Tag Archives: Tagomago

Sylvain Granjon

Sylvain Granjon has just opened an exhibition at Galeria Tagomago that will travel to both gallery locations in Barcelona and Paris. The exhibit runs throught October 20th in Barcelona and moves to Paris from November 15th-18th.

Sylvain is a French artist who comes from the world of the circus and entertainment. After more than 20 years performing across the world in a number of street theater festivals, Sylvain now creates his magic with a camera, specializing in portraits and constructed realities. I am featuring a series of his daughter, Douce Amère, that is simply charming in it’s exploration of portraiture, humor, and appreciation for childish things.

DOUCE AMÈRE

I come from the entertainment world. I have been an entertainer for 20 years. I would say I’m an eccentric more than a clown.

This artificial world has been mine for all that time.
When I photograph my daughter, I photograph myself.
Her direct look has shaken my adult certainties. What I see in her eyes challenges me, as a grown child, as a father…
She seems to be asking me : “What have you become?”
When I portray my daughter there is a seriousness at odds 
with her young age.
I try to evoke the adult’s desperate quest for the mythical image of his own childhood; the source of all our emotions.
Sylvain Granjon, 2012

2011 Looking Back and Looking Forward

In memoriam, Riley Smithson Steinway 1998-2011

Looking Back
I think it’s important to take stock at the end of each year–to celebrate and be grateful for successes, to understand failures, and to set goals for the future. I feel particularly grateful this year. I was offered wonderful opportunities, got to travel to a variety of photo related events around the US and in China, and most importantly, am very appreciative that I can create work in a community that is incredibly supportive and communicative.

First, I want to thank the galleries and photographers that supported my curatorial efforts with the exhibitions Redefining Hollywood at the Factory Gallery and later at the Analog Salon in Los Angeles, and Summertime Exhibition at the Duncan Miller Projects in Santa Monica.

I am also appreciative for the opportunites to juror exhibitions and competitions: the Center for Fine Art Photography’s Dreams Exhibition, the Downtown: Incomplete LA exhibition at the Terrell Moore Gallery, Critical Mass 2011, and the upcoming Imagination exhibition at the A Smith Gallery in Texas and the I Spy:Camera Phone Photography at the Kiernan Gallery in Virginia. I am also thrilled to have attended Photolucida as an artist this year, and Review LA and Filter Photo Festival as a reviewer.

Thank you to the gallerists, directors, and editors for giving me the opportunity to share my work: Crista Dix from Wall Space Gallery, Valerie and Vicenc Boned from Galeria Tagomago, Jennifer Schwartz from the Jennifer Schwartz Gallery, Elizabeth Barragan and Kathleen Mahoney-Cobb from Finch & Ada, Dan Miller from the Duncan Miller Gallery, Jason Landry from The Panoptican Gallery, Daniel Cooney from the Emerging Artist’s Auction, The Darkroom Gallery, The Soho Photo Gallery, Ann Jastrab the Rayko Photo Gallery, the Honor Fraser Gallery, Melanie and Michelle Craven from the Tilt Gallery, Elizabeth Houston from Hous Projects, Liz Gordon from The Loft at Liz’s, Julia Dean from the Julia Dean Gallery, Amber Terranova from PDN, and more.

Teaching is a big part of my life and I want to extend a huge thank you to my AMAZING students in Los Angeles that I have worked with at the Julia Dean Photo Workshops over the years, and to my students in the virtual world–they continue to enrich my life and I am so proud of their accomplishments. It was a pleasure teaching workshops in Chicago and Colorado this year, and I look forward to my first experience at the Santa Fe Workshops in March, where I am teaching The Big Picture.

And lastly, thank YOU, the wonderful Lenscratch readers who remain curious and excited about looking at all kinds of photography. There are some changes afoot with the blogzine, so keep an eye out.

Some highlights?

It was an amazing year, one of those years where wonderful things happened when I was least expecting them. And I thought I’d have time lots of time to make new work…hmmm!

The cover of PDN and recognition for my workshop teaching…

Having my image on the cover, tickets, posters of the Photo Off Festival in Paris…this image was featured on the sides of buses and on posters around the city…

Traveling to China…

Looking Forward

My continuing goal is to make more time to create work. In order to do that, it means less time down the rabbit hole of Facebook and Twitter and social media outlets.

I want to get a book or two out into the world.

I want to explore more conceptual work and push traditional boundaries a bit.

To close,
I would love to hear from you–things you would like to see on Lenscratch, subjects you would like to see explored, or any ideas you want to pass my way.

I wish you all a very very happy, healthly, prosperous, and productive 2012! Be sure to visit the Favorite Photographs of 2011 Lenscratch Exhibition tomorrow!

Sean Lee

Sean Lee is a talented twenty-five year old photographer who lives and works in Singapore. His commercial work is stylized and dynamic, but his personal work is, well, personal. His series, Homework, will be on exhibition at Galeria Tagomago in Barcelona from July 7th – September 10th. In his short photography career, he has already garnered awards and solo shows, including the Discovery Award at the Arles Photo Festival, the Special Jury Prize at the Angkor Photo Festival, and the Icon de Martell Cordon Bleu, a photography prize that recognizes the most outstanding artist in Singapore.

On ʻHomeworkʼ:
I started making images about my family on a regular basis upon completing my course in the School of Theology in Singapore. It was also around that time that I started having a sneaky suspicion that the reason why I have always felt the need to create is because I was first created by an uncreated God. For some reason, this time spent in school in many ways elevated my love for making images. Strange, especially considering how nothing we learntat all was particularly related to photography.

I have always felt that the only kinds of work worth doing are the ones that we are utterly concerned about, whether in photography or otherwise. This is perhaps the reason why I turned to making images at home. There is a kind of quiet delight in photographing the members of my family. In many ways, the process of making pictures has made life at home a little less mundane and uneventful. Sometimes, itʼs almost magical. Like the time when I made my parents hug each other. That was the first time I had ever seen them being so physically intimate. It was pure joy for me.

I do different things with my family members in this work. Sometimes, I use them to say something about my thoughts on faith, desires and fears. Other times, I just want to make them touch each other, which is something that is very new to us. We never touch. And then there are times when I make them do completely weird and crazy things so that we can all laugh it together. That to me is one of the most magical things, making comedy with the camera.

I notice little things, like how looking at my family through the viewfinder feels so different from just looking at them. I am always surprised by their willingness to have their pictures taken and how they have gradually become more involved in the process, often giving me advice and opinions on the end products and setup. More recently, my dad and sister have been asking me to explain my work. I think I might just show them this.

To me, the best thing about this work has been how it has begun to affect all of us in the family and how we interact. This is what Iʼve been looking for ultimately: to be changed by what I do. It is not enough for me to just make images. Ultimately, I want my images to also make me. This work started off as a way for me to organise and to make sense of how I feel towards my family.Iʼm glad that it has turned into something more. I hope that you, too, will get something out of them.