Tag Archives: Street Photography

Douglas Ljungkvist, Untitled

Douglas Ljungkvist, Untitled

Douglas Ljungkvist

Untitled,
Ocean Beach, New Jersey, 2011
From the Ocean Beach series
Website – DouglasLjungkvist.com

Douglas Ljungkvist is originally from Goteborg Sweden. He is a self-taught photographer whose work examines places and environments, both public and private. After a long career in sales & marketing Douglas started photographing about eight years ago and full time for the past four. His work has been exhibited at the New York Photo Festival, Hereford Festival, London Street Photography Festival, Bridge Art Fair, and more. In 2011 he was awarded the gold prize at the Px3 Fine Art Book proposal category and participated at Review Santa Fe in 2010. His first monograph, Ocean Beach, will be published in the fall of 2013. He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Matt Licari

On October 26th, The Kiernan Gallery will host an evening for photographer, Matt Licari in his studio in Richmond, Virginia. Earlier this year, Matt unfortunately lost nearly all of his photography equipment in a robbery, so The Kiernan Gallery Presents: Matt Licari will be part fundraiser, part salon, as Matt’s
studio transforms into an alternative gallery space to display his work. I am featuring one of his series, Ride, about the experience of day to day travel on the NYC subway system.
Matt  received his BFA in photography from the School of Art +
Design at SUNY Purchase in New York. Inspired by street photography,
his work explores urban, suburban, and rural subjects. The work –
primarily in large format – has been exhibited widely, including Sasha
Wolf Gallery, Kris Graves Projects, and The Neuberger Museum of Art.
Licari has worked for the Guggenheim Museum and the Richard Avedon
Foundation, and currently serves as the Programs Chair of ASMP. He currently lives, works and travels between Richmond, Virginia and New York City. 
Ride is a series of images I have made in the New York City subway system. I’m a native New Yorker and have ridden the train since I was young, so the images didn’t start as an attempt to create a series, they were simply made in transit as I rode from place to place. I’m particularly fond of the el (elevated) lines due to the unique cityscapes they offer and the flickering, dappled light that the interior of the car receives. I also love the crowded midtown trains, where you often find every type of person in the same space. 
And of course, the elements provide another dimension to the rail system, which rarely seems to shut down even in inclement weather. It is not a conceptual series in the least – it is rather visceral – it is a place where people cram into a small space for a short time, and for the most part, deal with it quite gracefully. And then there are the people who don’t act so gracefully or ordinarily, which becomes a spectacle and sometimes a fun diversion for the rest of the travelers. The images are, in essence, about the experience of riding the train and seeing the city and it’s people through in that context. All images were made between 2008 and 2012 and are Untitled (Ride), year created.


Stephen McLaren

I had the pleasure of meeting Stephen McLaren in Los Angeles recently. Born in Scotland, Stephen is a London commercial photographer who specializes in street photography. He is the co-author with Sophie Howarth of the Thames and Hudson book, Street Photography Now, which was published in October 2010.

Stephen was a television director and journalist making documentaries for the BBC before digital cameras brought him back to photography.  His work has been shown in numerous exhibitions in England and has appeared in international newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, New Yorker and the Observer. He has also curated street photography exhibitions which have travelled across Europe with the British Council.


Hegemonic is a project I am working-on which looks at three global cities, Beijing, Los Angeles, and London. Through photography I am trying to explore the source of their power as pre-eminent city-states, both in relation to their own citizens and to the wider world. I am hopeful that I can produce a book which deals with these themes and looks at the similarities and differences between these hegemonic cities.   

These three cities have more in common than they might admit. All rely on large immigrant populations to keep their economies turning, all are adept at creating and sustaining myths of power and wealth, and all are constantly-reinventing themselves to ensure their dominance over competitors. Despite their history of muscular expansion and boundless optimism all three cities have been experiencing self-doubt in the new millenium.

Beijing wonders if it can maintain social cohesion as it rushes headlong into a financialized future, Los Angeles worries about the sustainability of natural resources and its sense of identity as immigration continues, while London frets that the City of London, whose financial muscle has sustained its global clout, is on the wane.

Photographically I am reacting to the changes that these cities are currently undergoing and trying to find connecting threads which bind these urban exemplars together across three continents and twenty thousand miles.

Bryan Formhals, Genesee Ave.

Bryan Formhals, Genesee Ave.

