Tag Archives: Thesis Project

A Photographic Scavenger Hunt: Conversation with John Cyr

John Cyr is a Brooklyn-based photographer, master printer, and a graduate from SVA’s Photography MFA program. He began the Developer Tray series as his thesis project and has spent nearly two years shooting photographers’ developing trays all around the US. I spoke to John now that his project is nearing completion.

Picture 1 of 10

Mark Cohen’s Developer Tray. Photograph by John Cyr.

Paula Kupfer: Have you finished the project? And did you photograph sixty trays as you set out to do?

John Cyr: I’m definitely in the final stages, and past the sixty—I’m at sixty-five now. I have only a few more appointments set up. I’m very comfortable where the collection is. Now I’m figuring out how to take it into book form, and how much of the personal experience to include.

PK: It’s a fascinating part of the project.

JC: I get that a lot. People’s interest is piqued when they find out, for instance, that I went to Sally Mann’s farm and actually photographed the tray there.

PK: In this context, the photograph is the result of a long process, and there’s some mystery to it. Did you meet many of the photographers?

JC: There are a few that I never met, where l just dealt with their assistants. Others were mailed to me. But for at least eighty percent, I visited in person. Some were ten-minute talks; others, two-hour conversations. For instance, I had a great day with Larry Fink. I spent the day out on his farm, and stayed for dinner. He had peacocks running around, and an emu.

PK: You weren’t tempted to photograph the periphery—their houses or surroundings, or the photographers themselves?

JC: I only photographed with my cellphone. With every photographer that I approached, I made sure to be overly humble and gracious. I think that a lot of the reasons that well-known photographers accepted to participate was because it wasn’t so personal. Photographically, maybe. But I didn’t say, “I’d love to take a portrait of you while I’m there.”

I wanted to respect their privacy and not be aggressive. But I regret not recording anything while I was there, especially now, as I’m going back and trying to put the pieces together. I have notes, which are good, and I have my memory, but there’s a lot that’s lost in time.

PK: Do you consider this a greater reflection of the project? It deals with nostalgia and the past, and something that’s being lost…

JC: Yeah, that’s interesting, and a good way of putting it. This is what I’m trying to bring together for the book – the experience, the fleeting moments, the experience of going and meeting with these photographers.

PK: Do you think of the project as an archive?

JC: I do. And, as far as the archive goes, it almost heightens the fact that each of these objects is so physically beautiful—because of the colors, but also because it’s a picture of this object that has literally experienced the hands of the artist.

Personally, this project has the greatest sense of purpose within the history of photography, and the current state that we’re in. Not necessarily for representing a longing for silver printing, because it hasn’t disappeared, but just shifting from being almost the standard to being almost nonexistent.

PK: How do you relate this project to the rest of your work?

JC: I’m trying to figure that out. I’m interested in continuing to work on the idea of analogue photography. This project deals with the analogue process but they’re not analogue prints. I really want to get back into the darkroom with my own work. How it’s going to manifest itself, I don’t know yet.

I’m still happy about my previous, documentary work, but it was difficult to separate myself out from other work that people do at any given place/time. I think that this project has taken off so well because of its iconic imagery. If you see one tray, you remember the project. How I can possibly bring that to another body of work, I’m still figuring out. I don’t want to find myself falling into a trap of doing just that—isolating an object in the same way, showcasing it for the sake of its own personal history. I could go photograph typewriters of well-known writers, or recording instrument of old analog studios—it’s never-ending. But I don’t want to do that. I know that this was a shift from my previous work, and where it will go next, I don’t know yet. But it’s going to be different.

To learn more about John Cyr’s work, visit his website www.johncyrphotography.com.

Paula Kupfer is the editorial and circulation coordinator for Aperture magazine.


Blood Ties: A Photographer Captures Gang Culture In Her Family

The first time Lourdes Jeannette entered her uncle’s house as an adult, she held a camera. For many years she refused to visit her mother’s brother – a man who is the leader of the Piru West Tampa Bloods. She disapproved of his activity and chose to ignore that aspect of her family’s life. But when her two younger brothers started hanging around with his crew, she knew she had to pay closer attention.

