Tag Archives: Tate Modern

Photo News – Hotshoe magazine for contemporary photography Dec/Jan out now in print and as app

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Featuring: Leigh Ledare testing the boundaries of relationships, sex and love in Double Bind; Alinka Echeverria’s documentary on the birth of South Sudan; Diana Scherer‘s Nurture Studies; Asger Carlsen‘s Hester; and Fleur van Dodewaard in Crude Metaphors. Plus reviews of Alec Soth‘s Looking for Love, 1996, Klein + Moriyama at Tate Modern, and the Nikon D800. As well as, A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York, a round up of the latest books, exhibition listings, news and more.

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Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Alec Soth, Alinka Echeverria, Asger Carlsen, Diana Scherer, Hotshoe App, Hotshoe App Edition, HotShoe magazine, Leigh Ledare

Daido Moriyama printing show @Tate Modern, London

Our Associate editor, Brad Feuerhelm on the rare opportunity to create his own limited-edition, photo book with legendary Japanese photographer, Daido Moriyama.

I was lucky enough to get to the Tate Modern last week to take part in making a book with Daido Moriyama along with a bevy of other photography aficionados. The idea of the printing show has been successfully resurrected by curator, writer and Goliga Press head Ivan Vartanian for the Tate’s current show Klein + Moriyama, which in itself is a great behemoth of a dual retrospective.

Mr. Vartanian has taken his cue from the original printing show that Moriyama did in New York City in 1974 wherein he notoriously and, in perfect participatory harmony, assembled a small workshop in the commercial gallery and invited interested parties to become part of the performance of book arts selection. Members were allowed to pick an amount of Moriyama’s images to collate into their own book. A highly probable gesture to the unique and collaboration bereft of the pressures of commerce normally associated with a commercial gallery endeavour. This seemed to be a kind of citizen artist project with a nod to the happenings of the 60’s. Collaborative. Inspirational. Effective. 

On the sixth floor of the Tate Modern with its expansive views over a lovely sunny London, participants were asked to repeat the process whereby they are allowed to pick through a pre-selected amount of Moriyama’s works to collate and produce their own book on the spot with other members allotted the same time. It was a hubbub of friendly, weekend activity with museum curators milling about with the public and of the photographic enthusiasts on the same level, the level of artist. The sort of open experience is one of the many reasons the London photographic community has been greatly enabled by the Tate’s push towards photography under the tutelage of Simon Baker, chief in staff of bringing photography howling down on London, the beast tamed and now sharply in the spotlight.

Before entering the sanctity of the Tate, I had already decided to reduce my knowledge of Daido Moriyama into one image and to repeat it over and over, making a repetitive, yet completely unique object barring any other paraphoto nerds had not beat me to it in 1974 at the original staging or at the recent Tokyo happening. At $40,000 for an original copy of the 1974 book, I think I will decline to pursue its possibility. In selecting an image of lips, I felt that I selected an iconic summation of the desire in Moriyama’s work. My ultimate choice would have been the ‘stray dog’ image, which I can still envision as a single image book.

Moriyama, ever the provocateur, was clever to exclude ‘stray dog’ and the famous tights image for his pre-selection of works available in the book making process. I remember chuckling on the way in when I realised it was not there, knowing he had got the best of me under his controlled and fairly so, tyrannical application of what we could choose. The images on display were gorgeous and the second-guessing about making it a more straightforward book still swayed to repetition and the single idea/image.

After selecting your images on a card (all cleverly organised), you give the selection to a printing assistant who then goes through the process of stapling the images to a pre-made screen printed cover of which there are two choices to pick from. I went blue. The title… Menu

I waited while my book was assembled to have my number called out to retrieve it from Simon Baker. My Menu served, a deserved light chuckle from him at its insistence to be different and I was sent off to wonder in the big smoke for the rest of my Sunday, feeling that the experience was well worth the obscenely cheap £20 ticket. Whether I felt I collaborated or parasitically stole myself into a vain collaboration with Mr. Moriyama is another matter entirely!

Brad Feuerhelm

William Klein + Daido Moriyama: Double Feature

William Klein’s urgent, radical, gritty, blurred and out of focus photographs are as dynamic and visceral as any the medium has produced. His revolutionary magnus opus ‘Life is Good & Good For You in New York’ is an uncompromising, groundbreaking portrait of urban life, which at the time of its publication in 1956 not only shocked the established order, but reinvented the photographic document and is now widely regarded as one of photography’s greatest and most influential works.

Daido Moriyama is the most celebrated photographer to emerge from the Japanese ‘Provoke’ movement. His grainy high contrast black-and-white photographs, focused on the urban environment of post-war Tokyo’s Shinjuku district, echo those of Klein’s New York. Like Klein, Moriyama has consistently revisited, reinvented and reworked his photographs within a process of constant flux.