Bryan Formhals

Genesee Ave.,
West Hollywood, California, 2007
From the Genesee Ave. series
Website – BryanFormhalsPhotography.com

Bryan Formhals is a New York based photographer and the publisher of LPV Magazine. After suffering writer's block while living in Los Angeles in 2005, he took up photography and has been obsessed ever since. Loosely following the tradition of street photography he explores the urban environment and the way humans shape and interact with it. His Genesee Ave. project is a series of photographs taken from 2006 to just shortly after the 2008 election when he decided to leave Los Angeles after four and half years. He is a founding member of the strange.rs collective.
 

Homage to Paul Graham: A Present, Paris

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Homage to Paul Graham, A Present, Paris Jim Casper

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Paul Graham, from The Present: 8th Avenue and 42nd Street, 16th July 2010, 12:55:09 pm. Fotografia . Courtesy Mack Books.

Street photography is perhaps the defining genre of photographic art. Seminal works by Walker Evans, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank and Garry Winogrand display photographys astonishing dance with life, and its unique role in forming our perceptions of the modern world.

The Present is Paul Grahams contribution to this legacy. The images in [his latest] book come unbidden from the streets of New York, but are not quite what we might expect, for each moment is brought to us with its double two images taken from the same location, separated only by the briefest fraction of time. We find ourselves in sibling worlds, where a businessman with an eye patch becomes, an instant later, a man with an exaggerated wink; a man eating a banana walks towards us, and a small focus shift reveals the blind man right behind him.

Although there are flashes of surprise a woman walks confidently down the street one moment, only to tumble to the ground a second later for the most part there is little of the drama street photography is addicted to. People arrive and depart this quiet stage, with the smallest shift of time and attention revealing where life is frozen rigid. A suited young businessman crosses the road, only to be replaced by his homeless alternate; a woman in a pink t-shirt is engulfed with tears, but seconds later there is a content shopper in her place.

The Present gives us an impression quite different to most street photography where life is frozen. Here we glimpse the continuum: before/after, coming/going, either/or. Press releases SEO . A present that is a fleeting and provisional alignment, with no singularity or definitiveness; a world of shifting awareness and alternate realities, where life twists and spirals in a fraction of a second to another moment, another world, another consciousness.

The Present is the third in Paul Grahams trilogy of projects on America which began with American Night in 2003 and was followed in 2007 by a shimmer of possibility (winner of the Paris Photo Book Prize 2011 for the most significant photo book of the past 15 years). Directory Submission . The Present takes Grahams reputation as a master of the book form to new heights, employing multiple gatefolds to convey passages of time and the unfolding of urban life.

Text from the press release for The Present, the latest photo book by Paul Graham.

Paris: 5-day Photography Masterclass w/ Jeff Cowen & Jim Casper

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Anonymous, Berlin, 2007 © Jeff Cowen

SUMMARY

Location: Central Paris, France
Dates: October 18-22, 2012
Fee: 9900 NOK
Limit: 15 photographers
Full details (in Norwegian and English): Bilder Nordic School of Photography

ABOUT THE MASTERCLASS

This masterclass will be a 5 day marathon for photographers interested in making a significant vertical leap in their work. It is geared to fine art photography and reportage as art.

This masterclass is coordinated by Bilder Nordic School of Photography in Oslo, Norway, in partnership with Lens Culture in Paris, France.

– The class will emphasize shooting, editing and the final print. Shooting will take place in central Paris and in the studio. Students will have the opportunity to work with street photography, the nude, still life, and abstraction during the course of the class. There will also be group visits to some photography-based cultural institutions throughout Paris.

– Class members will be expected to bring a body of work in progress to be discussed by the group. Each participant will also receive one-on-one consultations with Jim Casper and Jeff Cowen.

– Mr. Cowen will stress how digital photographers can learn to use new technology while respecting the tradition of analogue-based photography and its position as a medium with respect to art history.

– Career possibilities in photography and the artist’s path will also be topics for discussion. This class offers a unique perspective to create a dialogue with a working artist and an international photography critic, publisher and lecturer.

ABOUT JEFF COWEN

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Jeff Cowen is a New York University honors scholar in Oriental studies. 25 years ago he was the assistant of Ralph Gibson and Larry Clark. His early street photography in New York City and his reportage work of the Romanian Revolution is in numerous collections and has been shown in Museums such as The Filature in Mulhouse and the New York Historical Society Museum.

Mr. Cowen is known for his painterly style. He works with the figure, landscape, abstraction and still life. He is represented by several leading galleries and his work is in over one hundred collections and institutions. His first monograph was published by Paris-Musée, and his galleries have produced books for his many solo shows around the world.

He participates regularly in art fairs such as Art Basel, Art Cologne, Art Bolonga, Arco, Photo Espana, LaArt Fair, Art Paris and others. In the fall 2012, his work will be exhibited at the Grand Palais in Paris in a special museum exhibition by the Huis Marseille Photography Museum during Paris Photo and the Month of Photography.

ABOUT JIM CASPER

Jim Casper is the founder and director of Lens Culture, an international organization dedicated to the celebration and promotion of contemporary photography in all of its forms.

Lens Culture publishes one of the most popular online magazines about global contemporary photography (www.lensculture.com), and organizes the yearly Lens Culture International Exposure Awards (www.lensculture.com/awards), and the annual Lens Culture FotoFest Paris international portfolio reviews (www.fotofest-paris.com) in partnership with Paris Photo and FotoFest International, in the USA.

Casper is a curator, writer, publisher and lecturer. He also serves on juries around the world.

APPLICATION/REQUIREMENTS:

Requirements: This course is open to all serious photographers. Digital printing equipment will be available for all participants. If you choose to work with film, we have arranged for professional lab film processing, contact sheets and digital scanning (you must pay extra for the lab work). We do not have a full darkroom available, so we will focus on digital printing for this purposes of this workshop.

Equipment: Bring your own camera, and a laptop if possible.

Price: NOK 9900,- (Maximum 15 persons. Material costs, travel and stay is not included.)

Conditions: Before signing up, please read the conditions and agreement carefully.

How to register: Sign up here.

THE WORKSHOP WILL BE HELD IN ENGLISH.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

  • APhotoEditor and Conscientious Extended do round-ups of the many arguments and comments ignited by an NPR intern’s blog post about never paying for music and David Lowery‘s response to the post, looping in MediaStorm’s recent pay-per-story model announcement and its reception to explore what these kinds of attitudes could mean for the creative fields in general.
  • The highly anticipated, so-called “Google Glasses” were demoed at the I/O conference this week, PetaPixel reports. These camera-equiped goggles, which are set to ship sometime next year, could one day allow point-of-view shooting and instant sharing online. The relatively discreet $1500 device has the potential to bring about the most radical change to street photography since the development of the 35mm film camera.
  • Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey blogs about packing up and heading off to Les Rencontres d’Arles, ”arguably one of the most important international photography assemblages,” where he’ll be doing free portfolio reviews along with the rest of the staff of Burn Magazine. Additionally at Arles, sixty exhibitions by photographers including Sam Falls, Regine Petersen, and Jonathan Torgovnik, author of the monograph Intended Consequences, are on view through September 23.
  • Boston‘s The Big Picture shares photos from LGBT pride events taken around the world, some of which were met with violence and intimidation. The New Yorker‘s Photobooth shares a selection of black-and-white images from the 70s and 80s, “Forty-Three Years After Stonewall,” when a riot at a popular Manhattan gay bar in response to a routine police raid ignited the LGBT rights movement.
  • Feature Shoot shares a terrific hour-long streaming documentary on Magnum Photo founder Henri Cartier-Bresson, “Just Plain Love,” which features backstories from many famous photographs, directed by Raphaël O’Byrne in 2001.
  • Photoshop, the Game, otherwise known as LevelUp for Photoshop, which offers the opportunity for users of the software to improve their skills, learn new features, and win prizes, is free online until July 15, 2012, reports John Nack. Maybe by then, you too can be as good as Kelli Connell, whose exhibition Double Life is on view through this Saturday, June 30.

Aperture Announces its Fall 2012 Releases

For Fall 2012 Aperture presents a list of new and re-issued publications, from the startling and fresh, to new editions and long-awaited anthologies. Read more about our upcoming releases, and view a slideshow of Fall 2012 cover art below.

Upcoming titles include:

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard
101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides
Petrochemical America by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff
The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin
Life’s a Beach by Martin Parr
Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama
Aperture Magazine Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976
The Garden at Orgeval by Paul Strand
• Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island, Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl

Rickard_Cover

Metinides_Cover

Petrochemical_America_Cover

Ballad_Cover

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Moriyama_Cover

Anthology_Cover

Strand_Cover

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September 2012

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard


Doug Rickard’s A New American Picture offers a startling and fresh perspective on American street photography. While on first glance the work looks reassuringly familiar and well within the traditional bounds of the genre, his methodology is anything but conventional. All of the images are appropriated from Google Street View; over a period of two years, Rickard took advantage of the technology platform’s comprehensive image archive to virtually drive the unseen and overlooked roads of America, bleak places that are forgotten, economically devastated, and abandoned. With an informed and deliberate eye, Rickard finds and decodes these previously photographed scenes of urban and rural decay. He rephotographs the machine-made images as they appear on his computer screen, framing and freeing them from their technological origins.

