protesters tried to push through them. I was ever so skeptical when I first met photographer Sasha Bezzubov. I had seen his extraordinary work, so I didn’t doubt his ability for a second, but I knew how chaotic the protests could become.

In my short career as a working journalist, I’ve had the pleasure of working mostly with combat photographers like Kadir van Lohuizen and Erin Trieb. Combat photographers move quickly—shooting, ducking, shifting and shooting again. Somehow they make sense of chaos, and great beauty develops out of their constant motion.

Sasha shoots on film from a tripod, and I knew that he would take great photos, but I knew it would involve some crowd control. Sasha, known for his portrait typologies of travelers and adventurers, shot some extraordinary portraits in his two days at Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street’s base camp. His subjects were a perfect anthropological study of the people who populate the movement: the old and the young, the employed and the searching, the curious and the erudite. As the sun began to set on the first day, Sasha ran out from the crowd and said he had seen a woman holding a bird. He asked me to see if we could take her portrait. She had the most piercing eyes, and I knew Sasha would take an excellent photograph. It turns out that the woman was the one seen on YouTube by more than a million people falling screaming to her knees, after a police commander sprayed pepper in her face. We had been writing about her for a week and only then found out who she was.

Sasha Bezzubov for TIME

Kaylee Dedrick, activist. October 7, 2011

That was one of the treasures to come out of working with Sasha. The rest are shown here. And for the record, the bird survived and, a few days later, flew away.

Sasha Bezzubov is a Brooklyn based photographer. Facts on the Ground, an exhibition by Bezzubov and his collaborator Jessica Sucher is on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York through October 22. More of his work can be seen here.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings. Continue the discussion on TIME‘s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

Taking It to the Streets

The Occupy Wall Street movement has, at times, been chaotic. During an Oct. 1 march across the Brooklyn Bridge, more than 700 people were arrested. On Oct. 15, when protesters took over Times Square, two policeman were injured as the NYPD had to use horses to bash barricades back into place when protesters tried to push through them. I was ever so skeptical when I first met photographer Sasha Bezzubov. I had seen his extraordinary work, so I didn’t doubt his ability for a second, but I knew how chaotic the protests could become.

In my short career as a working journalist, I’ve had the pleasure of working mostly with combat photographers like Kadir van Lohuizen and Erin Trieb. Combat photographers move quickly—shooting, ducking, shifting and shooting again. Somehow they make sense of chaos, and great beauty develops out of their constant motion.

Sasha shoots on film from a tripod, and I knew that he would take great photos, but I knew it would involve some crowd control. Sasha, known for his portrait typologies of travelers and adventurers, shot some extraordinary portraits in his two days at Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street’s base camp. His subjects were a perfect anthropological study of the people who populate the movement: the old and the young, the employed and the searching, the curious and the erudite. As the sun began to set on the first day, Sasha ran out from the crowd and said he had seen a woman holding a bird. He asked me to see if we could take her portrait. She had the most piercing eyes, and I knew Sasha would take an excellent photograph. It turns out that the woman was the one seen on YouTube by more than a million people falling screaming to her knees, after a police commander sprayed pepper in her face. We had been writing about her for a week and only then found out who she was.

Sasha Bezzubov for TIME

Kaylee Dedrick, activist. October 7, 2011

That was one of the treasures to come out of working with Sasha. The rest are shown here. And for the record, the bird survived and, a few days later, flew away.

Sasha Bezzubov is a Brooklyn based photographer. Facts on the Ground, an exhibition by Bezzubov and his collaborator Jessica Sucher is on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York through October 22. More of his work can be seen here.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings. Continue the discussion on TIME‘s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

Serpentine Pavilion – Rem Koolhaas

www.channelbeta.net //////// Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2006, by Rem Koolhaas and Cecil Balmond, with Arup 13 July 15 October 2006 The Serpentine Pavilion 2006 was co-designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Rem Koolhaas and innovative structural designer Cecil Balmond. caterer . The centrepiece of the design was a spectacular ovoid-shaped inflatable canopy that floated above the Gallerys lawn. recycled drinking glasses . Made from translucent material, the canopy was raised into the air or lowered to cover the amphitheatre below according to the weather. A frieze designed by Thomas Demand marked the first collaboration between an artist and the designers of the Pavilion. The walled enclosure below the canopy functioned both as a caf and forum for televised and recorded public programmes including live talks and film screenings in the Time Out Park Nights at the Serpentine Gallery programme. The Pavilion also housed works by several artists participating in the Uncertain States of America exhibition. Rem Koolhaas said: The 2006 Serpentine Pavilion is defined by events and activities. We are proposing a space that facilitates the inclusion of individuals in communal dialogue and shared experience. flowers . Cecil Balmond said: These Pavilions have evolved with various structural typologies and materials, provoking a debate on architecture; this year the exploration continues not only with typology and material but with the very definition of Pavilion. Each Summer, the Serpentine commissions an internationally