Tag Archives: Time Travel

Defining identity & memory with "deep fried" photo portraits, and more


Deep Fried. 1997, C-print, 50.8cm x 61cm. carrera de fotografia . Chino Otsuka. Image courtesy of Huis Marseille.

At age 10, Japanese-born Chino Otsuka was sent away to a progressive private boarding school in Suffolk, England. For her first two years at the school, she was allowed to do nothing. Directory Submission . Then, following her own interests, she started to pursue education with an unrelenting intensity. A book she wrote, at age 15, about her culture-shock and quest for personal identity, made her an instant hero and celebrity back home in Japan. (Twenty years later, the book is still a “must read” for many young Japanese students.) She went on to pursue photography at the Royal Academy of Art, and began a life-long career exploring ideas of identity, memory, and mental time travel, through photography and video and writing.

A brilliant retrospective of her work fills the entire photography museum at Huis Marseille in Amsterdam. And an equally inspiring photobook has just been published: Photo Album by Chino Otsuka.

See and read more in Lens Culture.

TIME Style and Design: Futuristic London Fashion

For TIME Style & Design’s fashion shoot with British actors Tom Hiddleston and Michelle Dockery, photographer Jonathan de Villiers got to work on the roof of what is the tallest hospital in the world, Guy’s Hospital in London. And that wasn’t the only superlative in play: “This is, dare I say it, one of the best periods for British fashion,” says de Villiers. “There’s a whole crop of new young designers.”

Style & Design

Behind the scenes on the roof of Guy’s Hospital.

Fittingly for forward-looking designers, the shoot’s concept involved time travel from the future. The photographer, who hails from London but now lives in Paris, says that the city has recently embraced its own relationship with the future: in the last decade, the city seems to have recovered from backlash against ’60s modernism, he says, and its architecture has moved in a more avant-garde direction. Much of de Villiers’ work in Paris has to do with clichés about the fantasy of the city of lights, and he says that it was fun to get a chance to engage in similar reflection about his hometown—even if its archetypes are stuffier.

“People think of London as a very traditional city with a lot of old stuff, but in the last decade there’s been a kind of re-imagining,” he says. ”I think the most interesting thing to be said about this shoot is the whole question of projecting ideas about a place and how that carries through to clothes and perceptions of design.”

But for this shoot de Villiers’ vision of the future also had to conquer the present—or at least the present-day weather. Although the shoot featured British fashion designers’ spring/summer collections, it was very much winter. “It was bitterly cold at ground level, and I could see the clouds racing across the sky, and I was thinking ‘Oh my God, by the time we get up on that roof it’s going to be crippling,” says de Villiers of the rooftop shoot. “But the actors were quite game and the sun came out and everything.”

For a deeper look into that future—and a take on London from a different kind of future perspective—check out this video shot on the set: