Tag Archives: Time

Behind the Cover: Diana Walker on Photographing Hillary Clinton

Diana Walker spent seven days in just as many countries with Hillary Clinton for this week’s cover story (available to subscribers here). But the cover image itself was taken in about five minutes, with just the light from a window, at Clinton’s desk at the State Department in Washington yesterday morning.

Photograph by Diana Walker for TIME

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, October 26, 2011.

“She was at work at her desk, and I said, ‘Madame Secretary, look this way,’” says Walker, who has been photographing Clinton since January 1993. “She looked up at me, and then I said, ‘And now out the window.’ And bingo, that was the picture.”

Walker, who worked as TIME’s White House photographer for 20 years under Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton, says she prepared for her whirlwind week abroad with the Secretary of State in the same manner she did with former commanders in chief. “It’s not dissimilar,” she says. “You ride in the vans, jump out and run as fast you can to photograph her arriving. Then you line up and you’re herded into a room where the Secretary is meeting with whomever, and you make your pictures and then turn around and run out. And then you go to the next spot.”

In addition to standard press access during the trip, which began in Malta on Oct. 17 and ended in Uzbekistan on Oct. 23, Walker was also given time behind the scenes with Clinton, who she says doesn’t get enough credit for her “terrific” sense of humor—a characteristic she discovered while photographing the then-First Lady for TIME in 1997.

“I got in her limousine, and she was talking to her then chief of staff, laughing and having the best time,” Walker recalls. “That’s the image (below) we led with that year, in part, I think, because the editors were so impressed that it was another Hillary that they hadn’t seen. In public, she was much more straight-laced. In private, she could really kick back. I’m always eager to show that.”

Diana Walker

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton laughing it up with her chief of staff Melanne Verveer as they were returning to White House after delivering a speech at the University of Maryland in 1997.

That convivial atmosphere was around on this recent trip too, where Clinton often jokingly teased Walker for not keeping up. “Here I am lumbering along to catch up, while she has so much energy,” Walker says. “She wears me out! But it’s the most wonderful wearing out. She’s totally focused. But even with that laser focus, she has time to be funny and charming.”

Diana Walker was TIME’s White House photographer for 20 years, where she captured intimate moments with five presidents. You can see more work in her book The Bigger Picture: Thirty Years of Portraits and in our coverage of Steve Jobs

Feifei Sun is a reporter at TIME. Find her on Twitter at @Feifei_Sun or on Facebook

MORE: Read TIME managing editor Rick Stengel’s exclusive Q + A with Hillary Clinton.

Bright Young Things: Andrea Morales Wins TIME’s Next Generation Photography Contest

This fall, TIME invited student photographers dedicated to honing their craft—whether it be photojournalism, portraiture, still life, conceptual or fine art—to submit a portfolio of photos for review by our editors. All applicants had to be currently enrolled students or members of the class of 2011. After receiving hundreds of entries, the editors chose Andrea Morales as the winner of the inaugural competition.

Though they grew up on opposite sides of the country, Morales saw much of herself and her two younger sisters in the Glouster girls she photographed for Extracted Dreams, Implanted Realities, a series that examines the coming of age for young women in the southeast Ohio city. “It’s a project filled with daily things that happen when you’re growing up anywhere,” says the photographer. A Master’s candidate at the visual communication program at Ohio University, in Athens, Morales won the top prize of $2,500 and a portfolio review with the magazine’s photo editors.

Morales met many of the young women she photographed while roaming the streets in early 2009, and she has spent the majority of the last three years documenting them. The young women face poverty, drug abuse among family members and crime—all while attending class in Ohio’s poorest school district. As the project progressed, some of the girls’ parents began to see Morales as a mentor, which put the photographer in an unfamiliar situation. “It became this weird thing for a while because I come from a strict journalism background,” the photographer says. “But I totally care about these girls like crazy…I don’t know if I’m able to help them through my photographs. But I know I’m able to help them by being there for them.”

First runner up Christian Hansen, a senior at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, showcased a collection of personal work taken since 2006 from places ranging from California to Canada. “It’s mostly from going on road trips and traveling around,” he says. “I didn’t have any preconceived ideas about what I was trying to get or what I was trying to do. I just know what I like and I did it all based on feeling.”

Second runner up Brad Vest, also a Master’s candidate at the visual communication program at Ohio University, presented Adrift, a series that follows Travis Simmons’ struggles to stay off drugs and out of jail. Vest has captured the young father’s story since October 2009. “What drew me to his story was that it was always changing,” Vest says. “Initially I thought it would be a great story because it was a young guy who’d made some bad decisions early on, and was getting out, trying to start new. I thought it would be a great way to document the process of trying to start over.”

These three photographers’ work explored just a fraction of the subject matter covered in the entries TIME received during the contest call. And while not every entrant’s work could be displayed, the editors hope that this begins a dialogue with new talent that we hope to mentor over the next year.

Hiroshi Sugimoto “The First Light and the End of Its Time”

Hiroshi Sugimoto (杉本博司, Sugimoto Hiroshi), born on February 23, 1948, is a Japanese photographer currently dividing his time between Tokyo, Japan and New York City, USA. His catalog is made up of a number of series, each having a distinct theme and similar attributes. Hiroshi Sugimoto was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan. The Healing Codes . In 1970, Sugimoto studied politics and sociology at St. enterprise portal software . Pauls University in Tokyo. Later, he retrained as an artist and received his BFA in Fine Arts at the Art Center College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, California, two years later in 1972. Afterward, Sugimoto settled in New York City. Sugimoto has spoken of his work as an expression of time exposed, or photographs serving as a time capsule for a series of events in time. His work also focuses on transience of life, and the conflict between life and death. indiana foudation repair . Sugimoto is also deeply influenced by the writings and works of Marcel Duchamp, as well as the Dadaist and Surrealist movements as a whole. He has also expressed a great deal of interest in late 20th century modern architecture. His use of an 8×10 large-format camera and extremely long exposures have garnered Sugimoto a reputation as a photographer of the highest technical ability. He is equally acclaimed for the conceptual and philosophical aspects of his work.[citation needed] Sugimoto began his work with “Dioramas” in 1976, a series in which he photographed displays in natural history museums. The cultural assumption that cameras always show

Hiroshi Sugimoto / Time Exposed by Vilis Inde & inde/jacobs

This is a presentation of some of Sugimoto’s photographs from the portfolio “Time Exposed.” The portfolio consists of 50 images of different seascapes. yeastrol . LCD TVs . Music by Arvo Part. Atlanta Web Design . Prepared by Vilis Inde and inde/jacobs gallery of Marfa TX