12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (31.8 x 24.8 cm); 
144 pages, 90 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-219-2
; $60.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: North America


101 Tragedies of Enrique
 Metinides


101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides is Enrique Metinides’ choice of the 101 key images from his life photographing crime scenes and accidents in Mexico for local newspapers and the nota roja (or “red pages,” for their bloody content) crime press. Accompanying each image, extended captions give his account of the situation depicted, describing the characters and life of the streets, the sadness of families, the criminals, and the heroism of emergency workers—revealing much about himself in the process. Having received his first camera at the age of ten, Metinides became a capable street photographer by the time he was twelve, already working with police and firefighters to get his best shots. Now also found in museum collections around the world, his images are compelling, immediate, sometimes shocking, and always authentic. Selected photographs are also paired with their original newsprint tearsheets, collected by Metinides, the typography of which have inspired the design of this book. The photographs have been compiled by Trisha Ziff, a filmmaker and curator who knows Metinides well, and who also contributes an essay about his life, work, and personality.

8 1/2 x 10 3/8 in. (21.6 x 26.4 cm); 
192 pages, 
150 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-211-6
; $50.00/£35.00
; September 2012; 
Rights: World


Petrochemical America
by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff


Petrochemical America features Richard Misrach’s haunting photographic record of Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor, accompanied by landscape architect Kate Orff’s Ecological Atlas—a series of “speculative drawings” developed through research and mapping of data from the region. Their joint effort depicts and unpacks the complex cultural, physical, and economic ecologies along 150 miles of the Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to New Orleans, an area of intense chemical production that first garnered public attention as “Cancer Alley” when unusual occurrences of cancer were discovered in the region.

This collaboration has resulted in an unprecedented, multilayered document presenting a unique narrative of visual information. Petrochemical America offers in-depth analysis of the causes of decades of environmental abuse along the largest river system in North America. Even more critically, the project offers an extensively researched guidebook to the way in which the petrochemical industry has permeated every facet of contemporary life.

 An exhibition coinciding with the release of the book will take place at Aperture Gallery in fall 2012.

13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm); 216 pages (plus 24-page insert), 
150 four-color images; Hardcover; ISBN 978-1-59711-191-1; $80.00/£50.00; September 2012; 
Rights: World


The Ballad of Sexual 
Dependency
by Nan Goldin


The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a visual diary chronicling the struggle for intimacy and understanding between friends, family, and lovers—collectively described by Nan Goldin as her “tribe.” Her work describes a world that is visceral, charged, and seething with life. First published in 1986, this reissue recognizes the persistent relevance and freshness of Nan Goldin’s cutting-edge photography.

Over the past twenty-five years, the influence of Ballad on photography and other aesthetic realms has continually grown, making the work a contemporary classic. Nan Goldin’s story of urban life on the fringe was the swan song of an era that reached its peak in the early eighties. Yet it has captured an important element of humanity that is transcendent: a need to connect.

This new edition of The Ballad of Sexual Dependency has been printed using new scans and separations created by master-separator Robert Hennessey from Goldin’s original slides and transparencies, rendering them with unparalleled sumptuousness and impact.

10 x 9 in. (25.4 x 22.9 cm); 
148 pages, 
126 four-color images; 
Clothbound with jacket
; ISBN 978-1-59711-208-6; 
$50.00/£35.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: World (excluding France)


Life’s a Beach
by Martin Parr


In the United Kingdom, one is never more than seventy-five miles away from the coast. With this much shoreline, it’s not surprising that there is a strong British tradition of photography by the seaside. American photographers may have given birth to street photography, but according to photographer Martin Parr, “in the UK, we have the beach!” Here, he asserts, people can relax, be themselves, and show off all those traces of mildly eccentric British behavior.

First released in a signed and numbered limited-edition run, Life’s a Beach shows Parr at its best, startling us with the moments of captured absurdity and immersing us in the rituals and traditions associated with beach life all over the world. A trade edition will follow in spring 2013.

