Tag Archives: Tibet

A Year of Photographers in the Picture

A little shy of a year agowith the world’s attention focused on a change of power in North Koreaa photo of Kim Jung Il’s funeral, released by KCNA (North Korean Central News Agency), sparked controversy. The image had been manipulatedless for overt political ends, more for visual harmony. Blog Submission . The photo’s offending elements, photoshopped from the image, were not political adversaries or top secret information, but a group of photographers who had disturbed the aesthetic order of the highly orchestrated and meticulously planned occasion.


Dec. 28, 2011. A limousine carrying a portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il leads his funeral procession in Pyongyang.

In an age where seemingly every occasion is documented through photography from every conceivable anglean estimated 380 billion photographs will be taken this year aloneit’s not only North Korean bureaucrats who are wrestling to keep hoards of other photographers out of their pictures.

Photographers frequently appear in news photographs made by others. Banks of cameras greet celebrities and public figures at every event; cell phones held high by admirers become a tribute in lights, but a distraction to the viewer. Amateurs and professionals, alike, appear in backgrounds and in foregrounds of images made at both orchestrated events and in more candid moments. squido lense . The once-invisible professional photographer’s process has been laid bare.

On occasion, photographers even purposefully make their fellow photographers the subject of their pictures. The most difficult picture to take, it seems, is one without the presence of another photographer either explicitly or implicitly in the frame.

Everyone wants to record their own version of realityironically, it turns out, because by distracting oneself with a camera, it’s easy to miss the true experience of a moment. At a recent Jack White concert, the guitarist requested that audience members stop trying to take their own photos. “The bigger idea,” his label noted in a statement, “is for people to experience the event with their own eyes and not watch an entire show through a tiny screen in their hand. We have every show photographed professionally and the pictures are available from Jack White’s website shortly after to download for free.”

The abundance of camera phones and inexpensive digital cameras has changed the photographic landscape in countless and still-incompletely understood ways, and it’s not just the North Korean government trying to find ways around the hoards of photographers making their way into everyone else’s shots. Here, TIME looks back on the past year to highlight an increasingly common phenomenon: the photographer in the picture.

Pictures of the Week: March 23 – March 30

From student protests in Jakarta and Tibetan self-immolations in India to Pope Benedict XVI’s Cuba visit and fires in Colorado, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week, October 28 – November 4

From the G20 Summit protests and Kabul’s suicide bombings to escalating violence in Gaza and religious pilgrimages, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

See last week’s Pictures of the Week

Photographer #409: Shinya Arimoto

Shinya Arimoto, 1971, Japan, is a conceptual documentary photographer who studied at the School of Visual Arts in Osaka. Within his body of work there is a lot of street photography containing images of structures, objects, women and homeless people. In contrast to a lot of other street photographers he does not just snap his camera but carefully creates the images showing a photographer who communicates with his subjects. The world he shows us is chaotic and vibrant yet he manages to create a sense of calm within his photographs. His story-telling images are well-composed, sensitive and intimate. His work has been exhibited on numerous occasions in Japan. The Totem Pole Photo Gallery released two limited edition 20 page books with his work. The following images come from the portfolios Ariphoto2011 Vol.1, Ariphoto2009 Vol.3 Why Now Tibet and Ariphoto2009 Vol.1.

Website: www.arimotoshinya.com

Photographer #357: Larry Louie

Larry Louie, 1961, Canada, is a socially engaged documentary photographer who leads a dual career. He runs a optometry clinic in Edmonton where he actively works as an optometrist. Photography had been a serious hobby, but in 2005 he started showing his images and traveling the world. Since then he has been to countries as Tanzania, Tibet, Bangladesh and Turkey. Since 2008 he found a way to combine the photography with his work in eyecare. He worked together with Seva Canada, an organization whose mission is the elimination of preventable and treatable blindness around the world. In his series entitled In the Underbelly of Kathmandu, Larry focused on the simmering crisis currently happening in the Kathmandu Valley. It is quickly becoming the slum central of Nepal with raw sewage and air pollution as a result. Larry won numerous awards including the IPA Lucie Award and the National Geographic Photo Essay award. The following images come from the series Touched by Seva, A Working Day in Dhaka, Bangladesh and In the Underbelly of Kathmandu.

Website: www.larrylouie.com

Hamish Fulton – Walking Artist

Geronimo Homeland, 2006. Hamish Fulton

Kailash Kora, walking one circuit of the pilgrimage route round mount kailash Tibet 5 + 6 2007, Hamish Fulton

Hamish Fulton Installation View at Hausler Contemporary. 'Water from the Mountains' (Zürich) Nov 17, 2007 – Jan 26, 2008

From The Tate:

Since the early 1970s Hamish Fulton (born 1946) has been labelled as a sculptor, photographer, Conceptual artist and Land artist. Fulton, however, characterises himself as a ‘walking artist’.

Fulton first came to prominence in the late 1960s as one of a number of artists – including Richard Long and Gilbert & George – who were exploring new forms of sculpture and landscape art. A central characteristic of their practice was a direct physical engagement with landscape. Fulton’s time as a student at St Martin’s College of Art in London (1966-68) and his journeys in South Dakota and Montana in 1969, encouraged him to think that art could be ‘how you view life’, and not tied necessarily to the production of objects. He began to make short walks, and then to make photographic works about the experience of walking.

At this time, and subsequently, his practice was influenced by an unusually broad set of interests including the subject of the environment and the culture of American Indians. In 1973, having walked 1,022 miles in 47 days from Duncansby Head (near John O’Groats) to Lands End, Fulton decided to ‘only make art resulting from the experience of individual walks.’ Since then the act of walking has remained central to Fulton’s practice. He has stated ‘If I do not walk, I cannot make a work of art’ and has summed up this way of thinking in the simple statement of intent: ‘no walk, no work’. Although only Fulton experiences the walk itself, the texts and photographs he presents in exhibitions and books allow us to engage with his experience.

I just took a wander around Fulton’s site. Check it out HERE