Tag Archives: Time Magazine

Tearsheet of The Day | Narciso Contreras from Aleppo in Time

Most of the world’s media attention has been on Gaza for the week or so, but the fighting in Syria hasn’t been any quieter. Just yesterday we saw news reports of airstrikes by Syrian government damaging a hospital in Aleppo which killed 15 people and left as many as 40 missing.

Time magazine (Int’l ed.) ran an article about the Syria’s largest city in their last weekend’s issue. Opens with a striking photo by Narciso Contreras who has been filing photos from Aleppo for the Associated Press and Polaris.

pp. SEO Experts search engine marketing . 26-27. Time (Int’l ed.). November 26, 2012 issue.
Photo Narciso Contreras
Text on the spread: Cat and Mouse. Both regime and rebels have snipers at the ready. Rebel fighters are reflected in a mirror as they watch for enemies

Narciso Contrerasis a photojournalist born in Mexico City, whose work focuses on ‘feature stories, reportage and documentary based on religious communities, human nature and conflicts.’

Tearsheet of The Day | Time magazine’s Commemorative U.S. Election Special

Spent yesterday evening reading Time magazine’s latest issue, a U.S. election special, dated November 19, 2012, which came out last weekend. Thought I had had enough of the elections, but ended up staying up late into the night having found the magazine’s articles, commentaries, and photographs, pretty much unputdownable. Thought I’d share some of the issue’s brilliant photography here.

Brooks Kraft was following Obama for the magazine during the end of the presidential campaign. Below a terrific double spread of a photo, which can also be seen in the Lightbox slideshow, Last Days on the Road with Obama.

pp.38-39. Time (Int’l ed.). November 19, 2012.
Photo © Brooks Kraft for TIME
Caption: Stumping to victory. On the trail in Richmond, Va. – a state Obama narrowly won.

The issue also includes some brilliantly fascinating and quirky photos by Grant Cornett documenting the presidential campaign through physical objects. The work can be seen on Lightbox gallery, A History of the Campaign in 100 Objects.

pp.60-61. Time (Int’l ed.). November 19, 2012.
Photos © Grant Cornett for TIME
Left: Rick Perry’s Boots
Right: Michele Bachmann’s Suit

Finally, there’s also stunning portraits by the magazine’s contract photographer, Marco Grob, of some of the politicians who we might see running for the US presidency in four years’ time. The portraits can be seen on Lightbox under the title, TIME’s Class of 2016: The Political Leaders to Watch.

pp. 90-91. Time (Int’l ed.). November 19, 2012.
Photos © Marco Grob
Left: Condoleezza Rice, former Security of State, Republican.
Right: Joe Biden, Vice President, Former Delaware Senator, Democrat.

Brooks Kraft (American) is a New York born photographer based in Washington D.C. whose work is licensed through Corbis. His work appears frequently in Time.

Grant Cornett (American) is a Texas born photographer based in Brooklyn.

Marco Grob (Swiss, b.1965)  is a Swiss portrait and fashion photographer based in New York. He is a contract photographer with Time magazine.

Tearsheet of The Day | Yuri Kozyrev photo of Saddam’s ‘rat hole’ in FT Weekend

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, unveiled their survey of war photography, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, on Armistice Day yesterday. The FT Weekend magazine featured some of the work from the exhibition in their latest issue. You can view the FT article and slideshow here.  You can also read about the show over at Photo District News, which interviewed the exhibition’s curators.

Below war in Iraq photograph from 2003 by Yuri Kozyrev, which FT Weekend ran as a double truck.

p. 20-21. FT Weekend Magazine. November 10/11 2012 issue.
Photo © Yuri Kozyrev.
“A journalist climbs out of the hole where toppled dictator Saddam Hussein was captured in Ad Dawr. Iraq’s defeated leader raised his arms out of his ‘rat hole’ and said he was Saddam Hussein and that he wanted to negotiate. “ Iraq. December 15, 2003. Inkjet print.

Yuri Kozyrev (Russian, b. 1963) is a member of Noor Images and a contract photographer with Time magazine.

