Tag Archives: Tisch School Of The Arts

Review Santa Fe: Jay Muhlin

Review Santa Fe participant Jay Muhlin is a Philadelphia photographer with a focus on artist books. His work explores themes of loss, intimacy, comfort, anxiety, and masculinity. What
results are multivalent narratives, visual threads that not only “define his subjects with empathy,
but also seek emotional truth.”

Jay received a BFA in Photography from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts  and recently completed his MFA in Transmedia/Art Photography at Syracuse University. His work has appeared in various editorial publications worldwide and he has recently completed residencies at the
Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester NY, The Millay Colony for the Arts in
Austerlitz, NY and at Contemporary Artists Center at Woodside in Troy NY.
Jay teaches courses at Syracuse University, Salem Community College and
was a visiting faculty member at Bennington College in 2011.

 His current project, a book titled Guilty Pleasures, looks at finding comfort during winter. The images speak through visual pun and metaphor. Muhlin often takes diaristic liberties and embraces serendipity, building images that refer to something other than what is named or described in the frame: something intangible such as longing, intimacy, and solitude. Strung together are lists of simple comforts and tactile groupings which all contrast with the harshness that winter serves. 

Relief is offered through humor as it transforms coping into a joy that makes moving forward more meaningful. When this work is exhibited Muhlin uses an installation format, creating a quasidomestic space. Images are hung salon style in gaudy white frames with numerous different dimensions. The artist’s couch is available for sitting and viewing his book dummy, draped with a quilt embroidered with a wintery image from the project. Greeting cards, newspapers, and balloons- all ephemera to be given away, distributed, disturbed, or forgotten.

Review Santa Fe: Jay Muhlin

Review Santa Fe participant Jay Muhlin is a Philadelphia photographer with a focus on artist books. His work explores themes of loss, intimacy, comfort, anxiety, and masculinity. What
results are multivalent narratives, visual threads that not only “define his subjects with empathy,
but also seek emotional truth.”

Jay received a BFA in Photography from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts  and recently completed his MFA in Transmedia/Art Photography at Syracuse University. His work has appeared in various editorial publications worldwide and he has recently completed residencies at the
Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester NY, The Millay Colony for the Arts in
Austerlitz, NY and at Contemporary Artists Center at Woodside in Troy NY.
Jay teaches courses at Syracuse University, Salem Community College and
was a visiting faculty member at Bennington College in 2011.

 His current project, a book titled Guilty Pleasures, looks at finding comfort during winter. The images speak through visual pun and metaphor. Muhlin often takes diaristic liberties and embraces serendipity, building images that refer to something other than what is named or described in the frame: something intangible such as longing, intimacy, and solitude. Strung together are lists of simple comforts and tactile groupings which all contrast with the harshness that winter serves. 

Relief is offered through humor as it transforms coping into a joy that makes moving forward more meaningful. When this work is exhibited Muhlin uses an installation format, creating a quasidomestic space. Images are hung salon style in gaudy white frames with numerous different dimensions. The artist’s couch is available for sitting and viewing his book dummy, draped with a quilt embroidered with a wintery image from the project. Greeting cards, newspapers, and balloons- all ephemera to be given away, distributed, disturbed, or forgotten.

Robert Herman: The New Yorkers

Brooklyn born photographer, Robert Herman began working as an usher at a movie theater owned
by his parents. The exposure to a wide range of films during his formative
years provided him with a unique vision: “Working for my father allowed me to
view the same movie repeatedly,” he recalls, “until the story line began to
recede and the images became independent of the narrative.” 



Robert received a BFA in film making from the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and received his Masters in Digital Photography from the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  Later as a production still photographer on
independent feature films, Herman discovered the life at the periphery of film
locations was more compelling than the film sets. His book of his NYC color street photographs, The New Yorkers, to be self-published in the fall of 2013 with help from a successful Kickstarter campaign. His is currently also working with Fractured Atlas to defray additional costs and accepting additional tax deductible donations.
His work is part of the permanent collections of the George
Eastman House and the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA. His photographs are also
in many private collections and has exhibited across the United States including
the Museum of Modern Art, the galleries of the Savannah College of Art &
Design, The Los Angeles Center for Digital Art and The Henry Gregg Gallery in
DUMBO. This spring, photographs from The
New Yorkers
were included in a traveling exhibition that originated at the
Istanbul Photography Museum, and then moved to Ankara, Turkey with more venues
to be announced in the coming months.

The New Yorkers

New
York City is like a diamond mine. The pressure will turn one into coal dust or
a multi-faceted jewel. To survive with some sort of evolving grace, it is
absolutely essential to cultivate a Zen-like awareness. Consciously choosing to
be in a state of openness is also useful for making photographs. To paraphrase
the art critic John Berger: A photograph that surprises the photographer when
he makes it, in turn surprises the viewer. No matter how hardened and cynical
one becomes, the act of taking a picture, forces one to try to return to an
innocent wonder. Every time I go out to make photographs, I ask myself this
question: Can I see the world with vulnerability and clarity?