The Tate Modern’s latest exhibition ‘William Klein + Daido Moriyama‘ brings together the work of the two photographers as a double feature—side by side retrospectives of photographers whose work is inextricably linked but independently minded. 

Following Matisse, Picasso; Albers, Maholy-Nagy; Rodchenko and Popova, the show is the latest in a program of double headers at the Tate Modern that explore two artists and how their work relates to one another. 

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art, spoke with TIME about the exhibition—the first full show he has curated since joining Tate Modern.



“It’s a matter of historical record that Klein’s book on New York and then his book on Tokyo were massively influential in Japan, and so the idea of the show exploring both influence and affinity, things that [Klein and Moriyama] have in common beyond the idea of influence, is very important. We are not saying that William was the beginning of all of Moriyama’s ideas, Moriyama was really influenced by Andy Warhol. He was massively influenced by Jack Kerouac and the Beat writers. So he had this series of really interesting dissident American influences of which one of them was William Klein—and we thought this was a good starting point.

Both photographers were really involved in the show’s installations. There are certain places in the show where they had free reign to do what they wanted. William’s response was to make huge blow-ups of his pictures—which realize his constant striving for impact and to make his images as confusing and overwhelming as the cities that they are of.

William Klein

Dakar, school’s out, 1985. Painted contact 1998

Moriyama’s response was to make a huge work called Memory, which is a grid of 1.5 meter wide photographs taken from different points in his career. There are images in there from Provoke, from Farewell Photography, from Japan: a Photo Theater, but there are also things from last year or maybe two years ago. He’s similarly free with his past.

We’ve also tried on the wall to show quite large grids of work so you have the sense of looking at images on the page. We have 70 framed prints from New York—There’s a whole group of children playing like you get in the book. There’s a whole group of shots at night in ballrooms like you get in the book—and also unpublished images from the same series. You get this sense of multiplicity.

We did the same thing with Moriyama. An incredible series of prints of Japan: A Photo Theater—which was his first really important book—are actually cut, mounted as exactly the same pairs that are on the pages of the book. So you’re standing in front of 75 small prints, many of which are like the small pages of the book.

We are not suggesting that the framed works are better than the book, but just that they give you a way into the material in the book, whilst remembering that the book is the really important thing. We’ve tried to keep that balance throughout the show. They think of their work in terms of layouts and sequences and series so we’ve tried to make that a feature of the installation.

Daido Moriyama

Memory of Dog 2, 1982

The show also focuses on what it means to photograph a great city like New York or a great city like Tokyo. And it’s interesting that Klein and Moriyama both photographed each other’s cities. Klein was a New Yorker who photographed New York and then went to Tokyo. Daido initially photographed entirely in Tokyo and then went to New York and did great work there.

Restless is the way to describe Klein’s attitude to his own work. [With Life is Good & Good For You in New York] He knows that he made a great book. And when he talks about it, he talks about wanting to change everything and he talks about blowing things up too big, making everything too grainy. Making the contrast too high. And he talks about that as a very deliberate thing. That he was trying to make a different aesthetic for photography.

Many people regard Robert Frank’s The Americans as the pinnacle of photo book-making, but Frank’s Americans doesn’t have the kind of impact, especially globally as [Life is Good & Good For You in New York]. What Klein’s book did for the way people think about photography in Latin America, in Europe and in Japan is probably unparalleled. And in that sense its greatness is hard to argue with.

But what I also think is really important and what the exhibition really claims is we’re used to thinking of the post-war 60s and 70s in a particular way, often skewed toward America. And for a long time, black-and-white photography, but particularly Japanese black-and-white photography, just wasn’t known here and wasn’t that understood. Provoke was this amazing work being made by a genuine avant-garde with theorists and thinkers and poets and writers. It was a proper thinking, functioning, avant-garde that was happening in Japan. The importance of that is beginning to be understood.

I think in another 10 years or so Moriyama, Takanashi and Nakahira will be as well known and in that moment, as well understood, as Eggleston and Friedlander.

Klein explored photography. He did some of the best photo books ever and moved on [to make films]. He moves in a very restless way, which I think is very interesting. Moriyama has been more consistent. He’s stuck very closely with photography.

The great pleasure for us and the great opportunity for Tate was to work with both of them directly. They’re both really active. Daido is doing amazing work. William’s still making photographs. He’s still interested in working. And for us; in a photography way, it is like getting to work with Matisse and Picasso while they’re still around. They are these great figures and we’re very fortunate to be able to work with them both.”

Simon Baker is the Tate Modern’s Curator of Photography and International Art

The Exhibition William Klein + Daido Moriyama is showing at Tate Modern, London from Oct. 10, 2012 – Jan. 20, 2013

Klein and Moriyama films Directed by Martin Hampton/Produced by Tate Media © TATE 2012

 

William Klein + Daido Moriyama @Tate Modern, London

Fresh from the media view of the hugely anticipated Klein + Moriyama: New York Tokyo Photography Film exhibition, which opens today at the Tate Modern, Rachel Ridge reports back on her findings and brings us a quick q&a with Daido Moriyama. Also, after the drop, are two of latest of Art.sy/Tate Shots videos.

Klein + Moriyama: New York Tokyo Film Photography is the latest in a recent rupture of thoughtfully curated photography coming out of the Tate Modern. And, following the likes of Diane Arbus, Boris Mikhailov and the 2010 show Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and The Camera, it appears to have a penchant for the candid wanderers of the world.  
So here we have two connoisseurs of the street in what is essentially two retrospectives back to back. It begins with American painter, filmmaker, and photographer William Klein (b.1928), and ends with Daido Moriyama, (b.1938). The story goes that a twenty year old Moriyama stumbled upon Klein’s seminal photo book, Life is Good and Good For You in New York, published in 1956, a daringly stark portrait of New York, which would go on to change the way he photographed from then on.
These are men who see the city as a mysterious world, that births a strange kind of existence filled with stark realities, performance, isolation, desires and nervous energy. Both shooting predominantly New York and Tokyo in black and white with a point and shoot, they seem to subsume street photography into their own brand of photographic impressionism. Quick to capture what grabbed them, their images had little time for technical expertise and appear more like throbs of instinctive impulse, that often dissolve into abstraction.
The show literally opens with a bang, with Klein’s film Broadway Light 1958, towering over you in pulsating neon flashes which cut to close ups of garish street signs, ‘Don’t walk’ and ‘Taste it’. Klein explores the city as cinema, a phantasmagoria, lulling us into a waking dream state. His work appears to be an intense investigation into these wheels of control and seduction.

Elsa Maxwell’s Tory ball, Waldorf Hotel, New York, 1955. © William Klein


An interesting paradox is his heavy involvement in the fashion industry, working as a photographer for Vogue in his early career. We see enlarged pictures of models head to toe in designer clothing parading the gritty streets of New York, and a satire of the fashion industry in the film, Who are you Polly Magoo? which plays in a room looping a retrospective of his films. It’s quite hard to believe how he got away with poking fun at fashion, whilst at the same time, changing the face of it forever. In his most creative fashion endeavour he mixes photographs of models with photograms showing them interacting with moving light.
There is an inherent urgency about Klein’s practice that speaks to some kind of post war hysteria; rooms of abstract paintings, photograms, films then back to photography. A man on a manic quest for his own truth and always trying to break down the façade, he even does this with the photograph itself in huge blown up photo laminates of painted contact sheets unveiling the selection process for all to see. Laying things as bare as he can, the American dream seems to shatter slightly every time Klein clicks. The war may have been over but a new one was being waged.
The mania of Klein’s rooms pave the way for Moriyama to adopt a more sensual approach, where Klein is the rampant explorer, Moriyama, ten years his junior, is the flaneur letting his intuition lead.

Memory of Dog 2, 1982. © Daido Moriyama

Moriyama, born in Osaka but later settling in Tokyo, seems to be trying to make sense of these fragmented places, which the city poses. His democracy of vision renders real-artificial, human-animal, subject-photographer, inanimate object-nature all equal, all up for investigation. His photographs are where pre conceptions go to die. The city is merely a plethora of possibilities and he is open to them all. In the series Platform he captures different groups of people waiting for the train. We see a businessman, a granny and a housewife all coexisting on an equal plane, all having a story we can get lost in.
Moriyama’s influence, Jack Kerouac’s On the road, can be seen in the countless open-ended narratives that pour onto the walls in a stream of consciousness. Like Kerouac did with writing, Moriyama pushes the limits of photography – shooting grainy, disjointed compositions, overlapping images and over exposing. Photographs become his own subconscious imprints. In Farewell photography we see how Moriyama like Klein, uses personal expressions and distortion of light to remind us of the façade of the photograph.
The curator, Simon Baker, explains this is “a show about photographic architecture”. Staying true to Klein and Moriyama’s love affair with the photo book, the exhibition utilises this in a visually exciting way. There are vitrines full of books, issues of Japanese vintage publication Provoke. The photographs adorn the walls in grids resembling something of a free flowing book etched out on the wall. This, coupled with mammoth sized images and large-scale films create a constant flux of shapes and forms. 
Ultimately, this exhibition is an opportunity to witness how pioneering both were in breaking from the confines of the photograph to create a visual language where perception can roam freely, in turn, producing images that seem to spring from the dark recesses of our imaginations and fantasies.
Rachel Ridge 
Rachel Ridge: Do you see the relationship between you and William Klein? 

Daido Moriyama: Rather than feeling there’s any particular connection with the artist, I feel very happy and very fortunate to be able to share the same space with him. When I was in my twenties and saw Klein photographs of New York it really inspired me to become a photographer and change the way I took photographs myself.

RR: I read that sometimes you don’t look into the viewfinder when you’re shooting; you let your body take the photograph. How much do you rely on instinct and intuition?

DM: Yes. Intuition is very important and the instinct there. Sometimes if you’re in the town you might be looking one direction and you’ll just feel that there’s something happening over there and so you’ll just turn the camera and take a photo in the other direction and that is pure instinct. 

RR: Can you elaborate on how Jack Kerouac’s On the road has influenced your work?

DM: It’s not as though in every shot I take there is a bit of Jack Kerouac or a bit of Andy Warhol. When I was young I was very influenced by seeing their work or reading their work and that has somehow sunk into my subconscious and so it probably is present in all that I do but I’m not very conscious of it when I’m taking the pictures. I can emphasise with them in how they see the world, your basis stance to what’s around you.

RR: So like an intuitive remembering…

DM: It’s intuitive sometimes when you’re actually taking the photo. It can be intuitive what kind of photo you take but at the same time this basic stance to the world around you that’s the base on what you’re standing, so not quite the same as intuition. Through the lens it might be an instinctive motion to take a photo but the whole of my life and memories are acting through that one motion at that time.

Interviews and Talks | September 2012

Vice are running a great series online called Picture Perfect, interviews with photographers… Here Magnum’s Christopher Anderson…

Christopher Anderson, Picture Perfect (Vice)

Recording of a terrific panel discussion which took place in NYC at Aperture last week…Goes on for an hour, but actually feels short…

Shifting Sands: Conflict Photojournalism and Ethics (doctorswithoutborders.org) “The discussion will consider the responsibilities and consequences, intended and otherwise, of reporting on conflict. Moderated by Stephen Mayes, the panel will include Marcus Bleasdale, Jason Cone, Philip Gourevitch, Thomas Keenan, and Kira Pollack.”

How Photographers Try to Protect Their Subjects From Harm (PDN)

The cost of covering conflicts (BJP)

Interviews with Reuters’ Goran Tomasevic about working in Syria…

Photo © Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Goran Tomasevic, Street Fighting in Aleppo (NYT Lens) | Another interview (NBC News) | Another interview (Reuters)

John Stanmeyer: Instagram – It’s About Communication (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: The rise of Instagram (BJP)

William Klein is going to have a retrospective Tate Modern in London next month… Financial Times magazine interviewed him…

Photo © William Klein

William Klein (FT magazine) ‘As next month’s retrospective at Tate Modern will show, the US-born painter, photographer and film-maker has lived artistic life to the full’

Very straight-talking Q&A with David Bailey…

David Bailey (Esquire)

Aaron Huey, Photographing, and Listening to, the Lakota (NYT Lens)

Photo © Nick Ut

Nick Ut (Leica blog) “Nick Ut: The Amazing Saga And The Image That Helped End The Vietnam War” | video (Leica Vimeo)

R.I.P. Malcolm Browne.

Malcolm Browne , The Story Behind The Burning Monk (Lightbox) | Obituary (Guardian)

Photo © Emilio Morenatti

Emilio Morenatti (Guardian) ‘Emilio Morenatti lost a foot while on assignment in Afghanistan in 2009. A vehicle he and a fellow AP journalist were travelling in was hit by a bomb. Morenatti survived but his colleague was killed. Here he shares his thoughts on covering the recent London Paralympic Games and his career in photojournalism’

Emilio Morenatti (NYT Lens) ‘An Empathetic Eye on the Paralympics’

Steve McCurry tells about his 9/11 photographs…

Photo © Steve McCurry

Steve McCurry, The Ground Zero Photographs (American Photo Magazine)

Steve McCurry (Vogue Italia)

PDN interviewed Tom Stoddart about his 78 Perspectives exhibition that just closed in London…

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Tom Stoddart (PDN)

Tom Stoddart (Youtube)

Christopher Morris talked about his career as part of VII’s recent Visual Journeys seminars…

Still from video © Christopher Morris

Christopher Morris, War, Politics, Fashion (VII Magazine)

Not really an interview… but fits here… Always love to read Dave Burnett’s blog posts…

David Burnett: About Those Film Holders (Photographer’s blog)

David Burnett: A Tyranny of Ones (Photographer’s blog)

Don McCullin on Social Documentary Photography (National Media Museum Vime0)

Peter Turnley is having a retrospective in Paris… Lens blog interviewed him…

Photo © Peter Turnley

Peter Turnley (NYT Lens) ‘Four Decades of Photographing the Human Condition’

Antonio Bolfo (Ted on Youtube)

John Vink (Erik Kim blog) ‘Interview with John Vink, Magnum Photographer on his new “Quest For Land” book available on the iPad’

Terrific interview with Robert Nickelsberg and a gallery of his Afghanistan photographs taken through the years, over at Lens blog….

