Tag Archives: Tim Clark

The 1000 Words Award

The 1000 Words Award for European photographers is a major initiative in collaboration with The Other European Travellers, a project co-ordinated by Cobertura Photo and co-organised by Atelier de Visu, 1000 Words and Festival Voci di Foto in partnership with Magnum Photos. It is part-funded by The Education Audiovisual and Culture Exchange Agency (EACEA) under the auspices of the EU Culture Programme.

Photographers are invited to apply for an opportunity to realise a new body of work with the supervision of several high-profile photographers and industry experts.

Applications can be submitted online only. The closing date is 23 July 2012 (5pm GMT). There are 4 places available.

Fee: £25.00 (GBP)

The 1000 Words Award includes:

• £1,000 cash prize
• 18 month mentorship programme
• 3 workshops with Jeffrey Silverthorne, Antoine d’Agata and Patrick Zachmann in London, Marseille and Seville respectively, including financial assistance with accommodation and travel
• Travelling group exhibition through the UK, France, Spain and Italy
• Catalogue and DVD
• Feature in 1000 Words Photography Magazine.

The 1000 Words Award is open to photographers born or based in the EU.

An internationally renown jury will review each entry submitted. Their final 4 will join 8 other European photographers selected by Cobertura Photo and Atelier de Visu.

The 1000 Words Award selection panel is:

• Simon Baker, Curator of Photography at Tate
• Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, London
• Dewi Lewis, Director at Dewi Lewis Publishing
• Tim Clark and Michael Grieve, Editors at 1000 Words Photography Magazine.

All participants will be selected according to criteria of excellence of their artistic approach, gender parity, mix of backgrounds, diversity of concepts and the multiplicity of approaches.

How to apply

1. Please email a portfolio of 10-15 images from any previous project (JPEG format, 72 dpi, each image no larger than 1MB). Links to work online will not be considered
2. An artist statement of up to 150 words or a CV (You do not need to send a proposal for the new body of work at this stage)
3. Submission fee: £25 (Through Paypal please enter your name and use the “Buy Now” button below, or send a cheque made payable to 1000 Words Photography Ltd: to 1000 Words Photography, 29 The Arthaus, 205 Richmond Road, London, E8 3FF, UK)

Deadline: 23 July 2012 (5pm GMT)
Email submissions to: [email protected]




Eligibility

The 1000 Words Award is open to photographers of any age, born or based within the EU. Students in full-time or part-time education, including PhD students, are also eligible for the award. Applicants do not need to have completed a degree in photography or an art-based subject. Photographers working collaboratively can also apply.

Selection procedure

Application closing date: 23 July 2012
Receipt of applications acknowledged: 24 July 2012
Successful candidates announced: 6 August 2012
First local meeting: 26 September 2012
Workshop in Seville: 29 October – 3 November 2012
Second local meeting: 12 December 2012
Third local meeting: 20 February 2013
Workshop in London: March 2013
Fourth local meeting: 15 May 2013
Workshop in Marseille: July 2013
Catalogue launch: December 2013
Travelling exhibition: January 2014-

Workshops


© Jeffrey Silverthorne


Through his photography Jeffrey Silverthorne explores the question of sex and death, as well as the notions of boundary and transgression. Active since the end of the 60’s, he has been accumulating series on extreme subjects: a slaughter house, a morgue, brothels or a community of transvestites and transsexuals. Silverthorne abandons any notion of objective documentation, and instead further exposes himself and explores his own psychology in a series of intense and subjectively structured images. Born in Hawaii in 1946, Silverthorne studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and has gone on to publish his work in the books Directions For Leaving, Boystown, The Perfume of Desire and most recently Travel Plans in 2011. He has had numerous international exhibitions including Rencontres d’Arles and Musée de l’ Elysée. Jeffrey Silverthorne is represented by Agence Vu’ and Gallery Vu’ .