The
New Yorkers is a body of work that I began when I was still a student at NYU,
when I was learning to be a photographer. I was living in Little Italy at the
time and everyone around me seemed to be a subject: the man who changed tires,
the superintendent of the building next door.  I discovered Harry Callahan’s magnificent book: Color and
Robert Frank’s The Americans. These images opened my mind to what a strong
photograph could be. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then this
was my starting point. Both of these photographers re-made the mundane, the
ordinary and the everyday and transformed them into small and transcendent
jewels.

Over
the years, I lived in several different apartments and I continued making pictures
in whatever neighborhood I happened to be living in. Becoming comfortable in my
new surroundings would ease the way for me to make the authentic photographs I
was seeking. Key to this body of work was letting the subject matter determine
the outcome. I would make myself available, allowing my intuition to be my guide
and let the content rise to the surface. The true epiphany was not to embellish
or to judge: with the removal of the internal impediment strong subject matter
would speak for itself. Like a man searching for water in the desert with a
dousing rod, I became a vessel and allowed the images to pass through me onto
the film.

As an illustration of this, “Eldorado” was made
on a day when I was sitting around my loft with my girl friend at the time when
suddenly I said, “ I’ll be right back, I have to go out and take some
pictures.” Ann nodded her ascent and with my Nikon F in hand, I walked around
the corner onto Mulberry Street. 
In the bright afternoon sun two luxury cars were parked angling in from
the street towards a large green garage door. I chose my framing just as two
boys walked into the shot and I made my picture.  I was back at home five minutes later and knew I had captured
something truly special. I was at a loss to explain what had just happened. It
was truly a mystery. I realized that if I were wiling to relinquish some
control, I would occasionally be rewarded with strong photographs.
I went out to search for water
in order to survive, and I was led to something shining down from the sky
and bubbling
up from the ground.

There
is synchronicity and coincidence present everywhere. Photographs are a way of
revealing hidden relationships that are only present for a moment in space and
time, seen from a unique vantage point. The New Yorkers is the record of my
self-discovery as a photographer, inside and out, manifested on the streets of
New York City.

Sara Macel, Plane Over Baton Rouge

Sara Macel, Plane Over Baton Rouge

Sara Macel

Plane Over Baton Rouge,
Baton Rogue, Louisiana, 2011
From the May the Road Rise to Meet You series
Website – SaraMacel.com

Sara Macel received her B.F.A. in Photography and Imaging from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in 2003, and her MFA. in Photography, Video, & Related Media from the School of Visual Arts in 2011. Her work has been widely exhibited, including at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York; Center for Photography at Woodstock, New York; Jen Bekman Gallery, New York; and Kris Graves Projects, New York. She has received numerous awards, including winner in the 2011 Magenta Foundation Flash Forward competition, Top 50 Photographer in Photolucida’s Critical Mass Award, finalist in FotoVisura Spotlight Awards, best in show at Photobook 2012! at Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, NY and was recently named a winner in the New York Photo Festival Invitational for her self-published monograph May the Road Rise to Meet You. The book will also be on display in fall 2012 exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art and Gallery Carte Blanche in San Francisco. Her work is in various private collections, including the Harry Ransom Center and the Center of Photography at Woodstock. Sara currently teaches photography at Rockland Community College.

Emily Shur, Untitled #19

Emily Shur, Untitled #19

Emily Shur

Untitled #19,
, 2012
From the Nature Calls series
Website – EmilyShur.com

Emily Shur was born in New York City, at New York Hospital, to an auditorium full of nursing students. She attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University with a major in Photography and graduated in 1998 with academic honors along with the Artist Award for Creative Excellence. Emily’s work has been featured on numerous websites including Tiny Vices and 20×200 and has been exhibited in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. In 2008, she was honored to have an image in the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London. In 2009 and 2010, Emily was one of 100 photographers invited to participate in Review Santa Fe, and in 2010 her work was also included in Humble Art’s 31 Women in Art Photography exhibition. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and their dog, The Baroness, in a 106 year-old house in Echo Park.

Matthew Baum, Untitled

Matthew Baum, Untitled

Matthew Baum

Untitled,
New York, 2011
From the Eighteen series
Website – MatthewBaum.com

Matthew Baum is an artist and teacher based in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from Brown University in 1995 with a degree in American History and later studied architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Matthew earned an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2007. As a graduate student, he was a co-founder and director of the VisuaLife photo education program, working with underprivileged high school students in New York City. He currently teaches photography at the School of Visual Arts and New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

Openings Tonight!

picture-9

Delphine Diallo, Monica, courtesy the artist

Exhibitions opening in Chelsea, NYC tonight!

The Black Portrait: An exhibition curated by Natasha L. Logan and Hank Willis Thomas

The word black has several meanings in our society. It may reference individuals or groups with dark skin; a complete absence of light; the opposite of white; or the embodiment of a negative or pessimistic disposition. A portrait is understood to represent a person or thing, usually in the …form of a drawing, painting, photograph, engraving, or text. 

When these terms are linked, a sense of alchemical potency is suggested. This exhibition brings together paintings, photographs, videos, collage and sculpture by ten artists contending with what it means to make a black portrait. It aims to use this linkage to expand dialogue about identity, difference, and belonging in contemporary culture.

The exhibition will feature artists Christine Wong Yap, 
Coby Kennedy,
 Aperture Portfolio Prize Runner Up Delphine Diallo, Duron Jackson,
 Felandus Thames, 
Kajahl Benes,
 Kambui Olujimi,
 Keisha Scarville, 
Shane Aslan Selzer, and
 Toyin Odutola.

Hank Willis Thomas among others will participate in the two day-conference Beauty and Fashion: The Black Portrait Symposium at the department of Photography & Imaging Tisch School of the Arts at NYU on April 2-3.

Buy a signed copy of Hank Willis Thomas’ Aperture book Pitch Blackness here!

Opening Reception:
March 31, 6:00-8:00 pm

Exhibition on view:
March 31 – May 21, 2011

Rush Arts Gallery
526 W 26th Street, Suite 311
New York, New York

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Image courtesy Ruben Natal San-Miguel

First Class/Second Class:  An exhibition curated by Asya Geisberg and Leah Oates

This exhibition features work that investigates various aspects of class structure via either a personal narrative or an outsider’s perspective. The artists come from a range of backgrounds and cultures, and do not necessarily foreground the theme of class in their work. They include Chris Verene, Rebecca Morgan, Miles Ladin, Devin Troy Strother, Ruben Natal San-Miguel, Holly Jarrett, Conor McGrady, and Brian Shumway. This exhibition extracts class as a necessary and frequently overlooked prism through which we can interpret their work. First Class/Second Class posits that class is omnipresent as an identity marker, and frequently undermines race, gender, and nationality, while simultaneously being dependent on individual circumstances.

Opening Reception:
March 31, 6:00-8:00 pm

Exhibition on View:
March 31 – May 7, 2011

Asya Geisberg Gallery
537B West 23rd Street
New York,

Watch Chris Verene here on a panel at The New School titled: Contemporary Documentary Practices.


MOPLA: Marjorie Salvaterra

Looking at photographers and exhibitions featured in The Month of Photography in Los Angeles.

The first time I met Los Angeles photographer,Marjorie Salvaterra, I wasn’t prepared for the power of her work. She is fine boned and petite, with a grin and a pixie cut. I never imagined that the striking black and white imagery she started while on bed rest with her first child would evolve into her first solo exhibition at the Clark | Oshin Gallery in conjuction with the opening night of The Month of Photography in Los Angeles. The reception will take place at Pier 59 Studios West located next to the Santa Monica gallery complex, Bergamot Station, from 7-10pm.

The exhibition will also run June 1 – July 7, at Clark | Oshin Gallery at The Icon, 5450 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles.

Marjorie was born in St. Louis, Missouri and graduated from the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU. Her interest in all things theatrical began a transformation from acting to photography after playing the leading role in “The Faculty Lounge,” a black and white film by the late photographer, Herb Ritts. Her early interest photography was rekindled and never looked back.
Marjorie’s work has been well exhibited including Rencontres d’Arles, Arles, France; “Classic Camera Show,” Rayko Photo Center, San Francisco; MOPLA Group Show, Los Angeles; “Contrast LA,” at A&I Gallery, Los Angeles; “Alternative Photography,” at Julia Dean Gallery, Venice, California; and the “Human + Being” show at The Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Marjorie’s images reveal “a fine line between sanity and insanity,” according to Virginia Heckart, Associate Curator of Photography at The Getty Center. I’ve always been fascinated by human psychology. When most girls were reading Judy Blume, I was reading the DSM. It lists all the psychological disorders and their symptoms. Diagnosis is made on the number of symptoms. And yet, it is easy to go through the list of symptoms for the various disorders and think, ‘that could be me.’ Are we all a little crazy — at least at certain moments in our lives? Is it nurture vs. nature? Some believe people are either born sane or insane.

Others believe we are all born perfect and it’s the things that happen in our lives that damage us. I tend to believe the latter. In each portrait, I am looking for that line in each person: the part of ourselves that we tend to hide, the part that scares us, the part that is usually saved for the people closest to us – the ones that know our secrets.