Tag Archives: Time And Space

Spencer Murphy


All images © Spencer Murphy

Spencer Murphy’s name should ring a bell thanks to his editorial commissions which has seen his photography published in such places as The Guardian Weekend, Telegraph Magazine, New Statesman, and the FT Weekend. He has also been included in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize no less than five times!

Here though are extracts from a personal project, a delicate and visually understated series entitled The Abyss Gazes Into You. It offers a gentle and thoughtful glimpse of Murphy’s use of the landscape as inspiration and as a means to discover something within him.

“These images are a reflection of something inside myself – a feeling of both being trapped and floating endlessly in time and space, a mixture of hope and despair, desolation and beauty,” says Murphy.

“The sense, perhaps, of what it is to live a finite life in an infinite universe. They are pictures that, to me, hint at the unfathomable scale not only of the universe, but of life itself. They are instances in which, by accident or design, I have found myself staring once more into the abyss, and the abyss has momentarily returned my gaze.”

Lofty themes and grand claims, but does the work bear the weight of these words? Check out more from the series here and decide for yourselves. We are giving him the benefit of the doubt.

Born in 1978, Murphy grew up in the Kentish countryside and studied photography at University College Falmouth, graduating in 2002. Murphy now lives and works in London.

Senior Love Triangle: Photographs by Isadora Kosofsky

Three people—Jeanie, 82, Will, 84, and Adina, 90—are bound together in a relationship, a love triangle of sorts, a three-way connection that they rely on to shield them from the pains of loneliness and the fear of aging. Every day the trio meets near their senior-care facilities (each lives at a different location) to spend their remaining days together. Will picks up Jeanie at her care center, greeting her with a long kiss, and the two head hand-in-hand to collect Adina for whatever the day may bring.

Recently, that includes Isadora Kosofsky, who, after the death of the maternal grandmother who raised her, began to search for catharsis through photography. “Grief following my grandmother’s death unconsciously led me to photograph the lives and relationships of the elderly,” Kosofsky says.

The trio’s relationship clearly challenges cultural norms. Will, describing the trio’s bond to Kosofsky, said, “We live above the law. Not outside the law, but above the law. We are not outlaws.” Will, Jeanie and Adina are connected by more than time and space. “There are many different kinds of love,” Adina told Kosofsky. Their relationship, like all relationships, can be frustrating for all three. Jeanie once confided in Kosofsky that “to share Will is a thorn in your side…A relationship between a man and a woman is private. It’s a couple, not a trio.” But despite Jeanie’s misgivings, she must share Will with Adina and Adina must share Will with her.

Kosofsky met Jeanie, Will and Adina three short years after picking up a camera. “I befriended the group because I recognize a part of me in both Jeanie and Adina. Will, too, is familiar to me… a reflection of men I have known,” she says. “When I share in their lives, I am reminded of my adolescence.”

Kosofsky herself is not that far removed from adolescence. She is 18 years old and is now a documentary photographer based in Los Angeles—finding inspiration from photographers like Jane Evelyn Atwood, who spent years documenting one subject. Kosofsky believes long-term projects offer the opportunity of deeper and more poignant storytelling. In her own projects, it is her goal to “devote myself to living amongst my subjects as an occupant, rather than a visitor.”

“The aged are becoming increasingly hidden and disenfranchised. I noticed that even towards the end of my grandmother’s life, she appeared distant from society,” Kosofsky says. The photographer is currently engaged in photographing a three-part series on aging—a subject about which she is passionate. “I feel that age is a perceived barrier and that we too have once, either literally or figuratively, shared their fear of isolation and their wish for acknowledgement,” she explains. “Even when Jeanie and Adina are not present, Will walks with his right hand straight and open at his side, as if he were waiting for someone to hold on.”

Isadora Kosofsky is a Los Angeles-based documentary photographer. More of her work can be seen here.

Performance in Frames: Video Mobiles

>20120218-145532.jpg

The Roaming Eye missed this show at The Substation Gallery in Singapore but is intrigued:
“The artist’s body is captured into a series of frames, each frame a moment paused in time and space” from the programme.

20120218-144359.jpg
20120218-144651.jpg

Filed under: Art Galleries, Art shows, Performance art Tagged: Performance video, Singapore, The Substation Gallery

Under Exposed: the Roaming Eye gives photography and multimedia work by Nikki Luna and Emil Kozak cyber time and space

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings, the mother of one of the missing women opens a drawer

© Nikki Luna, Leaf Cuttings

 

Emil Kozak, Little White Plastic Bird

Emil Kozak, Big Black Nothing (2010-ongoing)

The Roaming Eye (tRE) comes across work in both physical and virtual spaces and will be presenting some of it under the heading Under Exposed. The aim is to support the less well-known, the small, and those who reach out to connect and share. There are many ways for photographers and visual artists to promote work; some have agents or galleries to do it for them, some have universities to push the work (and its reputation), some are brilliant DIY self-promoters. But then there are many, many others.