Photo © Robert Nickelsberg

Robert Nickelsberg, A Long View of Afghanistan’s Wars (NYT Lens)

Giles Duley (NBC News) “‘I’m myself again’: Photographer Giles Duley returns to work after Afghanistan blast” | Another interview (Guardian)

Paolo Marchetti, The rise of fascism in Europe (BJP)

Zed Nelson (Hackney Citizen)

NYT Lens posted an interview with some of the NOOR members to coincide with the agency’s five year anniversary…

Photo © Alixandra Fazzina

NOOR, A Collective Eye on Social Justice (NYT Lens)

Martin Schoeller’s and Matthew Modine’s Experiences (Capture on Youtube)

Graciela Iturbide‘s best photograph: a Mexican Seri woman (Guardian)

Yet another brilliant interview by Photo Raw… This time it’s with Barbara Davidson…

Barbara Davidson (Photo Raw)

Seamus Murphy, Poetry in Motion (VII Magazine)

Jessica Dimmock, Facts and Fictions (VII Magazine)

Venetia Dearden, My Life, My Style (VII Magazine)

Misha Friedman (LA Times)

Anton Kusters (BBC World Service Outlook program) ‘Belgian photographer who documented the lives of a Japanese Yakuza crime syndicate’

Olivier Laurent interviewed Getty Reportage’s Sebastian Liste, who has come a long way in just over two years…. In Perpignan, he picked up the City of Perpignan Remi Ochlik Award and a Getty Editorial Grant….

Photo © Sebastian Liste

Sebastian Liste, From the Ian Parry Scholarship to Reportage by Getty Images (BJP)

Stefano De Luigi (Emaho Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz, Taking My Time (YouTube)

Justin Jin interviewed about his project that got exhibited at this year’s Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Justin Jin

Justin Jin, The Zone of Absolute Discomfort (BJP)

Tracey Shelton (DSLR News Shooter) ‘Death in Syria – how Globalpost’s Tracey Shelton captured her extraordinary images’

The New Economics of Photojournalism: The Death of Once Magazine (BJP) ‘The magazine’s editor, John Knight, tells BJP what went wrong’

Corbis Images’ Ken Johnston, Protecting an iconic image (Reuters blog)

Lauren Greenfield.
Photo © Larry Busacca / Getty

Lauren Greenfield (Guardian) ‘The photographer and film-maker on the lovable billionaires in her new documentary, and the state of the American Dream’

Lauren Greenfield (GQ)

Annie Leibovitz (Youtube)

Bruce Gilden (Daylight)

Davide Monteleone (World Press Photo)

Cover photo © Gregory Heisler

Gregory Heisler (A Photo Editor)

One Problem with Running Your Own Photo Agency: It Takes a Lot of Time (PDN)

Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

Abe Frajndlich Tells of Photographing a Difficult Annie Leibovitz (Featureshoot)

Amanda Rivkin (NatGeo)

David Goldblatt (Source Magazine Oral History Archive)

Lisa Pritchard, Ask and Agent, Photography Rates for Advertorial Usage (LPA)

Damir Sagolj, 7 Photojournalism Tips by Reuters Photographer (Vimeo)

Sandy Huffaker Jr., gives us his tips on how to take beautiful street shots (Manfrotto)

Markéta Luskačová‘s best photograph: Ginger the musician (Guardian)

Series of interviews on the National Portrait Gallery website with photographers commissioned to take portraits of British Olympians…

Photo © Nadav Kander

Nadav Kander (NPG) Road to 2012

Bettina von Zwehl (NPG) Road to 2012

Brian Griffin (NPG) Road to 2012

Finlay Mackay (NPG) Road to 2012

Jillian Edelstein (NPG) Road to 2012

Anderson & Low (NPG) Road to 2012

Emma Hardy (NPG) Road to 2012

To finish off…. Calvin and Hobbes on truth and photography 

1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV IN FEZ, MOROCCO, 5-9 NOVEMBER 2012

© Boris Mikhailov

1000 Words is greatly honoured to announce our next workshop with the Ukrainian artist/photographer Boris Mikhailov in Fez, Morocco (5-9 November 2012). This is a very rare occasion to learn from one of the most highly-regarded contemporary photographers from the field of art and documentary.

“As a photographer with unofficial authority I discover, I observe, I clandestinely stalk.” Boris Mikhailov
BORIS MIKHAILOV:
Born in 1938, Boris Mikhailov is one of the most important photographers to have emerged from the former USSR. Starting photography in the 1960’s his work transgressed the moral and political dictates of the Soviet Regime. Although often engaged in the social disintegration affecting his country his work is subjectively rooted, dealing with the profound concerns of vulnerability and mortality. He has exhibited in numerous galleries and museums around the world notably the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, MOMA, and The Photographers’ Gallery, London. His projects Case History, The Wedding, Unfinished Dissertation, Look at Me I Look at Water, have been published as books. Boris Mikhailov was the recipient of the prestigious Hasselblad Award in 2000 and the Citibank Photography Prize in 2001.


ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:
The 1000 Words Workshop takes place in an authentically restored riadsituated in the medieval medina, at the heart of the beautifully evocative city of Fez, Morocco. The workshop will be an intense experience lasting five days between 5-9 May 2012 and will consist of 12 participants. The medina is a vibrant labyrinth that will permeate all the senses. Surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, it offers a visually stunning backdrop for this truly unique workshop.

We are looking for a diverse range of participants who understand the work of Boris Mikhailov and feel that their own art will benefit from his guidance. 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:
The cost of the workshop will be £1250 for 5 days. Once participants have been selected they will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit of £500 within two weeks. Participants can then pay the rest of the fee according to deadlines (see below). Participants are encouraged to arrive the day before the workshop begins for a welcome dinner. The price includes:

-tuition from Boris Mikhailov (including defining each participants project; shooting; editing sessions; creating a coherent body of work; creation of a slide show; projection of the images of the participants.)
-a welcome and farewell dinner
-lunch everyday and snacks during the afternoon
-24 hour help from the 1000 Words team and an assistant/translator with local knowledge.

Participants will be expected to make their own travel arrangements and find accommodation, which in Fez can range from £150 upwards for the week. We can advise on finding the accommodation that best suits you. Remember that most of your time will be spent either at the riad or shooting. For photographers using colour film we will provide the means for processing and a scanner. Photographers shooting digital will be expected to bring all necessary equipment. Please note that for the purposes and practicalities of a workshop, digital really is advisable. All participants should also bring a laptop if they have one. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual technical needs.

ABOUT US:
The organisations flagship is 1000 Words, an online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography in the UK and beyond. It reviews exhibitions and photobooks and publishes interviews, essays alongside carefully curated imagery, often around a particular theme. We are committed to showing the work of lesser-known but significant photographers alongside that of established practitioners in the aim of bringing their work to a wider audience. Often incredibly diverse in terms of subjects, concepts, styles and techniques, yet whilst always foregrounding the subjectivity of documentary art photography, 1000 Words intends to explore the limits and possibilities of the medium.

Released quarterly, the magazine attracts over 140,000 unique visitors from more than 120 countries every month. In May 2010 the 1000 Words Blog was ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs as part of a survey carried out by Creative Tourist and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts Photography Blog of the Year Award, 2010.

Yet 1000 Words is much more than just an online magazine. 1000 Words also operates a programme of exhibitions and events including workshops, artist talks, portfolio reviews, prizes and awards. 

1000 Words is governed by its board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are: Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark. The 1000 Words Workshops are organised by Tim Clark, founder and editor-in-chief at 1000 Words and Michael Grieve, 1000 Words deputy editor, senior lecturer at Nottingham Trent University and a photographer represented by Agence Vu. 


TESTIMONIALS:
“I have had the most profoundly moving, fascinating, difficult, wonderful week of my life. Thank you 1000 Words. Words can not describe. I have been continuing with my project. It feels different here, of course. And much slower progress. But still shooting with the same or similar mindset. All connected to what I did in Morocco. Really, really missing everyone. I feel privileged, truly, to have been part of it. Have been in the countryside with my parents since getting back and finally showed my mum the slideshow, with music that had been spinning around my head. She cried.” Laura 

“The Erik Kessels workshop in Fez has been a fantastic and motivational experience that I will carry with me my whole life.” Andy

“The choice of city (Fez) to develop such an educational and inspirational workshop is amazing, since the immersion begins as soon as you arrive. You are induced to leave your comfort zone and search for new references and perspectives, and given that the culture and language are so unique they also become great ingredients in this creative quest. The whole infrastructure offered during the workshop and also the specific venue where the meetings and tutorial activities took place were all part of the environment, serving to create a peaceful and harmonic atmosphere that continuously inspired us all during the workshop.” Alan

Antoine DAgata workshop in Fez was a mind shaking experience, and for me that was just what I needed! Antoines repeated question to me was, “but what do you want?” What a simple question it may seem but to truly honestly answer this was one of the hardest things. Antoine struggled with me daily to be truthful to the process of shooting and to my work. Trying to do this as a white woman in a muslim foreign country seemed scary at first. But soon enough this fear pushed me to go farther than I had before. To take more risks and be more bold. In the end, I had allowed myself to befriend men and women who were at first just strangers on the street. My once beautiful but safely intimate portraiture became more real for me, evoking not only the fear of letting myself leap in a strange place but in the process of doing so, being able to see so much more in others.

The workshop venue was such a treat and incredible place to be able to go to every day. A sanctuary to rest and to edit and collect your thoughts. A place to run into your fellow work shoppers and bounce around ideas. The food was more than I had expected and in fact pretty much the best food I ate in Morocco in my three weeks travel. Tim and Michael were so on top of the workshop; they were there managing every detail from accommodations, food, coordinating the class meetings, running film to labs, scanning, and even just being sweet and kind pals to talk with about your day or have a beer with and brainstorm about your project.

All in all, this workshop could not have been better and I feel so lucky to have had such an opportunity. Antoines phenomenal out of the box thinking and honesty is one of a kind. 1000 Words workshops fall into the ‘do not miss this’ category!” Katie

HOW TO SUBMIT:
We require that you send 10 images as low res jpegs and/or a link to your website, as well as a short biography and statement about why you think it will be relevant for you to work with Boris (approx. 200 words total). Submissions are to be sent to [email protected] with the following subject header: SUBMISSION FOR 1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV.

01 October 2012: Deadline for applications
03 October 2012: Successful candidates contacted
12 October 2012: Deposit due (£500)
31 October 2012: Second installment due (£750)
04 November 2012: Arrive in Morocco for welcoming dinner
05 November 2012: Workshop begins
09 November 2012: Workshop ends

Удачи!


1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV IN FEZ, MOROCCO, 5-9 NOVEMBER 2012

© Boris Mikhailov

1000 Words is greatly honoured to announce our next workshop with the Ukrainian artist/photographer Boris Mikhailov in Fez, Morocco (5-9 November 2012). This is a very rare occasion to learn from one of the most highly-regarded contemporary photographers from the field of art and documentary.

“As a photographer with unofficial authority I discover, I observe, I clandestinely stalk.” Boris Mikhailov
BORIS MIKHAILOV:
Born in 1938, Boris Mikhailov is one of the most important photographers to have emerged from the former USSR. Starting photography in the 1960’s his work transgressed the moral and political dictates of the Soviet Regime. Although often engaged in the social disintegration affecting his country his work is subjectively rooted, dealing with the profound concerns of vulnerability and mortality. He has exhibited in numerous galleries and museums around the world notably the Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, MOMA, and The Photographers’ Gallery, London. His projects Case History, The Wedding, Unfinished Dissertation, Look at Me I Look at Water, have been published as books. Boris Mikhailov was the recipient of the prestigious Hasselblad Award in 2000 and the Citibank Photography Prize in 2001.


ABOUT THE WORKSHOP:
The 1000 Words Workshop takes place in an authentically restored riadsituated in the medieval medina, at the heart of the beautifully evocative city of Fez, Morocco. The workshop will be an intense experience lasting five days between 5-9 May 2012 and will consist of 12 participants. The medina is a vibrant labyrinth that will permeate all the senses. Surrounded by the Atlas Mountains, it offers a visually stunning backdrop for this truly unique workshop.

We are looking for a diverse range of participants who understand the work of Boris Mikhailov and feel that their own art will benefit from his guidance. 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION:
The cost of the workshop will be £1250 for 5 days. Once participants have been selected they will be expected to pay a non-refundable deposit of £500 within two weeks. Participants can then pay the rest of the fee according to deadlines (see below). Participants are encouraged to arrive the day before the workshop begins for a welcome dinner. The price includes:

-tuition from Boris Mikhailov (including defining each participants project; shooting; editing sessions; creating a coherent body of work; creation of a slide show; projection of the images of the participants.)
-a welcome and farewell dinner
-lunch everyday and snacks during the afternoon
-24 hour help from the 1000 Words team and an assistant/translator with local knowledge.

Participants will be expected to make their own travel arrangements and find accommodation, which in Fez can range from £150 upwards for the week. We can advise on finding the accommodation that best suits you. Remember that most of your time will be spent either at the riad or shooting. For photographers using colour film we will provide the means for processing and a scanner. Photographers shooting digital will be expected to bring all necessary equipment. Please note that for the purposes and practicalities of a workshop, digital really is advisable. All participants should also bring a laptop if they have one. Every effort will be made to accommodate individual technical needs.



ABOUT US:
The organisations flagship is 1000 Words, an online magazine dedicated to contemporary photography in the UK and beyond. It reviews exhibitions and photobooks and publishes interviews, essays alongside carefully curated imagery, often around a particular theme. We are committed to showing the work of lesser-known but significant photographers alongside that of established practitioners in the aim of bringing their work to a wider audience. Often incredibly diverse in terms of subjects, concepts, styles and techniques, yet whilst always foregrounding the subjectivity of documentary art photography, 1000 Words intends to explore the limits and possibilities of the medium.