Still when she first flew down to Tampa to photograph some members of her uncle’s set of the Bloods, she had no intention of putting her family at the center of her study. In fact, much of Jeannette’s career seems like it could be seen as, if not accidental, guided by intuition and circumstance. After several years working as a manager of an interior design firm, she knew she needed a dramatic change. A friend praised her casual phone camera shots and suggested she pursue something in the arts. She decided to study photography in earnest, gaining a spot at the International Center for Photography’s general studies program. When it came time to select her thesis project, Jeannette soon turned toward gang culture. In retrospect, she wonders if she wanted to understand it better, herself: What was this phenomenon that gripped so many members of her family?

She found a young member of her uncle’s crew who was willing to be trailed and photographed — and to whom she was not related — but when he got cold feet, Jeannette decided to persevere with the project. Asking her uncle’s permission to hang around and shoot was tense, but she says that her desire to truly understand the motivation for her uncle’s gang involvement trumped her nerves.

“He truly saw it as a matter of protection for his family,” she explains. The two now enjoy a close relationship. Likewise, spending so much time with her two brothers has changed the dynamic of their relationship. “They aren’t just my kid brothers anymore,” she says. “They’re working with me, and I rely on them.”

Soon, Jeannette was spending weeks at a time shadowing events like ‘jumping in’ ceremonies or trailing the gang members to parties, nightclubs and business transactions. She became a regular at “The Trap” — a house where gang members relax, unmolested by the demands of families and day jobs. Before she knew it, she was a fixture of the organization with unfettered access.

The relationship strengthening was an important part of the project, but Jeannette saw an artistic progression that was just as profound. “I can see my improvement over the months — getting more comfortable getting close, putting myself in the middle of things,” she says, pointing to an intimate portrait of a young female cousin getting ready for a party with friends in her bedroom. In making her family the subject of her portrait, Jeannette not only grew closer to them, she also found her artistic vision.

The project is by no means over. Jeanette will continue documenting the culture, especially now that she has formed relationships with several female members of the gang. She hopes to deepen her understanding of gang culture through the experience of the women who marry, join or are born into the crew.

Lourdes Jeannette is a New York based photographer. She managed an interior design company before pursuing a career in photography at the International Center of Photography. See more of her work here.

Meredith Melnick is a reporter at TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeredithCM

Beyond Yale: Another View of New Haven

In her work, Elaine Stocki is a bit of a shape shifter. It’s hard to know by looking at the images, for example, if they come from a man or a woman. The perspective of the photographer is raceless, classless – even ageless. Stocki believes that this vagueness is central to her work: she endeavors to explore people without regard to their identities and in mixed groups. She prefers strangers to whom she can develop an intimacy from scratch.

“I like working with groups of people – groups of bodies because there’s an unexpected element to it,” she says, adding that she favors those who aren’t self-conscious doing odd things for the camera in public places. “And I don’t photograph people who I don’t like personally.”

Her vision has paid off this year in the form of a Grange Prize nomination—the prestigious Canadian public-voted major art award with a $50,000 prize—for her graduate school thesis project, Balcony. Stocki was one of four finalists, two of whom are mid-career artists. She’s still young and just a couple of years out of Yale’s MFA program. But her seemingly effortless complex compositions and intimate character studies have been earning her critical acclaim since her undergraduate days.

Growing up in Winnipeg, Man., Stocki was often photographed by her father, who was the designated family photographer and favored medium-format images taken with a Hasselblad. But it wasn’t until she was halfway through a Bachelors’ degree in chemistry at the University of Manitoba that she realized how much she needed an artistic outlet. Soon after, she settled on photography.

Armed with an undergraduate degree in photography, Stocki moved from her hometown to New Haven, Conn. But New Haven was more confusing than she anticipated.

“I felt like a fish out of water, even though my work was supported,” she says of her time at school in the disjointed city, which couples a modest local economy and a bit of urban decay with the wealthy bubble of the Yale campus. “I think for grad students with working class backgrounds, it’s a bit surreal to be thrown into this world of extreme privilege and to be told that you belong to this community. It didn’t feel true.”

In those first few months, Stocki experienced a wide range of emotions, including some anger and frustration over the disconnect between community and school. It was in this period that she met William, a man who was known around campus for occasionally panhandling. Stocki asked William to model for her and the rest is history: the two grew close and Stocki was able to meet his live-in girlfriend, family and friends. Theirs was a two-year relationship built on friendship and on a stunning collection of work.

While the school continued to feel foreign to her, the surrounding town reminded her of Winnipeg: a working class population in a town with a great deal of open and forgotten space. She found it easy to move around the city, using its landscape as her backdrop without worrying about interference. Walking around outside Yale’s reach, she found small areas that caught her eye: porches, a rock wall. She’d bring William or one of her other subjects to that space—alone or in a group—and begin to set up one of the layered scenes for which she is known and admired.

Just don’t make it about her personal identity or the differences between her and her subjects. “For me it’s about creating a dialogue that is inclusive and not focused on race or class,” she says. “These people felt like my community.”

Elaine Stocki is a Brooklyn-based photographer. See more about her series here.

Meredith Melnick is a reporter at TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeredithCM

Thesis Orals Update (On Success and Failure)

This past Saturday, I spent 20-30 minutes in front of a panel of three SVA faculty members discussing my thesis project. The work I presented was part photography book, part audio-video piece. I intended for the photography book to convey ideas that the audio-video piece (on a dvd inserted into the book) would then contradict. The oral defense was much tougher than I had imagined and I was much more nervous going into the defense than I had thought I would be. The 48 hours waiting to receive the decision were nerve-racking. I had defended the work to the best of my ability. I’ve talked about my work many times before in various settings but never in such an intense fashion.

Monday afternoon I received a letter from the department which included the following:

You have now engaged the first step of your thesis defense the orals. The department believes that this is an event that is designed to prepare you for future defenses of your work as a creative image-maker. Please know that while this may have been an arduous and trying process, it is one that has been conducted with your greatest interest at heart and with a remarkable objectivity and knowledge of a dedicated and caring faculty.

The faculty wholeheartedly believes in you and your ambitions. Indeed, we are moved by your decision to engage a whole new perspective on your traditional photographic talents. This was a bold move. The panel did, however, note a few issues, which they feel could be better addressed to a second panel on April 22nd. They feel that in addressing the following concerns, you will bring this project to maturity. classic . They are sure that by doing this you will be on a positive track to complete for this semester. You should understand that this will be a new panel of faculty, who are kindly disposed to helping you in every way. You should not see this negatively in the least. We feel that the ideas presented in your work are complex and can be better represented with a little more work. Use this opportunity to better connect the various aspects of your project.

Please consider the following:

  • The images were well done, with a clear idea and sense of subject, but did not represent the ideas presented in the paper. The paper needs to better present your intention, but also serve as a provocative counterpart to these beautiful and seductive images.
  • There was concern about the audio aspect of your project. It seemed disconnected from the piece, and was too radio. Those ideas may be better expressed as text.
  • The disconnect between the pictorial qualities of the photographs and the ultimate political considerations needs to become a more cogent experience for the audience. How do you get them to put those things together in an experience of the work that leaves them questioning the conditions of our environment?

The time before the second presentation should be used to address issues raised by the committee, to discuss your project with your advisor, thesis faculty and myself, and to work out the inconsistencies that are in question. Your fullest engagement in your thesis in these remaining weeks should allow you to successfully complete your final presentation and proceed accordingly.


My initial reactions were of frustration, anger and disappointment. I put a lot of time, energy and thought into my project and I felt I held my ground in the oral defense. As I heard from other classmates about who had to represent and who didn’t, I was only more frustrated. 16 students in our class of about 40 were asked to represent. Some students who I thought had wonderful work had to represent. And if I’m being honest, I was surprised too by a few students who were not asked to represent. I felt the process was totally subjective. What if I had presented to one of the five other panels? What if I had presented after a different student? What if I had presented first? Or last? What if…

Well…the thing is, the panel was right. After talking to classmates and faculty and some heavy introspection, I realized that the panel had been objective and considered my work within the context that I had presented it. Given that context and my claimed intention, the project was flawed.

Maybe a different panel would have passed the project, but that would have been my loss.The realizations that I’ve had as a result of the oral defense and being asked to represent have been some of the most profound that I have had in the two amazing years I’ve spent in the MFA program.

Click here to view the embedded video.