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters

Noh, Chadian Refugee,
London, 2011
Website – KatePeters.co.uk

Kate Peters, born Coventry, England in 1980, gained a BA (Hons) in Photography at Falmouth College of Arts, Cornwall in 2002 before moving to London where she is currently based. Her work has been exhibited worldwide and can regularly be seen in publications including Monocle, FT Weekend, The Independent New Review, Guardian Weekend, and The Telegraph. Her portrait of Julian Assange, the founder of Wikileaks, was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in December 2010 and included in the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize exhibition in November 2011. Kate’s first solo exhibition Stranger than Fiction was at the hpgrp Gallery in New York in February 2011. She has participated in numerous group shows including the Format Photography Festival in Derby, UK and the Darmstadter Tage der Fotografie in Germany. Several of her portraits form part of the permanent collection at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Laurent Chéhère’s Flying Houses

Inspired by the 1956 short French childrens film Le Ballon Rouge, or The Red Balloon, Laurent Chhres part analog, part digital images of floating houses are at once a charming, imaginative take on Paris, and also a wistful vision of dreams deferred. carrera de fotografia . The work will be shown from Oct. 25 to Dec. 8 at Galerie Paris-Beijing in Paris.

Before transitioning to photography, Chhre was an art director at a French advertising agency. He first saw Le Ballon Rouge when he was young, and upon revisiting it recently, described it as a merveille [wonder] of poetry. In 1960, TIME Magazine named its director, Albert Lamorisse, probably the most original moviemaker in France.

The film stars the directors 6-year-old son Pascal as an inquisitive, adventurous Parisian tot who discovers a bright red balloon in the street one day. Lamorisses Paris is a city drained of color, still suffering from the fallout of the war, populated by stern grownups and bullying children. It is against this surprisingly grim backdrop that our story takes place. The boy discovers that the balloon is not simply a shiny, bouncy thing to be led about on a string but rather a living, expressive, mischievous character unto itself. Without the use of CGI, the director is able to coax an amazing performance out of latex and helium, and the boy and the balloon become fast friends. Ultimately, the adventure story that ensues is an ode to possibility, dreams and escape.

Mary Evans/Ronald GrantEverett Collection

A scene from “The Red Balloon.”

Chhres world has a similar color palette of greys, blues and browns. And it too shares a dose of the fantastical: the main charactersin this case buildings he digitally constructed from architectural details photographed around Parisappear to float in the sky. But something is different. Unlike the playful balloon with its dancing string, these floating objects appear settled, as if stasis has overtaken them and age has crept in.

Notes from workaday life appear throughout the photo seriestelevision antennae, For Sale signs, McDonalds and graffiti. Laundry appears in two of the nine images. Chhre, who turned 40 this year, has replaced the balloons dancing string with electrical wires, which both sustain the houses and also tie them in place. The one exception is a grim, grey-blue brick house with prison-like windows. Here, the wires have snapped, a fire rages in the second story, the inhabitants escape ladder has broken and tumbles out of the frame. Resting by the window, silhouetted by the blaze, is a birdcage, about to be engulfed in flames.

Albert Lamorisse’s film has a happy ending; the ending of Chhres meditation on middle-age life remains uncertain.

Laurent Chhre is a photographer based in Paris. More of his work is available on his website.

Laurent Chéhère’s Flying Houses

Inspired by the 1956 short French childrens film Le Ballon Rouge, or The Red Balloon, Laurent Chhres part analog, part digital images of floating houses are at once a charming, imaginative take on Paris, and also a wistful vision of dreams deferred. The work will be shown from Oct. 25 to Dec. 8 at Galerie Paris-Beijing in Paris.

Before transitioning to photography, Chhre was an art director at a French advertising agency. He first saw Le Ballon Rouge when he was young, and upon revisiting it recently, described it as a merveille [wonder] of poetry. In 1960, TIME Magazine named its director, Albert Lamorisse, probably the most original moviemaker in France.

The film stars the directors 6-year-old son Pascal as an inquisitive, adventurous Parisian tot who discovers a bright red balloon in the street one day. Lamorisses Paris is a city drained of color, still suffering from the fallout of the war, populated by stern grownups and bullying children. It is against this surprisingly grim backdrop that our story takes place. The boy discovers that the balloon is not simply a shiny, bouncy thing to be led about on a string but rather a living, expressive, mischievous character unto itself. Without the use of CGI, the director is able to coax an amazing performance out of latex and helium, and the boy and the balloon become fast friends. Ultimately, the adventure story that ensues is an ode to possibility, dreams and escape.

Mary Evans/Ronald GrantEverett Collection

A scene from “The Red Balloon.”

Chhres world has a similar color palette of greys, blues and browns. And it too shares a dose of the fantastical: the main charactersin this case buildings he digitally constructed from architectural details photographed around Parisappear to float in the sky. But something is different. carrera de fotografia . Unlike the playful balloon with its dancing string, these floating objects appear settled, as if stasis has overtaken them and age has crept in.