Those who are quieter; those who are still there – reading, looking and listening – who may push out occasionally, sometimes apologetically, often tentatively. Under Exposed is a space for these kind of photographers and visual artists – the ones who don’t overuse, or abuse, the social-media promotion machine, yet still feel that they have created something they want to share and to communicate. What have you got to lose? Certainly, you won’t lose face as cyberspace is the place to take risks.

So, Bring It On.

Get in Touch: If this sounds like you, or someone you know and want to support, then take a chance on the Roaming Eye and get in touch via email or the blog. Simply email some examples of work and/or a link. All work will be looked at and considered for inclusion. But remember, this is a curated blog so there is a filter system, but tRE likes to think its approach is open-minded and open-hearted. If you don’t agree, then why not comment. Web 2.0 was designed with dialogue in mind.

NIKKI LUNA
To kick off, tRE presents some images from Nikki Luna (whose website is, temporarily, in the process of being updated). Luna writes: “For the show, Shade my eyes and I can’t see you, (the title is from the lyrics of the Pink Floyd song Green is the Colour) my focus was to share the story of some women, who apart from being human-rights defenders, also chose to live and work with the poor, rural communities, teaching reading and writing. They were taken by military forces and were never seen again. Three of these women were killed by state security forces. The other two are still missing.

“These women are, first and foremost mothers, daughters, wives and sisters, and women to the people they have left behind. Not everyone may know, or understand, human-rights defenders, but we all know and have some close relationships with a woman in our lives. It’s sad that these women, all in their 20s, lost their lives and may be soon forgotten. The struggle to search and find them, the constant pushing for the truth, and the fact of injustice still goes on.”

For those who want to know more about the context, there’s an Amnesty International video documenting the story of the two women who are still missing. Note that the video The Escape of Raymond Manalo has subtitles and shows scenes of a graphic and disturbing nature.

“University of Philippines students Karen Empeno and Sherlyn Cadapan were among those who disappeared. Raymond Manalo, who was kidnapped by the Philippino army under the ex-General Jovito Palparan, was tortured but escaped and lived to tell the tale of his plight and of the other people he met in the camps. Among them were Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeno. He reports that he saw them naked and hanging upside down, while they had water poured on them, were hit and sexually violated”, writes Luna.

Luna will be showing work in a group show at the Equator Arts Project gallery at the Gillman Barracks in Singapore, as well as in two solo shows – firstly, at the Pablo Art Gallery in the Philippines from May 26 – June 23 where she has a video/photo projection and a soil/land installation and later in the year at the Manila Contemporary art gallery in September, date (tbc), where she will be creating a multimedia installation that includes stoneware.

EMIL KOZAK
On a different note, Emil Kozak who is from Denmark but lives in Spain, has two bodies of work Big Black Nothing (2010-ongoing) for which he walks until he “gets scared or can’t go any further, then takes a photo, and goes back” and Little White Plastic Bird – a project based on a true story.

Filed under: Photographers, Video Art, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Big Black Nothing, Denmark, Emil Kozak, Equator Arts Project, General Jovito Palparan, human rights, Karen Empeno, Leaf Cuttings, Little White Plastic Bird, Manila Contemporary, Nikki Luna, Philippines, Raymond Manalo, Sherlyn Cadapan, the Roaming Eye

Jeff Cowen: Photographic Works exhibition in Cologne

Jeff Cowen, Nature Mort 1, 2010, Silver Print, 60 x 80 cm, Edition of 6.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Nature Mort 1, 2010, Silver Print, 60 x 80 cm, Edition of 6.

For the first time, the highly-regarded Michael Werner art gallery in Cologne (with other galleries in Germany and New York), will be presenting photography-based artworks.

From the gallery statement:

Michael Werner Kunsthandel, Cologne presents an exhibition by Jeff Cowen titled “Photographic Works beginning on January 28th. The artist tests the boundaries between photography, painting, drawing and sculpture. Comcast Cable California . Cowen works on a thick silver based paper, which he cuts, collages and attacks with various chemicals and specialized darkroom techniques. The evolution from the photographic image to the unique and painterly final print may take the artist months or even years. This process is consciously controlled only to some extent, but not entirely predetermined. Cowen is on a quest for something he rationally does not understand, but senses and knows exists. His photographic images transcend time and space. He writes: “Making a photograph for me is a paradox, a sacred and violent act. You kill a moment and eternalize it. seo hosting . There is a mysterious metamorphosis that transpires of which I am continuously surprised and in awe of. Its a transformative process for the observer and the observed.

Jeff Cowen was born in 1966 in New York City. In 1988 he graduated in Oriental Studies as a University Honors Scholar from New York University and Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon graduation, he continued photographing intensively on the streets of New York and worked as an assistant to Larry Clark. In the course of the 1990s his artistic approach was influenced and altered by his study of drawing and painting. This further informed the artists search for the relation between the photographic picture and abstraction. Cowen has been based in Paris and now Berlin since 2001. The Cologne exhibition reveals works of these past ten years including still life, landscape, figure, and abstraction. In many of the works, one senses Cowens interest with what he calls the non-moment, i.e. the point in time just before or after something has happened. Cable Internet Packages . Like silence, my images can best be described by what they are not.