© Antoine d’Agata

Antoine d’Agata is without doubt one of the most unique and important photographers of our age. His imagery is characterised by an intense and highly subjective experience that pushes the limits of social documentary photography. Born in Marseille, 1961, he left France in 1990 to study at The International Centre for Photography (ICP) in New York alongside Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. His work has been published in the books Insomnia, Vortex, Stigma and Agonie amongst others, and he has been exhibited internationally at galleries and festivals including Rencontres d’Arles, Noorderlicht, FotoFreo and The Photographers Gallery, London. His latest exhibition, Anticorps, a world premiere of a grand touring overview, opened on the 26 May at The Hague Museum of Photography, and runs until the 3 September. He has been a member of Magnum Photos since 2004 and is represented by Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire in Paris.

Their workshops are designed to allow photographers to experiment with new approaches to the creative process. You will be encouraged to build intimate rapport with your subjects, incorporating personal vision and voice into your photography.

The topic of “The Other European Travellers” specifically relates to transformations in the lives of people who have travelled or migrated across Europe. It is also broad to allow you the freedom to produce more personal and self-experienced responses as well as conceptual interpretations of the brief.

A unique element of these workshops is marked by the involvement of several guest experts comprising photographers as well as curators, collectors and critics who will provide the following:

-Talks and seminars 
-Guided tours of exhibitions
-Visits to photo archives and family albums
-Access to private collections.

Each workshop lasts 5 days, and will be conducted in English. They will form the basis of your project.

Mentorship

Monthly group and one-to-one meetings with the 1000 Words editors will be held in London or by Skype/Internet to report on the progress of the participants’ projects. Sessions will be frank and informal with the view to providing photographers with the following:

-Discussion and critique of creative output
-The practical and conceptual vision needed to help attain your goals and develop the photographic project
-Assistance with self-representation, portfolio presentation and approaches to potential outlets in the editorial, publishing and gallery markets
-Resources to help enhance your work and realise the potential of your ideas.

Exhibitions

The workshop leaders (Jeffrey Silverthorne, Antoine d’Agata and Patrick Zachmann) and the participating photographers in The Other European Travellers project will show their work as a group exhibition in London, Seville and Marseille. The exhibition will then travel to other cultural venues, galleries and photography festivals across Europe. 

An innovative and engaging exhibition design will mix images, text and sound.

Catalogue and DVD

The publication will consist of the participants’ work alonside archive images and includes texts on the subject. The publication will be translated into 3 languages and have a print run of 1,500 copies. The accompanying DVD and sound files contribute to the project, and are based on material from different sources: interviews with the photographic subjects, sound files and musical scores. 

Feature on 1000 Words Photography Magazine

1000 Words will commission a highly-esteemed writer or photography critic to contribute an in-depth review of your final body of work which will be published in its distinctive and highly regarded online magazine alongside a carefully curated selection of your images.

Now on its fourteenth “issue” 1000 Words attracts approximately 140,000 unique visitors from more 120 countries every month. Its sister-site, the 1000 Words Blog, ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs in a survey carried out by Creative Tourist in May 2010 and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts’ Photography Blog of The Year Award 2010.

Farewell 2011, hello 2012!

And so another year passes. We hope you have all had a happy, healthy holiday season and here’s to a prosperous 2012! As ever, thanks to everyone who has supported and worked with 1000 Wordsduring this past year. Here are some of our organisation’s highlights:

-the appointment of a board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark


-the announcement that our sister-site, the 1000 Words blog, was named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts’ Photography Blog of The Year Award


-two 1000 Words Workshops with Anders Petersen and Erik Kessels that took place in the beautifully evocative medina of Fez, Morocco


-1000 Words editors, Tim Clark and Michael Grieve’s
participation in a panel discussion on “galleries” for photography with Linda Berlin and Toni Cederteg, Library Man; and Kristin Bråten, Director, Gallery Riis in association with Objectiv in Oslo, Norway

-curation of a slideshow featuring Anna Linderstram, JH Engström and Viviane Sassen at Łódź International Festival of Photography, Poland


-three issues of 1000 Words Photography Magazine, based around themes of Aporia, Hidden and Thereness, released in February, May and October respectively