Released quarterly, the magazine attracts over 140,000 unique visitors from more than 120 countries every month. In May 2010 the 1000 Words Blog was ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs as part of a survey carried out by Creative Tourist and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts Photography Blog of the Year Award, 2010.

Yet 1000 Words is much more than just an online magazine. 1000 Words also operates a programme of exhibitions and events including workshops, artist talks, portfolio reviews, prizes and awards. 

1000 Words is governed by its board of directors who play an active role in the direction of the organisation. They are: Camilla Gore, Nicholas Barker, Simon Baker, Aron Morel, Louise Clements, Tim Clark, Michael Grieve and Norman Clark. The 1000 Words Workshops are organised by Tim Clark, founder and editor-in-chief at 1000 Words and Michael Grieve, 1000 Words deputy editor, senior lecturer at Nottingham Trent University and a photographer represented by Agence Vu. 


TESTIMONIALS:
“I have had the most profoundly moving, fascinating, difficult, wonderful week of my life. Thank you 1000 Words. Words can not describe. I have been continuing with my project. It feels different here, of course. And much slower progress. But still shooting with the same or similar mindset. All connected to what I did in Morocco. Really, really missing everyone. I feel privileged, truly, to have been part of it. Have been in the countryside with my parents since getting back and finally showed my mum the slideshow, with music that had been spinning around my head. She cried.” Laura 

“The Erik Kessels workshop in Fez has been a fantastic and motivational experience that I will carry with me my whole life.” Andy

“The choice of city (Fez) to develop such an educational and inspirational workshop is amazing, since the immersion begins as soon as you arrive. You are induced to leave your comfort zone and search for new references and perspectives, and given that the culture and language are so unique they also become great ingredients in this creative quest. The whole infrastructure offered during the workshop and also the specific venue where the meetings and tutorial activities took place were all part of the environment, serving to create a peaceful and harmonic atmosphere that continuously inspired us all during the workshop.” Alan

Antoine DAgata workshop in Fez was a mind shaking experience, and for me that was just what I needed! Antoines repeated question to me was, “but what do you want?” What a simple question it may seem but to truly honestly answer this was one of the hardest things. Antoine struggled with me daily to be truthful to the process of shooting and to my work. Trying to do this as a white woman in a muslim foreign country seemed scary at first. But soon enough this fear pushed me to go farther than I had before. To take more risks and be more bold. In the end, I had allowed myself to befriend men and women who were at first just strangers on the street. My once beautiful but safely intimate portraiture became more real for me, evoking not only the fear of letting myself leap in a strange place but in the process of doing so, being able to see so much more in others.

The workshop venue was such a treat and incredible place to be able to go to every day. A sanctuary to rest and to edit and collect your thoughts. A place to run into your fellow work shoppers and bounce around ideas. The food was more than I had expected and in fact pretty much the best food I ate in Morocco in my three weeks travel. Tim and Michael were so on top of the workshop; they were there managing every detail from accommodations, food, coordinating the class meetings, running film to labs, scanning, and even just being sweet and kind pals to talk with about your day or have a beer with and brainstorm about your project.

All in all, this workshop could not have been better and I feel so lucky to have had such an opportunity. Antoines phenomenal out of the box thinking and honesty is one of a kind. 1000 Words workshops fall into the ‘do not miss this’ category!” Katie


HOW TO SUBMIT:
We require that you send 10 images as low res jpegs and/or a link to your website, as well as a short biography and statement about why you think it will be relevant for you to work with Boris (approx. 200 words total). Submissions are to be sent to [email protected] with the following subject header: SUBMISSION FOR 1000 WORDS WORKSHOP WITH BORIS MIKHAILOV.

01 October 2012: Deadline for applications
03 October 2012: Successful candidates contacted
12 October 2012: Deposit due (£500)
31 October 2012: Second installment due (£750)
04 November 2012: Arrive in Morocco for welcoming dinner
05 November 2012: Workshop begins
09 November 2012: Workshop ends

Удачи!


Nick Turpin, Lunchtime

Nick Turpin, Lunchtime

Nick Turpin

Lunchtime,
New York, 2008
Website – NickTurpin.com

At the age of twenty British born Nick Turpin left his degree course at the University of Westminster to work as a staff photographer at The Independent Newspaper in London. In 1997 he left to pursue his passion for Street Photography financed by work as a design and advertising photographer. Nick describes himself as a 'Street Photography Evangelist"; in 2000 he founded the international Street Photographers group iN-PUBLiC and went on to found Nick Turpin Publishing in order to get Street Photography into print. In 2011 he produced In-Sight, a Street Photography documentary short which premiered at the Format International Photography Festival in Derby, UK. Nick has taught and lectured about Street Photography on the Discovery Channel, BBC Radio, at Tate Modern and Yale School of Art and writes the Street Photography blog SevenSevenNine.com. He lives between homes in London and the French Alps.