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Thesis Orals Update (On Success and Failure)

This past Saturday, I spent 20-30 minutes in front of a panel of three SVA faculty members discussing my thesis project. The work I presented was part photography book, part audio-video piece. car repair san antonio . I intended for the photography book to convey ideas that the audio-video piece (on a dvd inserted into the book) would then contradict. The oral defense was much tougher than I had imagined and I was much more nervous going into the defense than I had thought I would be. The 48 hours waiting to receive the decision were nerve-racking. I had defended the work to the best of my ability. I’ve talked about my work many times before in various settings but never in such an intense fashion.

Monday afternoon I received a letter from the department which included the following:

You have now engaged the first step of your thesis defense the orals. The department believes that this is an event that is designed to prepare you for future defenses of your work as a creative image-maker. Please know that while this may have been an arduous and trying process, it is one that has been conducted with your greatest interest at heart and with a remarkable objectivity and knowledge of a dedicated and caring faculty.

The faculty wholeheartedly believes in you and your ambitions. Indeed, we are moved by your decision to engage a whole new perspective on your traditional photographic talents. This was a bold move. The panel did, however, note a few issues, which they feel could be better addressed to a second panel on April 22nd. They feel that in addressing the following concerns, you will bring this project to maturity. They are sure that by doing this you will be on a positive track to complete for this semester. You should understand that this will be a new panel of faculty, who are kindly disposed to helping you in every way. You should not see this negatively in the least. We feel that the ideas presented in your work are complex and can be better represented with a little more work. Use this opportunity to better connect the various aspects of your project.

Please consider the following:

  • The images were well done, with a clear idea and sense of subject, but did not represent the ideas presented in the paper. The paper needs to better present your intention, but also serve as a provocative counterpart to these beautiful and seductive images.
  • There was concern about the audio aspect of your project. It seemed disconnected from the piece, and was too radio. Those ideas may be better expressed as text.
  • The disconnect between the pictorial qualities of the photographs and the ultimate political considerations needs to become a more cogent experience for the audience. How do you get them to put those things together in an experience of the work that leaves them questioning the conditions of our environment?

The time before the second presentation should be used to address issues raised by the committee, to discuss your project with your advisor, thesis faculty and myself, and to work out the inconsistencies that are in question. Your fullest engagement in your thesis in these remaining weeks should allow you to successfully complete your final presentation and proceed accordingly.


My initial reactions were of frustration, anger and disappointment. I put a lot of time, energy and thought into my project and I felt I held my ground in the oral defense. As I heard from other classmates about who had to represent and who didn’t, I was only more frustrated. 16 students in our class of about 40 were asked to represent. Some students who I thought had wonderful work had to represent. And if I’m being honest, I was surprised too by a few students who were not asked to represent. I felt the process was totally subjective. What if I had presented to one of the five other panels? What if I had presented after a different student? What if I had presented first? Or last? What if…

Well…the thing is, the panel was right. After talking to classmates and faculty and some heavy introspection, I realized that the panel had been objective and considered my work within the context that I had presented it. Given that context and my claimed intention, the project was flawed.

Maybe a different panel would have passed the project, but that would have been my loss.The realizations that I’ve had as a result of the oral defense and being asked to represent have been some of the most profound that I have had in the two amazing years I’ve spent in the MFA program.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Share/Save

What Is An MFA Thesis?

Victoria Hely-Hutchinson

The below is taken from the SVA Photo, Video and Related Media Department information packet on the MFA thesis process. The second year of the program is heavily focused on the process so I thought I ought share what it’s all about.

What is a Thesis?

The thesis project is the main and most significant aspect of your masters year work. The thesis project is a creative endeavor and an original investigation of a specific viewpoint. Because the MFA degree is a terminal degree in this field, it is expected that the project be at the highest level of visual artistic work. It must be a cohesive body of work. It must bear up to the scrutiny of the creative community, and further our understanding of its specific investigation.

The project follows as a result of the candidates thesis proposal as a unique body of artwork, demonstrating the capacity to push the limits of what is possible in the multi-faceted realms of the visual arts. It will be understood and evaluated within the terms that you yourself define. This definition comes from your written proposal as well as your thesis statement (which are due in mid- November and mid-March respectively). They are meant to direct and define the goals and terms, which render your work significant.

The main component of the thesis is a body of work completed by the student during the spring semester that employs photographic, video, film, computer- generated images, or related practices. Accompanying this portfolio is a supporting paper that documents and assesses the development of that work.