-sponsoring The Salon Photo Prize 2011, in which thirty-five early-career photographers were exhibited at Matt Roberts Arts on Vyner Street, East London with one exhibitor, EJ Major, winning the selectors’ prize supported by 1000 Words consisting of £1000 and a subsequent solo exhibition


-Tim Clark, Editor in Chief at 1000 Words, joining the Academy of Nominators for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize and also co-judging FreshFacedandWildEyed2011, the fourth annual competition for recent graduates organised by The Photographers’ Gallery, alongside Edmund Clark, Photographer; Louise Clements, Artistic Director, QUAD and Format International Photography Festival; and Brett Rogers, Director, The Photographers’ Gallery


Hands in the fire with Erik Kessels

© Michael Grieve / 1000 Words

During the month of September 1000 Words held its third workshop in the medina of Fez, Morocco. This time we invited energetic Dutch man, Erik Kessels, curator, publisher and top banana at KesselsKrammer creative agency, to conduct an interesting and unique workshop that surprised and challenged the participants. Erik is one of those special people who injects a lateral perspective into the minds of those willing to take up a conceptual yet free thinking disposition. And as a passionate collector of anonymous photographs Erik always found the time to hunt in the medina for those vernacular gems hiding in the most unlikely places and lost on the pages of dusty albums.

1000 Words (Michael Grieve and Tim Clark) would like to thank all the participants for a productive workshop and for making the workshop a pleasant and relaxed environment. The participants were:

Alan Nielsen (Brazil)
Natasha Caruana (UK)
Alessandra Ferragina (Italy)
Hyseung Jeon (South Korea)
Hil Van Der Waal (The Netherlands)
Andy Nelson (UK)

We, of course, would like to thank Erik Kessels for his teaching skills and powers of motivation and our local assistant, Omar Chennafi, and Stephen DiRenza for allowing us to use his beautiful riad for the week.

1000 Words is organising four more workshops in Fez for 2012 with some of the finest photographers and artists the world has to offer including Roger Ballen (others still to be confirmed), and will be making a call for submissions very soon.

© Michael Grieve / 1000 Words

1000 Words Portfolio Review Consultations

The more eagle-eyed of our readers will be aware that we recently started providing in-depth portfolio review consultations for photographers. In the three years since launch, 1000 Words has grown in both scale of operations and size of audience meaning that submissions for potential publication in the magazine have also increased significantly. (Upon opening my emails this morning, I realised that there are currently 491 submissions sitting in my inbox from the month of June alone.)

Whilst we do take the time to look at each and every one of these we regret that we can not always respond quickly so please be patient with us. Denver Towing . However, if you would like to receive specific advice and feedback on your work we have introduced these frank and informal review sessions with the view to providing photographers with the following:

-Critique of creative output
-The practical and conceptual vision needed to help attain your goals and develop further photographic projects
-Assistance with self-representation, portfolio presentation and approaches to potential outlets in the editorial, publishing and gallery markets
-Resources to help enhance your work.

Portfolio reviews cost 90 and last one hour. ircc.edu . They take place at a studio in East London and consist of two one-on-one sessions with 1000 Words editors, Tim Clark and Michael Grieve.

To book a portfolio review or for more information contact: portfolio(at)1000wordsmag(dot)com

1000 Words Portfolio Review Consultations

The more eagle-eyed of our readers will be aware that we recently started providing in-depth portfolio review consultations for photographers. domain names . In the three years since launch, 1000 Words has grown in both scale of operations and size of audience meaning that the amount of portfolios submitted to the magazine for potential publication has also increased significantly. The sheer volume is staggering. recycled drinking glasses . (Upon opening my emails this morning, I realised that there are currently 491 submissions sitting in my inbox from the month of June alone.)

Whilst we do take the time to look at each and every one of these we regret that we can not always respond. However, if you would like to receive specific advice and feedback on your work we have introduced frank and informal review sessions with the view to providing photographers with the following:

-Critique of creative output
-The practical and conceptual vision needed to help attain your goals and develop further photographic projects
-Assistance with self-representation, portfolio presentation and approaches to potential outlets in the editorial, publishing and gallery markets
-Resources to help enhance your work.

