Tag Archives: Tennessee State University

Joshua Dudley Greer, Parkton

Joshua Dudley Greer, Parkton

Joshua Dudley Greer

Parkton,
Maryland, 2005
From the Somewhere Along the Line series
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Summer Re Runs: Kevin Thrasher

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with Kevin Thrasher.

Kevin Thrasher’s images have a wonderful combination of unsettling charm. He has a knack of finding moments and locations that while normal and natural, also leave room for alternate interpretations. Born in Birmingham, Alabama and now living in Richmond, Virginia, Kevin received his BFA from East Tennessee State University and his MFA from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. He had a long list of exhibitions in 2010 including the forthcoming Collectors Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation in NYC.

Photography seemed like the only option that I wanted to pursue in school. I wish there were a more glamorous way to talk about the choices that led me to photography, but photography was the only thing that I ever thought I really wanted to do over a lifetime. Photography made sense. Making photographs is a way for me to go out into familiar or unfamiliar places and discover things. I like going out and getting lost in a new place and making pictures there. The world is an awfully interesting place and you can make work where ever you are.

His series, Common Ground, looks at how we interact with the natural world, and the series Brown’s Island is a work in with similar themes but focusing on a specific place.

There is no pristine landscape. There is only the land that we have. We got to nature or other more socially controlled spaces to enjoy ourselves. Recreation takes us from our own backyards, to other places where we can connect with nature or experience moments of leisure.

The photographs exist in between accepted ideas of landscape and these newer more controlled spaces. People are making the best of the spaces that they have access to. Many of the locales often sustain the idea of community where people are drawn together for mutual purpose. We have come to accept these interstitial spaces as our nature.

Images from Brown’s Island

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer

Imperial Sand Dunes,
California, 2011
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer, Imperial Sand Dunes

Joshua Dudley Greer

Imperial Sand Dunes,
California, 2011
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer received his BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. His photographs have appeared in The Collector's Guide to New Art Photography Volume 2, Flash Forward 2010, Smithsonian Magazine and Photographer's Forum. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission and in 2012 was named one of the New Superstars of Southern Art by Oxford American. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Joshua Dudley Greer, Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A

Joshua Dudley Greer, Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A

Joshua Dudley Greer

Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A ,
Point Pleasant, West Virginia, 2011
From the Point Pleasant series
Website – JDudleyGreer.com

Joshua Dudley Greer was born in Hazelton, Pennsylvania. He received his BFA in Photography from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002 and his MFA, with distinction, from the University of Georgia in 2009. Joshua's work has been featured in publications such as Smithsonian Magazine, Photographer's Forum Magazine and Flash Forward 2010. He has received grants from the Maryland State Arts Council and was a Critical Mass finalist in 2011. He is currently living in Johnson City, Tennessee where he is a visiting assistant professor of photography at East Tennessee State University.

Matt Brown

When I was a kid, we had a wonderful family dog that my dad insisted live outside the house. She was allowed in the kitchen, but never into the rest of the house, and we would delight in her inching into the dining room when she could. My father had grown up on a ranch and he wasn’t one to anthropomorphize animals, so I always found it fascinating that our dog loved him the best. Tennessee photographer Matt Brown has a new project, Dogwater Blues, where he takes a look at the outside dog, in particular, the lives of dogs, their homes, and their families in rural Appalachia.

Matt was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and attended East Tennessee State University where he studied English and Photography. He found the two areas of study a good match for his love of the narrative and detail in the world of language could also be reflected in his visual expression. He was drawn to the work of filmmakers like Krzysztof Kieślowski and Terrence Malick and the places they would put the camera and how they composed and saw light, and it helped him see through his own lens. He now lives in Asheville, North Carolina and works as a filmmaker and photographer–each filling the two sides of his artistic personality,”like the difference between writing poetry and prose. My favorite photographs force you to pore over their details in the same way you’d pore over the word choice in a poem by D.H. Lawrence or Ellen Bryant Voigt.”

One thing I would never photograph is a dog lying in the mud.” – Diane Arbus

Dogwater Blues: I began photographing the dogs and doghouses of upper East Tennessee and the rural South in the pursuit of understanding the lives of those that choose to make their homes in Appalachia. I found myself drawn again and again to these animals: their candid stares, the ramshackle and wholly unique homes their owners would cobble together from tin and scrap wood, and how each animal made themselves known.

My goal was never to anthropomorphize, or to give a “voice” to these animals. But while looking closely at these dogs in the context of their rustic surroundings, it’s hard for them not to stand-in for their human counterparts. Surrounded by junk and their tumbledown homes, a sense of desperation can be read in their direct gazes, their howls, and the scratches left in the side of a home. This sense of desperation and sadness led me to photograph these dogs to see what was reflected there, in each of them.

I soon found that animals could tell me more about the people that own them than any personal portrait could. “Dogwater Blues” became a project about trying to understand how we—as humans, as stewards, as protectors—treat the things we love.