Jeff Cowen, Nature Morte 9, 2010, Silver Print, 81 x 61 cm, Edition of 1.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Nature Morte 9, 2010, Silver Print, 81 x 61 cm, Edition of 1.

Jeff Cowen, Sienna, 2002, Silver Print, 127 x 170 cm, Edition of 6.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Sienna, 2002, Silver Print, 127 x 170 cm, Edition of 6.

Jeff Cowen, Alice, 2001, Silver Print, 188 x 127 cm, Edition of 8.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Alice, 2001, Silver Print, 188 x 127 cm, Edition of 8.

Jeff Cowen: Photographic Works
January 28 – March 24, 2012
Michael Werner Kunsthandel Gallery
Gertrudenstrae 24-28
50667 Cologne
Germany

If You Smoke Cigarettes in Public: Prostitution in Morocco

In 2010, the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University awarded the twentieth Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize to photographer Tiana Markova-Gold and writer Sarah Dohrmann to produce their project If You Smoke Cigarettes in Public, You Are a Prostitute: Women and Prostitution in Morocco. The pair spent three and a half months of this year in the country, documenting the lives of sex workers to explore the complex nature of the choices Moroccan women face.

They approached the project with the express intent to “dismantle preconceived notions of the prostitute as sexual deviant,” an idea that Markova-Gold has explored in earlier projects on her own in the Bronx and Macedonia. Dohrmann had previously lived in Morocco, where she learned Moroccan Arabic and had begun writing about her interactions with female Moroccan sex workers. Their method is collaborative and unconventional, pairing Markova-Gold’s impressionistic and occasionally inscrutable photographs with Dohrmann’s narrative and very personal literary style. With time and space, the pair was able to cultivate deep and nuanced relationships with several women, resulting in a complex and holistic story. Working in a developing Islamic country during the Arab Spring allowed the pair to explore how other issues affected the subjects of their project, such as globalization, religion, politics and migration.

A wide-ranging and challenging subject deserves such a patient and extensive approach, and the pair has recently begun to work with their material in earnest. Typically the work for the Lange-Taylor prize is not revealed until the project is finished, but Dohrmann and Markova-Gold agreed to share some of the ideas they are working on exclusively with LightBox.

Markova-Gold shot primarily with film, but also used her iPhone to provide more instant feedback and evidence of the situations she was shooting. The photographs in the series above consist of iPhone photos, processed with the ShakeItPhoto app, which she found to be the closest approximation to her film work.  As the project progressed, she found the images resonated beyond their immediate use and ultimately are relevant to the final project. They are paired with some of Dohrmann’s preliminary writing, which was written in a daily log of their time together, and focuses on one of their subjects, Khadija. The final project, slated for completion by the end of the year, will feature film and digital photography from Markova-Gold, and a long-form essay by Dohrmann.

Editor’s note: All of the Moroccan women’s names published here have been changed in the interest of protecting their safety.

Tiana Markova-Gold is a freelance documentary photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. More of her work can be seen on her web site and her blog.

Sarah Dohrmann is a Brooklyn-based writer. Her work has appeared in Bad Idea: The Anthology, Teachers & Writers Magazine, and The Iowa Review. You can read more of her work on her blog, Und You Vill Like It.

Photographer #388: Kim Boske

Kim Boske, 1978, The Netherlands, is an experimental photographer based in Amsterdam. She studied at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. Her photography deals with time, perspectives and space. It is a research in which time and space run together. She focuses on the mutability of things. In her series Mapping she merged different moments in time, investigating how physical movement in time and space change our perspectives. She photographed trees from different angles and when all the images are combined we actually see the tree in its entirety. She created images of flowers that combine several shots of the same object. The changing of light during the day was an important factor. Kim’s photographs reveal phenomena that are impossible to see or witness with the naked eye. Her work has been exhibited at several venues in the world and a large number of Dutch exhibition spaces. The following images come from the series Mapping, Collection of Sleepings and Awakanings and I Go Walking In Your Landscape.


Website: www.kimboske.com

What’s next?

Coinciding with FOAM‘s tenth anniversary is a forward-looking micro-site: What’s Next. The site a selection of articles and reflections by some of the most interesting minds in photography today, covering everything from the future of the institution to the effects of digital media on photography.

The good people at FOAM say: “The question ‘What’s Next?’ is founded in our conviction that photography has fundamentally changed during the last twenty years. And this process of change and transition might not be finished yet. The digitalization of the medium has altered every aspect of photography, whether it is the photograph as an object, the position of the professional photographer, the function of the photo lab, the news agency or the photography museum.

In fact the question ‘What’s Next?’ is about far more than ‘just’ the future of photography. It is also about the future of a society dictated by visual media, of a society in which people primarily communicate with technological tools that have been developed and made into consumer products with incredible speed. It is about the future of a society in which every layman can and will be a photographer, sharing his experiences with newly made online communities, a society in which the experience of time and space have drastically changed.”

In conjunction with the website FOAM recently held a fascinating symposium, a few video clips of which you can see here:

To see more videos like this from FOAM click here