Portfolio reviews cost 90 and last one hour. They take place at our offices in East London or at your studio if you have one/if it is more convenient and consist of two one-on-one sessions with 1000 Words editors, Tim Clark and Michael Grieve.

To book a portfolio review or for more information contact: portfolio(at)1000wordsmag(dot)com

Photography, publishing and the internet

The words “photography” and “publishing” are natural bedfellows, intertwined for as long as anyone can remember. Historically speaking, the printed page was the ultimate venue for viewing a photographer’s work but in recent years the internet has profoundly changed the way we look at and think about photography. So who’s hogging the duvet now?

In a recent interview, Lesley Martin, publisher of the Aperture Foundation’s book programme, ventured the following: “The mystery for me is that the photobook audience has become more educated, more interested, more connected to the idea of the photobook – yet for the most part, sales are not shooting through the roof to a corresponding degree.”

Printing photobooks can be very expensive, meaning that print runs are usually small. Publishing online on the other hand is fast, fluid and flexible, costs a fraction of the price but offers an audience infinitely larger choice to boot. Yes, I understand the arguments; Photobooks are collectable. Photobooks offer an intimate and tactile viewing experience. Photobooks are the perfect “lap medium” as the great John Gossage famously said. And yes I am also fully aware that there is a certain stigma attached to the broad access to photography online from some fraternities of the photo world, although thankfully this is gradually fading. Image overload, viewing images on screen and the many things that can ping or pop up at you at once are just some of the common gripes from the digital naysayers. But I’m not arguing for one over the other. Frankly, I’m tired of the analogue versus digital debate. It is as inevitable as it tedious. I prefer to think that we are constantly moving, and that photographic debates and wider creative concerns provide opportunities for us to think on lateral terms, in other words, how can we arrive at a certain point from a different perspective.

What is true is that the sheer volume of images we digest on a daily basis not just on the internet but in the world around us is staggering, something that will only increase at exponential speeds in tandem with developments in technology. Camera phones, social media platforms and the Flickr ecosystem have in effect created a vast sprawling suburb of mediocrity.

So what to make of this slew of imagery? Now, more than ever, when instead of maybe going to galleries and museums we are finding ourselves more frequently viewing websites of photographers as way of discovering new work, there exists a very strong need to expose the meaningful images, promote, curate, share, and, most crucially, review and critique them intelligently.

Tiny Vices, an online gallery and image archive founded in 2005 by one time photo editor at Vice-cum-independent curator and photographer, Tim Barber, was probably the first to do its level best to respond to this challenge, and consequently helped to firmly establish the internet as a legitimate platform for disseminating photography. Offering an eclectic dip into hundreds of portfolios from artists such as Ryan McGinley and Dash Snow to Gus Powell and Craig Mammano, the website quickly become a wildly popular and accessible showcase with its well defined sensibility and thoughtful selection of work. Hundreds of new images were sent in for consideration every month in response to a continuous open call for submissions. By virtue of being web-based, Tiny Vices removed hurdles and facilitated genuine global dialogue and exchange of ideas for people who would never normally have the opportunity to interact in such a way. It fostered a great community. Such was its influence and reach that Barber was invited by Spencer Brownstone Gallery, New York to put on a physical exhibition during March, 2006. Reflecting the DIY, punk ethic of the website, it comprised a complex installation of photographs, drawings, and paintings by over sixty of the artists, well known and hitherto unknown, that had been featured online. Tiny Vices is a shining example of how two complimentary modes of production can be incorporated in an interesting and innovative way, whilst at the same time ushering in a radical rethinking of what constitutes a curator. Much could be said, much doubtless will be said about whether bloggers are the curators of the 21st Century.