Notes from workaday life appear throughout the photo seriestelevision antennae, For Sale signs, McDonalds and graffiti. Laundry appears in two of the nine images. Chhre, who turned 40 this year, has replaced the balloons dancing string with electrical wires, which both sustain the houses and also tie them in place. The one exception is a grim, grey-blue brick house with prison-like windows. Here, the wires have snapped, a fire rages in the second story, the inhabitants escape ladder has broken and tumbles out of the frame. Resting by the window, silhouetted by the blaze, is a birdcage, about to be engulfed in flames.

Albert Lamorisse’s film has a happy ending; the ending of Chhres meditation on middle-age life remains uncertain.

Laurent Chhre is a photographer based in Paris. More of his work is available on his website.

Greg Ruffing

OK, I admit it.  Exploring Greg Ruffing’s project on Yard Sales had me drooling over certain objects featured at some on the sales, and my first thought was: Where are these sales, and how fast can I get there?  I mean, who doesn’t want a set of owl lamps with crushed velvet shades?  My reaction is exactly what Greg is thinking about when he creates his work–our culture of consumption and the desire to have what we don’t need.

Greg Ruffing is a Chicago-based artist working in photography and mixed
media and often explores themes of consumption and the economy. His
works have been exhibited at the Annenberg Space for Photography
in Los Angeles, the New York Photo Festival, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the
Center for Fine Art Photography in Colorado, and elsewhere. In addition, his photographs
have appeared in publications such as TIME
Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Mother
Jones
, Smithsonian, The Atlantic Monthly, and others. Greg also runs an online
photography project titled Self-Guided Tour, a series of writings
about photography, art, and contemporary issues.

Greg has created a book on his Yard Sale work that has been included in the DIY: Photographers & Books exhibition that is currently on view at the Cleveland Museum of Art until the end of 2012. The book is a precursor to a larger publication he hopes to publish in 2013.

My series Yard Sales is focused on the
complexities of consumption: the ubiquity and disposability of consumer goods
and their ever-shifting value and meaning. In a way, these photographs are an
attempt to document the cycle of our pursuits in accumulating “stuff” (and our
relationship to that “stuff”), in a way that reveals fundamental human habits
and behaviors and their link to socioeconomic circumstance.

I was first drawn to yard sales as a sort of grassroots marketplace defined by the seller’s curious efforts of display and advertising to attract shoppers, and the buyer’s hunt for prized items and bargain prices. I was also interested in how the yard sale, as an event, transforms the private domestic space of the seller’s residence into a public commercial space to facilitate purchasing goods.

I’m also intrigued by how yard sales illustrate a specific dyadic complex of consumerism: on the one hand, they speak to our somewhat insatiable compulsion to shop and hoard possessions, and perhaps a certain cognitive blurring of the distinction between needs and wants (related to the process by which consumers assess and impose value and meaning onto material items).

And yet, on the other hand, it seems that yard sales (and other forms of resale) serve as a crucial antidote to much of the disposability and wastefulness inherent in consumerism – sending unwanted objects into secondary cycles of consumption where they may find renewed value or purpose through subsequent buyers.

Furthermore, I’ve undertaken this project in the context of the American economic Recession that began in 2008. In those past four years photographing this project, I’ve met and talked to countless families who, in the aftermath of financial hardship nationwide, have sold off possessions just to help pay their bills. In addition, while photographing yard sales in southwest Florida (which has continually had some of the highest home foreclosure rates in the U.S.), I met people who were selling goods obtained from an underground network of scavengers who take discarded possessions from the littered front yards of foreclosed and evicted homes.

It would seem that the Recession has brought decades of unbridled consumer spending (especially its emphasis as an economic engine) into question. Some navel-gazers have even wondered if we actually shopped ourselves into the Recession by living beyond our means through cheap credit, and many have spoken of pursuing a more austere lifestyle. Its in this framework that I hope my Yard Sales project can contribute to a sincere dialogue on and modest reformulation of our relationship to the items we choose to buy.

Chad Ress, Ballard v. Trinity Lacrosse

Chad Ress, Ballard v. Trinity Lacrosse

Chad Ress

Ballard v. Trinity Lacrosse,
Louisville, Kentucky, 2012
From the Common Ground – Seeking Community in America series
Website – ChadRess.com

Chad Ress, born in Kentucky, currently lives in Los Angeles. His imagery is landscape based with a focus on the social forces that shape these physical spaces. His project America Recovered – A Survery of the ARRA documents the stimulus bill of 2009 by combining his images with text provided by the government. It was accepted to Center / Review Santa Fe; awarded distinction by The Forward Thinking Museum; and recently published in both Time Magazine's Lightbox and The Wall Street Journal. Ress is currently a Katz fellow with Arizona State University and the Center for Social Cohesion, in conjunction with the New America Foundation. He is creating an archive of images documenting where Americans go, outside of work and home, to find a sense of community and connection to place.