Tag Archives: Travel Photography

Defining identity & memory with "deep fried" photo portraits, and more


Deep Fried. 1997, C-print, 50.8cm x 61cm. carrera de fotografia . Chino Otsuka. Image courtesy of Huis Marseille.

At age 10, Japanese-born Chino Otsuka was sent away to a progressive private boarding school in Suffolk, England. For her first two years at the school, she was allowed to do nothing. Directory Submission . Then, following her own interests, she started to pursue education with an unrelenting intensity. A book she wrote, at age 15, about her culture-shock and quest for personal identity, made her an instant hero and celebrity back home in Japan. (Twenty years later, the book is still a “must read” for many young Japanese students.) She went on to pursue photography at the Royal Academy of Art, and began a life-long career exploring ideas of identity, memory, and mental time travel, through photography and video and writing.

A brilliant retrospective of her work fills the entire photography museum at Huis Marseille in Amsterdam. And an equally inspiring photobook has just been published: Photo Album by Chino Otsuka.

See and read more in Lens Culture.

Photographer #420: Joël Tettamanti

Joël Tettamanti, 1977, Switzerland, is a photographer who travels to remote places around the world for his photographic art. His work is a mixture of documentary, architectural, landscape and travel photography. He has traveled to places as Togo, Kuweit, Japan, Azerbaijan, India and Greenland. His photographs are a reflection of a traveling observer who sees ordinary objects, landscapes and buildings that others would pass without noticing. In his images the ordinary becomes the extraordinary and tell the story of man and its environment. In 2006 Joël released the book Local Studies in which his work from various series is combined with texts of 6 different authors. He studied graphic design and photography at the Ecole Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne. Since 2009 he is also a photography teacher at ECAL. His work has been exhibited extensively, mainly in Switzerland and France. The following images come from the series Ayome, Qaqortoq and Harajuku.

Website: www.tettamanti.chwww.tettamanti.li

G. M. B. Akash

Today, I count myself blessed, having become a photographer. To be able to articulate the experiences of the voiceless, to bring their identity to the forefront, gives meaning and purpose to my own life, aptly stated by GMB Akash, a photographer who uses his passion to change the lives of those who can’t tell their own stories. He has received more than 40 international awards from all around the world and his work has been featured in over 50 major international publications including: National Geographic, Vogue, Time, Sunday Times, Newsweek, Geo, Stern,Der Spiegel, The Fader,Brand Ein, The Guardian, Marie Claire, Colors, The Economist, The New Internationalist, Kontinente, Amnesty Journal, Courier International, PDN, Die Zeit, Days Japan, Hello, and Sunday Telegraph of London. In 2009, GMB won the international ‘Travel photographer of the year ‘title from the international travel photographer of the year competition ( TPOY 2009 ), the most prestigious award in travel photography, UK.

I wrote about Mr. Akash on Lenscratch two years ago, sharing his riveting work from Nothing to Hold Onto, about train travel in Bangladesh and Life at the Dump Yard, about trash pickers. You can read more about GMB in this Tiffin Box interview.

GMB recently wrote me about his opportunity to lecture at TEDxO’Porto 2011 in Portugal, featured in the You Tube below. This also sent me back to his website and I am featuring work from his heartbreaking series, Born to Work, about child labor in Bangladesh. I had a hard time editing this project, so I am sharing more images than usual.


Born to work: Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation.

17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age group are engaged in economic activities. many of this children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.

Photographer #276: Damon Winter

Damon Winter, 1974, USA, is a photographer who is highly competent in various kinds of photography. He is based in New York City and works as a staff photographer for The New York Times. He focuses on photojournalism, documentary work, celebrity portraiture and travel photography. For his work he has traveled extensively to places as Iceland, Japan and Afghanistan. His photo essay on sexual abuse victims in Alaska in 2005 was nominated for a Pullitzer Prize, but it wasn’t until 2009 that he won the Pullitzer Prize for feature photography with his images that captured the different facets of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. The following images come from his portfolio Faces and from the stories Afghanistan and Haiti Earthquake.

Website: www.damonwinter.com