Another website worthwhile bookmarking or better still saving as your home page is Jason Evans’ visual diary, The Daily Nice. Presenting one image per day, his lo-fi website which first went live in 2004 consists of just one page, with just one picture on it. Familiar and spontaneous yet strangely compelling, the images taken by Evans are snapshots of commonplace situations, people, animals, objects, landscapes and the urban environment that convey a fragile, transient beauty. Evans has himself described The Daily Nice as “a retreat – a sheltered harbour, where you can rest for a minute.”

Since June 2008 I have been publishing and editing 1000 Words, an independent, opinionated online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography. Released quarterly, each “issue” is loosely based on a theme, and features exhibition and photo book reviews, interviews, essays and multimedia. 1000 Words believes in merit and strives to feature works that represent creative skill, emotion, intelligence and that certain something that cannot be pinned down by words.

Whether we like it or not we are moving in an age where we will always be connected to the internet, and where the smart phone will become someone’s digital identity. We are living in a time of accelerated consumption and shortened attention spans. In this information era we are allowed to – and even encouraged to – know very little but there has to be more to it than just an internet sugar rush. 1000 Words abides by the philosophy of the “slow web movement” and therefore requires you to take your time and savour what you consume.

The next issue of 1000 Words – Hidden – will hit the digital shelves 13 May.

This article was originally published by Raconteur Media and appeared in The Times, Saturday 23 April, 2011.

Photography, publishing and the internet

The words “photography” and “publishing” are natural bedfellows, intertwined for as long as anyone can remember. Historically speaking, the printed page was the ultimate venue for viewing a photographer’s work but in recent years the internet has profoundly changed the way we look at and think about photography. So who’s hogging the duvet now?

In a recent interview, Lesley Martin, publisher of the Aperture Foundation’s book programme, ventured the following: “The mystery for me is that the photobook audience has become more educated, more interested, more connected to the idea of the photobook – yet for the most part, sales are not shooting through the roof to a corresponding degree.”

Printing photobooks can be very expensive, meaning that print runs are usually small. Publishing online on the other hand is fast, fluid and flexible, costs a fraction of the price but offers an audience infinitely larger choice to boot. Yes, I understand the arguments; Photobooks are collectable. Photobooks offer an intimate and tactile viewing experience. Photobooks are the perfect “lap medium” as the great John Gossage famously said. And yes I am also fully aware that there is a certain stigma attached to the broad access to photography online from some fraternities of the photo world, although thankfully this is gradually fading. Image overload, viewing images on screen and the many things that can ping or pop up at you at once are just some of the common gripes from the digital naysayers. But I’m not arguing for one over the other. Frankly, I’m tired of the analogue versus digital debate. It is as inevitable as it tedious. I prefer to think that we are constantly moving, and that photographic debates and wider creative concerns provide opportunities for us to think on lateral terms, in other words, how can we arrive at a certain point from a different perspective.

What is true is that the sheer volume of images we digest on a daily basis not just on the internet but in the world around us is staggering, something that will only increase at exponential speeds in tandem with developments in technology. Camera phones, social media platforms and the Flickr ecosystem have in effect created a vast sprawling suburb of mediocrity.

So what to make of this slew of imagery? Now, more than ever, when instead of maybe going to galleries and museums we are finding ourselves more frequently viewing websites of photographers as way of discovering new work, there exists a very strong need to expose the meaningful images, promote, curate, share, and, most crucially, review and critique them intelligently.

Tiny Vices, an online gallery and image archive founded in 2005 by one time photo editor at Vice-cum-independent curator and photographer, Tim Barber, was probably the first to do its level best to respond to this challenge, and consequently helped to firmly establish the internet as a legitimate platform for disseminating photography. Offering an eclectic dip into hundreds of portfolios from artists such as Ryan McGinley and Dash Snow to Gus Powell and Craig Mammano, the website quickly become a wildly popular and accessible showcase with its well defined sensibility and thoughtful selection of work. Hundreds of new images were sent in for consideration every month in response to a continuous open call for submissions. By virtue of being web-based, Tiny Vices removed hurdles and facilitated genuine global dialogue and exchange of ideas for people who would never normally have the opportunity to interact in such a way. It fostered a great community. Such was its influence and reach that Barber was invited by Spencer Brownstone Gallery, New York to put on a physical exhibition during March, 2006. Reflecting the DIY, punk ethic of the website, it comprised a complex installation of photographs, drawings, and paintings by over sixty of the artists, well known and hitherto unknown, that had been featured online. Tiny Vices is a shining example of how two complimentary modes of production can be incorporated in an interesting and innovative way, whilst at the same time ushering in a radical rethinking of what constitutes a curator. Much could be said, much doubtless will be said about whether bloggers are the curators of the 21st Century.

Another website worthwhile bookmarking or better still saving as your home page is Jason Evans’ visual diary, The Daily Nice. Presenting one image per day, his lo-fi website which first went live in 2004 consists of just one page, with just one picture on it. Familiar and spontaneous yet strangely compelling, the images taken by Evans are snapshots of commonplace situations, people, animals, objects, landscapes and the urban environment that convey a fragile, transient beauty. Evans has himself described The Daily Nice as “a retreat – a sheltered harbour, where you can rest for a minute.”

Since June 2008 I have been publishing and editing 1000 Words, an independent, opinionated online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography. Released quarterly, each “issue” is loosely based on a theme, and features exhibition and photo book reviews, interviews, essays and multimedia. 1000 Words believes in merit and strives to feature works that represent creative skill, emotion, intelligence and that certain something that cannot be pinned down by words.

Whether we like it or not we are moving in an age where we will always be connected to the internet, and where the smart phone will become someone’s digital identity. We are living in a time of accelerated consumption and shortened attention spans. In this information era we are allowed to – and even encouraged to – know very little but there has to be more to it than just an internet sugar rush. 1000 Words abides by the philosophy of the “slow web movement” and therefore requires you to take your time and savour what you consume.

The next issue of 1000 Words – Hidden – will hit the digital shelves 13 May.

This article was originally published by Raconteur Media and appeared in The Times, Saturday 23 April, 2011.

1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH ERIK KESSELS IN MOROCCO, SEPTEMBER 2011

*17.07.11 THERE ARE STILL TWO PLACES AVAILABLE-APPLY NOW!-DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 14.08.11!*

After two very successful workshops with Antoine d’Agata and Anders Petersen, 1000 Words is very pleased to present its third with Erik Kessels in Fez, Morocco (12-17 September 2011). Though the camera will be the tool, this workshop will appeal to creatives from all visual disciplines, not just photography.

“Nowadays, we consume images without really looking at them. It’s every photographer’s duty to make images that stand out from the daily visual clutter.” Erik Kessels

Please scroll down for more information and how to submit.

ERIK KESSELS:

Erik Kessels’ list of achievements are extensive. He is best described as a curator and publisher who conceptualises vernacular photography and produces unusual artworks. He is a founding partner and Creative Director of the highly successful and innovative advertising agency, KesselsKrammer in Amsterdam (yes, that is the actual website). He has won numerous awards and KesselsKramer comprises of thirty eight people from eight different countries and has been operating since 1996. He has designed, edited and published several books on vernacular photography through KesselsKramer Publishing – including the in almost every picture series, The Instant Men and Wonder. Since 2000, he has been an editor of the alternative photography magazine Useful Photography.

Erik is also noted for his particularly original curated exhibitions such as Loving Your Pictures at the Centraal Museum Utrecht, The Netherlands and at Les Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie, Arles. He was one of four curators (alongside Lou Reed, Fred Ritchin and Vince Aletti) of the New York Photo Festival 2010 where he presented the exhibition Use Me Abuse Me.

Aside from all that, Erik is a very nice man with a creative spirit second to none. His conceptual approach and playful attitude will push those who are open to exploring more lateral ways of image-making.

ABOUT US:

The organisation’s flagship is 1000 Words, an online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography in the UK and beyond. It reviews exhibitions and photobooks and publishes interviews, essays and multimedia. We are committed to showing the work of lesser-known but significant artists alongside that of established photographers in the aim of bringing their work to a wider audience. Often incredibly diverse in terms of subjects, concepts, styles and techniques, yet by covering a wide spectrum of genres 1000 Words intends to make us reconsider the contemporary photograph.

Released quarterly, the magazine attracts over 140,000 unique visitors from more than 75 countries every month. In May 2010 the 1000 Words Blog was ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs as part of a survey carried out by Creative Tourist and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts’ Photography Blog of the Year Award, 2010.

Yet 1000 Words is much more than just an online magazine. It is the first step in our concept. 1000 Words also operates a programme of exhibitions and events including four annual workshops in Fez, Morocco as well as talks, portfolio reviews, prizes and awards. In July 2010, we launched the 1000 Words Collection, in partnership with Troika Editions, offering limited edition photography prints at affordable prices from artists including Simon Roberts, JH Engstrom, Bruno Quinquet, Sarah Small, Trinidad Carrillo, Andrew Bruce, Leigh Ledare, Nuno Cera and Virgilio Ferreira.

1000 Words is governed by its board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are: Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark. The 1000 Words Workshops are organised by Tim Clark, founder and editor-in-chief at 1000 Words and Michael Grieve, 1000 Words deputy editor, lecturer at Nottingham Trent University and a photographer represented by Agence Vu.

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:

The 1000 Words Workshop takes place in an authentically restored riad situated in the medieval medina, at the heart of the beautifully evocative city of Fez, Morocco. The workshop will be an intense experience lasting six days between 12-17 September 2011 and will consist of 12 participants. The medina is a vibrant labyrinth that will permeate all the senses. Surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, it offers a visually stunning backdrop for this truly unique workshop.

We are looking for a diverse range of participants who understand the work of Erik Kessels and feel that their own art will benefit from his guidance. As we said before, though the camera will be the tool, this workshop will appeal to creatives from all visual disiplines, not just photography.

“A lot of photographers are looking into ways to make their work public,” says Erik Kessels. “Almost every photographer has their own website. But for a lot of photographers, there is also a strong need to publish a book or have an exhibition. How do you communicate these needs to the outside world? Also, which kind of tools are there to use?”

Erik Kessels will first give a lecture about his own experiences on these subjects. There will then be a workshop where photographers will find their own way to proceed in their future work. Subjects will be: ‘How to edit your own photographs?’ ‘Self publishing’ and ‘How can photographers communicate about their own work?’.

Over the course of several days there will be different short briefs for the attending photographers. These will teach them to be more playful and communicative with their own work.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:

The cost of the workshop will be £1250 for 6 days. Once participants have been selected they will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit of £350 within two weeks. Participants can then pay the rest of the fee according to deadlines (see below). Participants are encouraged to arrive the day before the workshop begins for a welcome dinner. The price includes:

-tuition from Erik Kessels (inluding defining each participant’s project;shooting;editing sessions;creating a coherent body of work;creation of a slide show;projection of the images of the participants.)
-a welcome and farewell dinner
-lunch everyday and snacks during the afternoon
-24 hour help from the 1000 Words team and an assistant/translator with local knowledge.

Participants will be expected to make their own travel arrangements and find accommodation, which in Fez can range from £150 upwards for the week. We can advise on finding the accommodation that best suits you. Remember that most of your time will be spent either at the riad or shooting. For photographers using film we will provide the means for processing and a scanner. Photographers shooting digital will be expected to bring all necessary equipment. Please note that for the purposes and practicalities of a workshop, digital really is advisable. All participants should also bring a laptop if they have one. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual technical needs.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

We require that you send 10 images as low res jpegs and/or a link to your website, as well as a short biography and statement about why you think it will be relevant for you to work with Erik (approx 200 words total). Submissions are to be sent to [email protected] with the following subject header: SUBMISSION FOR 1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH ERIK KESSELS.

30 June 2011: Deadline for applications
15 July 2011: Successful candidates contacted
29 July 2011: Deposit due (£350)
31 August 2011: Second instalment due (£900)
11 September 2011: Arrive in Morocco for welcoming dinner
12 September 2011: Workshop begins
17 September 2011: Workshop ends

Succes gewenst!