An independent committee of three faculty members will evaluate the finished project through a process called Thesis Orals. The student will supply their paper to the committee prior to the student presenting their project in front of the committee. While subjectivity is inherent in such judgments, be assured that the committee’s demand for quality will be unbending. Any student who does not receive a passing grade for thesis will not be eligible for degree conferral.

Preparation

Together, a portfolio, thesis proposal and thesis paper reflect an academic year’s worth of intensive exploration and accomplishment. The spring semester of your second year will be an intense period during which creative work and production develops into a cohesive whole. Plasma TVs . This process begins long before the spring semester in the summer of your first year at the latest. Before beginning of the fall semester of your thesis year, you should already be examining your work critically, considering what creative direction you might be heading into and where you are aiming to be in six months. Discuss your work and ideas with the Chairperson, your peers, critique instructors, and your other sources of creative inspiration. Get your creative juices flowing and focus your thinking into a raw concept for your project. Remember that it is always best to set realistic goals for the size and scope of the project based on your personal funds, necessary equipment, and other resources.

Fall Semester

Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is a carefully thought out plan for your masters thesis project, and will be due during the week of November 15th. (If you are planning on working with video in your thesis project, you must commit to video by October 2nd, 2010). Your proposal should state the medium and general format of your intended thesis project, to be completed during the spring semester. It should reflect the research and consideration you have given to the formulation of your project, the projects central idea(s), as well as the specific means you intend to utilize in order to synthesize or realize these ideas within the proposed format. This proposal should show an awareness of the historical and cultural context in which your work is situated as well as its influences, and personal or social factors that bear upon its significance in a larger cultural milieu.

All thesis proposals must be written in proper English and should be copy edited for spelling and punctuation. Your thesis proposal should function as a strategy or game plan that facilitates, directs, and focuses the body of your project. It is meant to serve as a plan for you and your faculty, as well as a reference for understanding the ideas, goals, and intentions of your project. A preliminary visual representation of your work is required with the thesis proposal. You may also include visual references of others work if beneficial to the overall understanding and concept, however this is not required.

Spring Semester

Students entering their thesis project semester (typically spring of 2nd year) must also have completed all required coursework, have a B+ average to date (3.3 GPA), no outstanding incomplete grades, and no student account “holds” for failure to meet financial obligations.

Thesis Paper

The thesis paper is a supporting document and should not eclipse the artwork. Nonetheless, an MFA degree requires verbal and written evidence of both intelligent, creative decision-making, and an awareness of the historical and contemporary context of the work.

Your thesis statement (paper), which will accompany your thesis project, should state the form (medium/format) of your thesis project, as well as the main idea or ideas that you have explored. It should locate your work within a historical and cultural context and state the reasons, personal or social, for addressing these concerns. It is expected that your thesis project will make a contribution to the culture it addresses. It should, therefore, place itself within a larger sense of the world and your personal concerns should be articulated with an awareness of their historical position. This statement need not be long, but it should be clear and focused. This statement will serve as an archive or notation of the project you have completed and should compliment the more extensive analysis you have outlined in your proposal.

Statements should be in clear, concise English and copy edited for grammar, punctuation, and spelling. This statement need not exceed five pages in length. The faculty committee on your Orals panel will have read it and will use it as a guideline to understanding and interpreting your project. Each students final thesis statement will be bound and archived with a record of your project. Visual representations, either photos or diagrams of your work or others, may be incorporated into the paper but are not necessary.

Thesis Oral Presentation

Each candidate will be required to present and orally defend their work in a twenty minute closed session before a committee of three faculty members on Saturday, April 2nd, 2010. As stated previously, your thesis paper will be given to the committee prior to the oral presentation so that the committee will approach your work with an awareness of your ideas.

Share/Save

What Is An MFA Thesis?

Victoria Hely-Hutchinson

The below is taken from the SVA Photo, Video and Related Media Department information packet on the MFA thesis process. The second year of the program is heavily focused on the process so I thought I ought share what it’s all about.

What is a Thesis?

The thesis project is the main and most significant aspect of your masters year work. The thesis project is a creative endeavor and an original investigation of a specific viewpoint. Because the MFA degree is a terminal degree in this field, it is expected that the project be at the highest level of visual artistic work. It must be a cohesive body of work. It must bear up to the scrutiny of the creative community, and further our understanding of its specific investigation.

