Tag Archives: Tenth Anniversary

The Mohawk Ironworkers: Rebuilding the Iconic Skyline of New York

For more than a century, ironworkers descended from the Mohawk Indians of Quebec have helped create New York City’s iconic skyline, guiding ribbons of metal into the steel skeletons that form the backbone of the city. In the tradition of their fathers and grandfathers, a new generation of Mohawk iron workers now descend upon the World Trade Center site, helping shape the most distinct feature of Lower Manhattan—the same iconic structure their fathers and grandfathers helped erect 40 years ago and later dismantled after it was destroyed in 2001.

Driving some 360 miles south to New York from the Kahnawake reserve near Quebec, these men work—just as their fathers did—in the city during the week and spend time with their families on the weekends.

One year ago, around the tenth anniversary of the September 11th attacks, photographer Melissa Cacciola began documenting some of these workers—not an easy task given that the roughly 200 Mohawks (of more than 2,000 iron workers on site) are working at a frantic pace, helping One World Trade Center to rise a floor a week.

Cacciola, a photographer with a background in chemistry and historic preservation, is one of few photographers who work exclusively with tintypes, images recorded by a large-format camera on sheets of tin coated with photosensitive chemicals. Having previously photographed members of the armed-forces for her War and Peace series, Cacciola looked to document those continuing to help the city move past the shadow of tragedy.

“It seemed like a real New York thing,” she told TIME. “And it made sense as the next chapter in the post-9/11 landscape. Rebuilding is part of that story.”

Just as towers like the Empire State Building and Rockefeller Center mark the height of America’s skyscraper architecture, tintype photographs are inherently American. Tintype developed in the 1850s as early American photographers looked for alternatives to the expensive and finicky glass-plate processes popular in Europe. Recycled tin was a readily available resource in the new nation—less than 100 years old—and so the tintype grew in popularity, earning its place in American photographic identity. Even Abraham Lincoln’s campaign pins contained an inlaid tintype portrait of the candidate.

“You don’t find tintypes on other continents,” Cacciola said.

Slightly blurry and sepia-toned, Cacciola’s portraits feel timeless, save for the occasional modern stickers on her subjects’ hardhats. Each portrait focuses tightly on the men’s strong facial features.

The 30 tintypes in the series are each made from bulk sheets of tin, although Cacciola has also used recycled biscuit jars in prior tintype projects. Coated first with a black lacquer and then a layer of collodion emulsion to make them light sensitive, the plates are dipped in a silver bath immediately before exposure to form silver iodide—a step that bonds actual particles of silver to the emulsion. Nothing could be more fitting for men working with steel to be photographed on metal.

In the tradition of 19th-century photography, Cacciola’s process is slower than today’s digital systems. But the finished plates are more than simple portraits; rather, they hold their own weight as tangible objects. Just as histories often reflect the blemishes of times past, Cacciola’s tintypes are fragile, containing marks and slight imperfect artifacts that reflect the medium’s limitations. Working by hand rather than machine, each portrait records the artist’s intentions as much as her subject’s.

“These tintypes are so much a part of me,” she says. “Like the fact that you get partial fingerprints or artifacts from the way I’m pouring collodion on the plate—it’s all human. The way silver and light interact in this chemical reaction is a testament to the Mohawk iron workers and this early [photographic] process—it’s unparalleled in terms of portraiture.”

Melissa Cacciola is a New York-based tintype photographer.

Lynsey Addario’s Return to the American Road

The night before the tenth anniversary of September 11, I flew out to San Antonio to begin a three-week road trip across America with TIME columnist Joe Klein, from Laredo, Texas up to Des Moines, Iowa.

In the seat next to me, a beautiful woman sat caring for her quadriplegic son, who was sitting in the adjacent row with her daughter. Susan Bradley and her daughter were tender and attentive with Matt in a way that made me think his injuries were new. I, shooting my first assignment in the U.S. after 11 years of covering conflict in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Congo, Darfur, Lebanon, Somalia and Libya, assumed he was injured at war. Matt was 24, the age of so many young, American men I have spent years with on military embeds in Afghanistan, documenting the war unfolding over the years and witnessing heavy combat and brutal injuries.

As it turns out, Matt had nothing to do with Afghanistan. Like almost everyone Joe and I would meet on the road trip, the war rested on the periphery of their lives, and their primary concerns were here at home. Matt, a football player in college, and the son of a professional football player, had been rafting in Sacramento, California, when he stepped in to rescue a woman being abused by her boyfriend. As Matt walked away, the man allegedly followed him with a mag-light, and beat him on the back of the neck with the heavy flashlight, causing spinal cord injuries that left him paralyzed.

I don’t know why that moment stuck with me. I just immediately connect everything to the wars I have been covering overseas, and that’s not the case back home. I wrongly assumed all Americans at home were as consumed with our troops in Afghanistan as I was abroad.

Over the last decade, I have come to know details about most Afghan warlords, the infinite humanitarian crises across Africa, statistics of maternal mortality rates of women around the world, but I’ve become a stranger in my own country, unfamiliar with the pertinent issues at home and with what Americans are thinking the year before another presidential election. I generally don’t follow domestic news that much aside from how it relates to the stories I’m covering abroad, like what Americans think of the War in Afghanistan.

In three weeks of extensive interviews and casual conversations, I don’t remember a single person, except for veteran Anthony Smith, who was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq, bringing up the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, without being prompted by a pointed question. Almost everyone spoke about the economy, healthcare and unemployment. People are polarized. Some are angry, and many say they are disillusioned with President Obama.

Working with Joe was quite an honor—for me, it was like a free education of politics in America. I sat in a lot of his interviews and asked him a lot of questions. Of course, I felt incredibly ignorant, because so often they were questions I should known the answers to—about politics in the States, who was running, what their platforms were. But I honestly hadn’t been following them that closely because I’ve been gone.

In fact, I’ve been gone so long that it took a while to familiarize myself with what the scenes were of the story in each city, and what the reoccurring topics of discussion were. Once I did that, I felt like I needed more time to go back and actually shoot because we moved so quickly. The pace of traveling to one city a day made it difficult for me to figure out what there was to shoot. It’s not like there was a specific protest or news event going on. It was just the city, or a gas station, or a diner, so I had to really talk to people and find out where I need to be as a photographer.

Overall though, it was really nice to be home. It was nice to be in my own country, where I didn’t need a translator or a driver. Where I didn’t need to figure out cultural references or what hijab I needed to wear to cover my hair. Americans are really lovely people—friendly, kind and willing to help you out. For me, it was incredibly humbling to come back and spend three weeks just talking to Americans all across the country and listening to what they had to stay.

Lynsey Addario is a regular contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

Read Joe Klein’s cover story from the Oct. 24, 2011 issue of TIME [available to subscribers] here.

Thursday 13 October 2011

Features and Essays

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of the war in Afghanistan..

Most of you have probably already seen this…nevertheless….LightBox put up a gallery of 43 images by war photographers in Afghanistan and the images that moved them most….Lot of familiar frames by Anderson, Morris, Sinclair, Bronstein, Haviv, Murphy, van Agtmael, Nachtwey, etc…. you name it…Hadn’t seen this one by Emilio Morenatti before…

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP. Afghanistan. October 4, 2004.

TIME Lightbox: Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (LightBox) Includes Michael Kamber  commenting on a  Tim Hetherington photo and Pancho Bernasconi commenting on a Chris Hondros photo

Just noticed Patrick Witty tweet that this week’s TIME International cover story is on Afghanistan..Cover photo by Adam Ferguson…My eyes were drawn to the headline that accompanies the image… “Why The US Will Never Save Afghanistan”…you compare that to the famous 2010 cover with Jodi Bieber’s Aisha portrait with the headline “What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan”,and I would argue there’s been a change in Afghanistan thinking at TIME’s editorial desk…see the covers side-by-side here.

Panos have a slideshow of Afghanistan images from the past ten years… Was looking at the below Martin Adler one from Kabul in 2002, and noticed the building looked familiar… realised it’s the same one as in a famous Simon Norfolk one from 2001… See the two side-by-side here

Photo: Martin Adler/Panos. Afghanistan. Kabul. 2002.

Panos Pictures (various photographers): 10 Years of War in Afghanistan (Panos)

Donovan Wylie: Capturing the Architecture of War Before It’s Gone (Lightbox)

Nice series on Lightbox by Gillian Laub from a Tel Aviv beach..Was surprised to see the credit didn’t mention Institute… Checked her website…Looks she’s no longer represented by them…

Gillian Laub: Tel Aviv Beach (TIME Lightbox)

Occupy Wall Street…

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Yunghi Kim: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Photographer’s website)

Life.com: Occupy Wall Street (Life) Photos by various photographers

Larry Fink: Occupy Wall Street in 1967 (New Yorker)

From Newsweek…First Donald Weber’s photos from Japan… See later in this post for info on Weber’s grant writing workshop…

Donald Weber: Japan: Life After Zero Hour (Newsweek) Fukushima

Lynsey Addario: Famine in Africa’s Horn (Newsweek)

Rafal Milach: Life in Putin’s Russia (Newsweek)

More Russia… this by new VII member Davide Monteleone…

Davide Monteleone: Russian Soul (Phaidon)

Tomas Munita: Chilean Miners (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos)

Lauren Greenfield: Child Beauty Queens (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: Boom to Bust in Ireland (Institute)

Peter diCampo: Ivory Coast (VII Magazine)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Cinemas (MSNBC)

Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers (TIME LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Kenya (Starved for Attention)

Damir Sagolj: Hunger in North Korea (NYT Lens)

Peter Beste: Norwegian Black Metal (New Yorker)

Robin Hammond: Condemned (Panos)

Seamus Murphy: Libya (VII)

Tom Hyde: After The Fall (Statement Images)

Richard Nicholson: The Last Of London’s Darkrooms (NPR)

Giorgos Moutafis: The Arab Spring Project (Foto8) Moutafis’ website 

Xavier Comas: The House of the Raja (LightBox)

Elliott Erwitt: Sequentially, Yours (Magnum)

Matt Bowditch: Afghan Blueys (Lightbox)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff Nights (M – Le Monde magazine)

Daniel Lilley: The Isle of Vindelis (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks

Don McCullin (CNN)

VII photographers Kashi, Pagetti, Bleasdale, Kratochvil interviewed (Canon Digital Learning Center)

Finbarr O’Reilly (Reuters Photo blog)

It appears Martin Parr has ditched the Nintendo.. Looks like he’s doing his thang with 5D kit and a Gary Fong diffuser in this video…

Martin Parr (YouTube) “Magnum photographer Martin Parr was asked by FotoFreo Festival Director Bob Hewitt to photograph three Western Australian port cities, Fremantle, Broome and Port Hedland.”

Paolo Woods (YouTube)

Davide Monteleone (BJP)

Free Sunday evening? Check this out…

Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

BagNewsSalon webinar discussing the visual framing of “The Great Recession” in the United States and Europe : Date: Sunday October 16th : Time: 10 am PST/1 pm EST/6pm GMT (running for 90 minutes) : Where:  Open-i platform, hosted by the London School of Communications, via live audio : Facebook RSVP here.

Mirjana Vrbaski (Conscientious)

Laura El-Tantawi (Emphas.is)

Jake Price (Verve)

Sergey Chilikov (BJP)

Articles 

Guardian’s monthly recommendations on exhibitions and books…

photo: Bruce Davidson  .. Was fiddling Davidson’s book last weekend…Stunning photos..

Guardian: The Month in Photography

More on the Davidson work…

Guardian: Bruce Davidson’s subway photography takes us to New York’s heart

New Yorker: New Photography at MOMA

BBC: Injured photographer Giles Duley wants Afghanistan return

Magnum Photos have some found Libyan Secret Service photos in their archive…David Campbell raised the issue should they be for sale like any other Magnum photo… Read the debate below…I saw some of the photos printed in the Guardian in July…Credited to Magnum Photos…pic of the spread here (had it on my iPhone)..I don’t know did Guardian have to pay Magnum for this set to be published…

David Campbell: The Libyan Secret Service photo archive – questions for Magnum Photos (DC Storify)

David Campbell: The problem with the dramatic staging of photojournalism: what is the real issue? (DC website)

Telegraph: Diane Arbus, in her own words (TelePhoto)

Telegraph: An Emergency in Slow Motion: The Inner Life of Diane Arbus by William Todd Schultz: review (Telegraph)

NYT Lens: Bringing Turkish Photography to the World Stage

PDN: Steve Jobs: Visionary, Inventor, and Very Challenging Photo Subject (PDN)

Reasons Why Professional Photographers Cannot Work for Free (Professional Photographers)

Nick Turpin: Distrify: A new model for distribution? (photographer’s blog)

Time: Joel Sternfeld: A Modern Master’s First Pictures (Time Lightbox)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets – Production

Wayne Ford: We English: Simon Roberts extensive survey of the English at leisure (Wayne Ford Posterous)

BJP: Noor Images adds Andrea Bruce and Giancarlo Ceraudo as new members

No Caption Needed: Review of Errol Morris, Believing is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography) (New York: Penguin, 2011) (No Caption Needed)

Joanna Hurley: Notes on the Artist Statement (Hurley Media)

A Photo Editor: Why Does Everyone Think They Need A Photo Book? (APE) Joerg Colberg’s thoughts on the matter

Granta: Remembering Tim Hetherington

PDN Photo of the Day: Marcus Bleasdale: Early Morning Prayers (PDN)

NYT Lens: Jack Delano’s American Sonata

Gizmodo: Photoshop Will End Blurry Pics Forever

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Manu Brabo

Guardian: Featured photojournalist Ahmad Masood

The Independent: Out with the new: Turbine Hall’s latest work is tribute to old movies (Independent) | slide show (Guardian)  On a slightly different note, I was at Tate Modern over the weekend and saw their shop is selling Martin Parr Autoportrait ceramic plates for £65.. Fancy one? Take a look

Verve Photo: Diana Markosian (Verve)

Verve Photo: Katie Orlinsky (Verve)

Wired: Back to Basics: Analog Photography Project Aims to Slow Things Down

Adam Marelli: An in-depth look at Henri Cartier-Bresson’s composition style (adammarelliphoto.com)

Magnum Photos: Advice to young photographers (PDF)

Telegraph: National Gallery announces first major photography exhibition

PDN: Who Photographers Follow On Tumblr

Crowd funding

Condemned by Robin Hammond (Emphas.is)

Land of Hope and Dreams by Amnon Gutman (Kickstarter)

BTC oil pipeline by Amanda Rivkin (Empas.is)

Agencies and Collectives

Aletheia Newsletter

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

More awards for Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev Wins 2 Prix Bayeux-Calvados Awards for Libya Coverage (PDN) Same news on BJP

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 Call for Submissions

Reminders…

Applications for the Tim Hetherington Grant are due 15 Oct. 

Time LightBox Next Generation Competition

NatGeo Photo Contest

IdeasTap Photographic Award: Finalists

Workshops

Grant Writing with Donald Weber : NYC Nov 17, 2011 : DC Nov 19, 2011

Duckrabbit three-day photo film workshops in London (30 Nov-2 Dec) and Birmingham (7-9 Dec)

Jobs

Brighton Photo Fringe is seeking a new Director

Events

BJP Vision 2011

multiMedia and Photo Communities

Foam Talent issue : Issuu

1000 Words : new issue

Contacts Editions

F8Magazine

52 by 52 : “A weekly photo challenge is set by fifty-two accomplished photographers throughout the course of a year”

Photographers

Reuters photographer, Finbarr O’Reilly, who shot the World Photo of the Year 2005,  has a website now…

Finbarr O’Reilly

Carlos Javier Ortiz

Paul Jeffrey

Sean Hawkey

To finish off… Seen it before, but was a giggle to bump into this again… The Life of Photographer

Tuesday 13 September 2011

Features and Essays

Tenth anniversary of the 9/11 is now passed us, but let’s start with some of the features related to it…Lot of good coverage on the New York Times’ web pages, obviously…First, Eugene Richards’ multimedia of his Stepping Through Ashes…

Eugene Richards: Stepping Through Ashes (NYT Lens: September 2011)

NYT Magazine slideshow ‘Images from a Post 9/11 World’..includes various photographers’ work… Benjamin Lowy, Lynsey Addario,Peter van Agtmael, Ashley Gilbertson, and others… also links to the articles, which their images originally illustrated…

After 9/11, National Guard and police patrols had become part of the commute at Grand Central Terminal. Security was increased further after the Madrid bombings. Related article: “Lesser Evils.”  photo: Antonin Kratochvil/VII

New York Times Magazine: Ten Years’ Time: Images from a Post 9/11 World (NYT Magazine: September 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson has some new work on the New York Times site also…

Ashley Gilbertson: Remembering Lost Loved Ones (NYT: September 2011)

Todd Heisler: The Moment Before, and After (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

Fred. R. Conrad: The Faces of a Towering Project (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Magnum: 9/11 and Aftermath (Magnum in Motion: September 2011)

Susan Meiselas: Ground Zero Artifacts and Construction (Magnum: September 2011)

Scott Goldsmith: Flight 93 and Shanksville, PA: The Forgotten Part of 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

To other features…

Sanjit Das: East Africa Crisis (Panos: September 2011)

New work by last year’s Canon AFJ winner Bacigalupo, whose exhibition ‘My Name is Filda Adoch’ impressed a lot of people at Visa…

Martina Bacigalupo: Mogadishu, Somalia (Agence Vu: September 2011)

Patrick Brown: Bengal’s Burden (Panos: September 2011)

Espen Rasmussen’s In Transit project has now a dedicated website…

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (Project website: 2011)

Afghanistan…

Hipstas by Zalmai on Lens blog…

Zalmai: In Afghanistan, ‘Unbelievable Force of Life’ (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Norfolk on New Yorker Photo Booth…

Simon Norfolk: Postcard from Afghanistan : Echoes of Wars Past (New Yorker: September 2011)

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan: Preparing for disaster in south Punjab (Guardian: September 2011)

Mitch Dobrowner: The Storms (TIME Lightbox: September 2011)

Have another look at Medecins Sans Frontieres’ and VII Photo’s Starved for Attention campaign online… There’s a travelling exhibit going around the States this autumn…

photo: Marcus Bleasdale

MSF and VII Photo: Starved for Attention 

Andrea Bruce: Conservative Muslims in Russia (Washington Post: September 2011)

Christian Als: The Disappeared Generation (Panos: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Detained Sub-Saharan Africans in Libya (Magnum: September 2011)

Foreign Policy  have a three-part series online featuring Kate Brooks‘ work from Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and Libya…The photos are taken from her new book

Kate Brooks: What War Looks Like (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: Those Who Face Death (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: From Revolution to War (FP: September 2011)

Johannes Eisele: The Casualties of War: Afghanistan’s Medevac Missions, Up Close (TIME LB: September 2011)

Stanley Greene: A Drop of Blood between Turkey and Syria (NOOR: 2011)

Kozyrev’s Tripoli photos now also on the NOOR site…

Yuri Kozyrev: The Battle for Tripoli (NOOR: September 2011)

Ruben Reyes: Foreign Laborers in Dubai (NYT Lens: September 2011) Reys’ website

Japan…

William Daniels and Espen Rasmussen: Six Months On (Panos: September 2011) Japan

Jake Price: Japan six months after tsunami (BBC: September 2011)

Ed Kashi: Eye Contact (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (TIME LB: August 2011)

Edward Keating: Blue Highway (TIME LB: September 2011)

Anthony Suau: The 99ers (TIME: September 2011) Long-term unemployed in America

Mauricio Lima: Few Treatment Options for Afghans as Drug Use Rises (NYT: August 2011)

Jean Gaumy: Climate challenge : The Indonesian case (Magnum: September 2011)

David Trattles: Girl Boxers of Calcutta (Foto8: September 2011) Trattles’ website

Jessica Earnshaw: At a Bronx Hospital, a Teenage Milestone (NYT Lens: September 2011) Earnshaw’s website

Interviews

First some 9/11 anniversary related interviews…

Robert Clark : 9/11 (burn magazine: September 2011)

Lynsey Addario : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Samantha Appleton : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Joel Meyerowitz : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Meyerowitz interview also on TIME… looks like he’s working with Leica S2 here…

Joel Meyerowitz : Ground Zero, Then and Now (TIME: September 2011)

Eric Hoepker : 9/11 (CNN: September 2011) CNN’s Errol Barnett speak to photographer Thomas Hoepker who took one of the most controversial 9/11 images

Steve McCurry on 9/11…

Steve McCurry :  memories of 9/11 (Phaidon: September 2011)

Interesting thing I noticed the other day looking at some of McCurry’s 9/11 photos on his blog was that he has a frame almost exactly like one of Nachtwey’s… The two men must have stood pretty much side-by-side…The colours are different, but I presume it’s because Nachtwey was shooting C-41 and McCurry E-6…It’s fascinating how similarly the two photographers framed the scene…

Marco Grob : on the Making of Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience (TIME LB: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Leica blog: September 2011)

Steve McCurry : Revealed – the true story behind the ‘Afghan Mona Lisa’ (Phaidon: September 2011)

Olivier Laurent’s excellent Yuri Kozyrev interview in British Journal of Photography…

Must read. Yuri Kozyrev : on covering revolutions in the Middle East (BJP: September 2011)

Kozyrev interview also on Lighbox…this about one of his Iraq War photos, one the most memorable and powerful images of the entire conflict by anyone I’d say…Couldn’t help but notice the file has been re-processed…

Yuri Kozyrev The Aftermath of 9/11: Ali Abbas (TIME LB: September 2011)

Fred Ritchin : Ritchin letter regarding the Q&A (Wired Raw File: September 2011)

Broomberg and Chanarin (ph-research.co.uk: 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam part 2 (Nikon blog: September 2011)

David Chancellor talks about ‘Hunters” (Polka: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Outposts (National Media Museum Vimeo: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Ways of Looking (National Media Museum: Vimeo 2011)

Martin Parr : Parrworld (Phaidon: 2011)

Nadav Kander (Conscientious: 2011)

Mario Tama : 9/11 (Dallas News: September 2011)

Jodi Bieber : Capturing Aisha (Montreal Mirror: September 2011)

Catalina Martin-Chico (BJP: August 2011)

Tyler Hicks : Gaddafi Family Album (NYT Lens: August 2011)

JR (The Atlantic: 2011)

Jared Soares (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (thoughtsonphotography: September 2011)

Articles

9/11 related articles… I particularly enjoyed reading and looking at this one from TIME Lightbox…

photo: Jonathan Torgovnik

TIME Lightbox: 9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (TIME LB: September 2011)

How magazines picked their 9/11 anniversary covers…

NYT: Magazine Covers on a Topic Known All Too Well (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

NPR: Sept. 11 Through The Eyes Of VII, Magnum And Life (NPR: September 2011)

Guardian: 9/11 anniversary: photographers recall day of horror (Guardian: September 2011)

New York Times: The Reckoning: America and the World a Decade After 9/11 (NYT: September 2011

Thomas Hoepker: I Took That 9/11 Photo (Slate: 2006) Photographer Thomas Hoepker on Frank Rich’s column, and why he thought his picture was too “confusing” to publish in 2001.

David Campbell: September 11, 2001: Imaging the real, struggling for meaning (DC blog: September 2011)

Alan Chin: Pushpins on a calendar (BagNewsNotes: September 2011)

Chris Floyd: The 9/11 Patriotic American Road Trip (Photographer’s Blog: September 2011)

Peta Pixel: How Photographers’ Rights Have Eroded Since September 11th (Peta Pixel: 2011)

Other articles…

photo: David Alan Harvey

Ideas Tap: Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 2 (Ideas Tap: September 2011)

UK Photographer’s Rights (Amateur Photographer: September 2011)

The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books…includes a shout-out to Luc Delahaye at Tate Modern..only three prints on show though (installation shot I took with my phone when I visited the show in August)…I enjoyed them…

Jenin Refugee Camp, 2001. Luc Delahaye.  From the exhibition New Documentary Forms at Tate Modern, London…worth a visit also for Mitch Epstein’s American Power…not so keen on the other three…

The Observer: The Month in Photography September 2011

NY Daily News: To honor slain photojournalist Tim Hetherington, fellow photog opens docu-film gallery in Bronx (NY Daily News: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images: Tom Stoddart shoots the ICRC  ’Health Care in Danger’ campaign

Photo Stories: Webdoc Favourites (photo-stories-org: 2011)

BJP: Photographers’ Gallery delays reopening until 2012

BJP: Photojournalism award launched in tribute to fallen photographer Lucas Dolega

BJP: Guillaume Herbaut and Bruno Masi win the Web Documentary Award at Visa Pour l’Image

Magnum: Steve McCurry Wins First Leica Hall Of Fame Award  (Magnum: 2011)

New Statesman:  The ambiguous art of Taryn Simon (New Statesman: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Oded Balilty (Guardian: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Freedman (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Verve: Pete Marovich (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Pete Kiehart: Once: A New Magazine Model (Photo Brigade: September 2011)

BJP: Fujifilm commits to instant photography (BJP: September 2011)

Agency Access: Agency Access Acquires ADBASE and FoundFolios to Become Most Robust Photo Marketing and Illustrator Marketing Resource

10 Famous Street Photography Quotes You Must Know (Erik Kim Photography blog: September 2011)

Pulitzer-winning photojournalist resigns rather than lay off staff

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

UNICEF Pictures of the Year Award 2011 (link to PDF)

Five finalists for the inaugural Reminders Project Asian Photographers Grant

Tracy Baran Award : $5000 grant for an emerging US female photographer

Congrats to all this year’s Foam Magazine Talents…

photo: Ivor Prickett

Foam Magazine Talents 2011

Royal Photographic Society : Annual Awards 2011

Guardian Student Media Awards shortlisted

Click About It

Books

Kate Brooks: In The Light Of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11

Conversations with Photographers (Conscientious)

Out November 1…

VII: Questions Without Answers 

Ken Jarecke: Husker Game Day – Farewell Big 12 

burn 02

The Family by Jocelyn Bain Hogg

Crowd Funding

Laura El-Tantawy just launched an Emphas.is crowd funding campaign to help her continue her work in Egypt…go and have a look…

Laura El-Tantawy: In the Shadow of the Pyramids (Emphas.is)

Agencies

VII September 2011 newsletter

Shell Shock Pictures

24Productions

Events

British Journal of Photography : ‘From stills to moving images’ at The Social on Monday 26 September, at Barrio Central, Poland Street, London W1F 8PS

Exhibitions

“If I don’t photograph it, it won’t become known.” Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus : At War : Berlin : 10 September – 4 December 2011

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters  : Host Gallery : 3 November – 17 November 2011 : press release

Photographers

Pamela Chen

Robert Nickelsberg

Patrick Smith

Diana Markosian

Conor O’Leary

Magda Rakita

Videos

Danfung Dennis’ film Hell and Back Again opening in US theaters on Oct 5…

Hell and Back Again Trailer

C.J Chivers, Andre Liohn: Lethal Lessons in Misurata (NYT: 2011)

Aperture education Youtube channel

Workshops

Magnum Photos workshop Munich, 10-14 Oct with Pellegrin, Dworzak & Anderson

Jobs

Open Society Institute : Exhibition Coordinator

Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University

To finish off…

I was reading Finnish magazine Kuukausiliite this morning which had an article about Google Street View along with some photos by artist Jon Rafman… Noticed one of the images was similar to one by Mishka Henner…Looks like Henner and Rafman have used the same Google Street View frame for these two…

René Clement

Last year, I featured the work of René Clement, a Dutch photographer who had stumbled upon a community in Iowa that felt like home. He created a wonderful body of work about the community highlighting the people and places of the Dutch settlement of Pella, Iowa. René went on to create a book of this work through a Kickstarter campaign and I am happy to announce the publication of his book, Promising Land.

To order a book, e-mail René directly: [email protected] or visit his site.

René has a new Kickstarter campaign for a project that I feel strongly about, especially because I am married to a New Yorker and spent many years in NYC myself. René has been documenting Ground Zero ever since witnessing the horror and devastion of 9/11.

My goal is to publish a one-time newspaper entitled Scar Tissue covering significant developments in New York and at Ground Zero during the yearpreceding the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 tragedy. This represents an important chapter in the history of New York City.


In August 2010, I started a year-long journey as a New York based photographer, to create a pictorial study of my home town as it continues to recover from the 9/11 tragedy ten years on. I wanted to feel the pulse of the city to determine if its wounds remain open, have healed or if scar tissue has formed.