11 x 9 in. (27.9 x 22.9 cm); 
98 four-color images;
 Slipcased hardcover; 
Signed and numbered limited-edition;
 ISBN 978-1-59711-224-6; 
$150.00/£95.00;
 September 2012;
 Rights: World (excluding France)


October 2012

Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama


Throughout Daido Moriyama’s extensive career, he has continually sought new ways of presenting and recontextualizing his work, frequently recasting his images through the use of different printing techniques, installation, or re-editing and re-formatting. In each iteration, images both old and new take on changed and newly charged significance. This volume, created during preparations for several international survey exhibitions, offers both the photographer and the viewer the opportunity to consider the photographer’s life work in a fresh light.

Moriyama has always sought meaning in the raw accumulation and gestalt of sequences of images. Labyrinth makes public an exercise in reconsideration that the photographer has assigned to himself. In opening up this private process of re-examination to a wider public, Moriyama continues to challenge the viewer and his own practice, as well as the larger mechanisms by which photography functions and creates meaning.

11 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (30 x 35 cm); 
304 pages, 
300 duotone images; 
Paperback with flaps; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-217-8
; $80.00/£50.00; 
October 2012
 Rights: World (excluding Japan)


Aperture Magazine
 Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976


Published on the occasion of Aperture magazine’s sixtieth anniversary, this is the first anthology of Aperture magazine ever published. This long-awaited volume will provide a selection of the best critical writing from the first twenty-five years of the magazine—the period spanning the tenure of cofounder and editor Minor White.

The texts and visuals in this anthology were selected by Peter C. Bunnell, White’s protégé and an early member of the Aperture staff, who went on to become a major force in photography as an influential writer, curator, and professor. Several documents from Aperture’s founders and individual articles are reproduced in facsimile, and the book is enlivened by other distinctive elements, including a portfolio of each cover, and a selection of epigrams and editorials that appeared at the front of each issue. An extensive index of every contributor to the first twenty-five years of the magazine makes this an indispensible resource.

6 1/2 x 9 3/8 in. (16.5 x 23.8 cm); 
448 pages
, 150 four-color images;
 Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-196-6;
$39.95/£25.00;
 October 2012
 Rights: World


The Garden at Orgeval
by Paul Strand


After a lifetime of working on a series of “collective portraits” in far-flung places such as Mexico; Ghana; Italy; Tir a’Mhurain, Scotland; and his adoptive country, France, an aging Paul Strand decided to concentrate on still lifes and the stony beauty of his own garden at Orgeval, France, as a site in which to distill his discoveries as a photographer. The work that constitutes The Garden at Orgeval is marked by close and careful study of the forms and patterns within nature—of tiny button-shaped flowers, cascading winter branches, and fierce snarls of twigs. While the images bear the same directness and precise vision that is quintessentially Strand, the work also reflects a growing metaphorical turn.

Renowned photographer Joel Meyerowitz—whose own affinity toward Strand’s Orgeval series stems from a lifetime of photographing in different genres and ultimately returning to nature as an enduring subject—has selected the photographs in the book, and he responds to them in an accompanying personal essay, reflecting on issues, including the contemplation of one’s garden, and growing old. Beautifully produced in a modest size, in the manner of a volume of poems, this book’s task is to do credit to Strand’s final work, both as an individual and as a key figure in Modernist photography.

8 x 10 3/8 in. (20.3 x 26.4 cm); 
96 pages, 
42 duotone images 
Clothbound; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-124-9; 
$45.00/£30.00; 
October 2012, Rights: World


Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island
(Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl)


In October 2012, Four Freedoms Park—the last design Louis I. Kahn completed before his untimely death in 1974—will open on Roosevelt Island in New York City, over forty years after its commission as a memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Barney Kulok’s black-and-white photographs of the building site function as a meditation on the materiality and formal underpinnings of Kahn’s architectural thinking. Unbuilt is at once a historical record and a multilayered visual investigation of form and the subtleties of texture—elements of fundamental importance to Kahn’s philosophies. As architect Steven Holl writes, “Kulok’s photographs free the subject matter from a literal interpretation of the site. They stand as ‘Equivalents’ to the words about material, light, and shadow that Louis Kahn often spoke.”

11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.5 cm); 80 pages, 40 duotone images; Hardcover with jacket; Signed and numbered limited edition of 1,000 copies; 987-1-59711-TKT-K; $TK.TK/£TK.TK; October 2012, Rights: World

For all press inquiries please contact:

Barbara Escobar
Publicity and Events Manager
212.946.7123
bescobar(at)aperture.org
publicity(at)aperture.org