The project follows as a result of the candidates thesis proposal as a unique body of artwork, demonstrating the capacity to push the limits of what is possible in the multi-faceted realms of the visual arts. It will be understood and evaluated within the terms that you yourself define. This definition comes from your written proposal as well as your thesis statement (which are due in mid- November and mid-March respectively). They are meant to direct and define the goals and terms, which render your work significant.

The main component of the thesis is a body of work completed by the student during the spring semester that employs photographic, video, film, computer- generated images, or related practices. Accompanying this portfolio is a supporting paper that documents and assesses the development of that work.

An independent committee of three faculty members will evaluate the finished project through a process called Thesis Orals. The student will supply their paper to the committee prior to the student presenting their project in front of the committee. While subjectivity is inherent in such judgments, be assured that the committee’s demand for quality will be unbending. Any student who does not receive a passing grade for thesis will not be eligible for degree conferral.

Preparation

Together, a portfolio, thesis proposal and thesis paper reflect an academic year’s worth of intensive exploration and accomplishment. The spring semester of your second year will be an intense period during which creative work and production develops into a cohesive whole. This process begins long before the spring semester in the summer of your first year at the latest. Before beginning of the fall semester of your thesis year, you should already be examining your work critically, considering what creative direction you might be heading into and where you are aiming to be in six months. Discuss your work and ideas with the Chairperson, your peers, critique instructors, and your other sources of creative inspiration. Get your creative juices flowing and focus your thinking into a raw concept for your project. Remember that it is always best to set realistic goals for the size and scope of the project based on your personal funds, necessary equipment, and other resources.

Fall Semester

Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is a carefully thought out plan for your masters thesis project, and will be due during the week of November 15th. (If you are planning on working with video in your thesis project, you must commit to video by October 2nd, 2010). Your proposal should state the medium and general format of your intended thesis project, to be completed during the spring semester. It should reflect the research and consideration you have given to the formulation of your project, the projects central idea(s), as well as the specific means you intend to utilize in order to synthesize or realize these ideas within the proposed format. This proposal should show an awareness of the historical and cultural context in which your work is situated as well as its influences, and personal or social factors that bear upon its significance in a larger cultural milieu.

All thesis proposals must be written in proper English and should be copy edited for spelling and punctuation. Your thesis proposal should function as a strategy or game plan that facilitates, directs, and focuses the body of your project. It is meant to serve as a plan for you and your faculty, as well as a reference for understanding the ideas, goals, and intentions of your project. A preliminary visual representation of your work is required with the thesis proposal. You may also include visual references of others work if beneficial to the overall understanding and concept, however this is not required.

Spring Semester

Students entering their thesis project semester (typically spring of 2nd year) must also have completed all required coursework, have a B+ average to date (3.3 GPA), no outstanding incomplete grades, and no student account “holds” for failure to meet financial obligations.

Thesis Paper

The thesis paper is a supporting document and should not eclipse the artwork. Nonetheless, an MFA degree requires verbal and written evidence of both intelligent, creative decision-making, and an awareness of the historical and contemporary context of the work.

Your thesis statement (paper), which will accompany your thesis project, should state the form (medium/format) of your thesis project, as well as the main idea or ideas that you have explored. It should locate your work within a historical and cultural context and state the reasons, personal or social, for addressing these concerns. It is expected that your thesis project will make a contribution to the culture it addresses. It should, therefore, place itself within a larger sense of the world and your personal concerns should be articulated with an awareness of their historical position. This statement need not be long, but it should be clear and focused. This statement will serve as an archive or notation of the project you have completed and should compliment the more extensive analysis you have outlined in your proposal.

Statements should be in clear, concise English and copy edited for grammar, punctuation, and spelling. couples counseling . This statement need not exceed five pages in length. The faculty committee on your Orals panel will have read it and will use it as a guideline to understanding and interpreting your project. Each students final thesis statement will be bound and archived with a record of your project. Visual representations, either photos or diagrams of your work or others, may be incorporated into the paper but are not necessary.

Thesis Oral Presentation

Each candidate will be required to present and orally defend their work in a twenty minute closed session before a committee of three faculty members on Saturday, April 2nd, 2010. As stated previously, your thesis paper will be given to the committee prior to the oral presentation so that the committee will approach your work with an awareness of your ideas.

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