The past year has been filled with highly charged events in the run-up to the tenth anniversary, with controversy surrounding the possible location of an Islamic Center near Ground Zero, in addition to the death of Osama Bin Laden. The redevelopment of Ground Zero is now well underway, after laying dormant for many years; a gaping hole in the city’s fabric is being mended, and new towers begin to emerge once again.

9/11 was a terrible day; I witnessed it myself up close. After turning on the television and watching the second plane hit the tower, I jumped in the subway from the Upper East Side of Manhattan and headed south to the World Trade Center. Midway to my destination, the power went out. After waiting in a dark subway train for an hour, I exited my carriage and walked along the tracks until I reached the 23rd Street station, where I climbed up to street level. I continued my walk south to WTC from there.

As I drew near WTC, I could no longer see the two towers which had once been so prominent in Manhattan’s skyline; a firefighter told me that they had collapsed. I approached the site and stood by the smoldering and burning remains. One thought filled my head, if a place called hell existed, it would have been right there, right then in that moment. I walked down streets lined with burning cars.

I saw a businessman, standing there, lost, in shock, white shirt soaked with blood, bandaged head. I saw a firefighter on a stretcher, unconscious, having succumbed to smoke. A thick dust cloud from the fallen towers lingered in the streets, and mixed with smoke from the fires were making me nauseous. People shouting, screaming. A policeman grabbing me, dragging me down the street yelling, “No pictures you fucker!”

I know that I carry scar tissue, painful memories that may always remain with me, buried only in a shallow grave. Even now, almost ten years later, if I see a plane disappearing behind a tall building, I still hold my breath, and then exhale with relief when it reappears and continues along its route. Although I didn’t lose family or friends, on that day I lost part of my innocence, my belief that this world could exist in peace.

On the tenth anniversary this September, we will once again mourn the past, the loss of loved ones, friends and strangers. Since this is such an important milestone, I believe that a more comprehensive review should be made in New York. The events of 9/11 opened up a global Pandora’s Box; the war efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq, homeland security issues in the U.S.A., religious tensions throughout the world.

Here in New York, issues relating to the building of an Islamic Center near Ground Zero revealed to us that raw emotions are still bubbling just below the surface. While many affected people resumed their daily lives, first responders are still dying in great numbers from the toxic dust they inhaled while working at Ground Zero.

Ten years later, it is now time for all of us to look collectively in the mirror and attempt to understand how far we have come in our healing process. We must also look more closely at individuals whose lives were changed dramatically to see how they continue to cope now. I feel that my project will contribute a more in-depth and broad discussion of these issues.

My project will be published as a newspaper entitled Scar Tissue. It will be handed out free of charge in lower Manhattan on September 11th 2011. I am working with journalist Bas den Hond, correspondent for the Dutch newspaper Trouw on this project. Scar Tissue will contain a series of pictures, interviews and stories.

In addition, we are currently in negotiations with certain newspapers and magazines, to have Scar Tissue included as a supplement, so that our message can reach as many readers as possible. Depending upon the success of these negotiations, Scar Tissue may not only be released in English, but also in Dutch.

What’s next?

Coinciding with FOAM‘s tenth anniversary is a forward-looking micro-site: What’s Next. The site a selection of articles and reflections by some of the most interesting minds in photography today, covering everything from the future of the institution to the effects of digital media on photography.

The good people at FOAM say: “The question ‘What’s Next?’ is founded in our conviction that photography has fundamentally changed during the last twenty years. And this process of change and transition might not be finished yet. The digitalization of the medium has altered every aspect of photography, whether it is the photograph as an object, the position of the professional photographer, the function of the photo lab, the news agency or the photography museum.

In fact the question ‘What’s Next?’ is about far more than ‘just’ the future of photography. It is also about the future of a society dictated by visual media, of a society in which people primarily communicate with technological tools that have been developed and made into consumer products with incredible speed. It is about the future of a society in which every layman can and will be a photographer, sharing his experiences with newly made online communities, a society in which the experience of time and space have drastically changed.”

In conjunction with the website FOAM recently held a fascinating symposium, a few video clips of which you can see here:

To see more videos like this from FOAM click here