Tag Archives: Storytelling

TIME’s Best Portraits of 2012

A great portrait captures the very essence of its subject, and this year, TIME continued its long legacy of storytelling with a number of compelling photographs. Search Engine Optimization . linkwheel creation . 2012 saw newsmakers in several categories and countries, so we sent photographers around the world to capture them as they made their mark. In Turkey, Peter Hapak photographed several Syrian families who had sought refuge in the country after fleeing their homeland to escape the brutality of Assad’s regime; in Iowa, Martin Schoeller captured Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas as the young gymnast trained both in the gym and at home; and in Israel, Marco Grob photographed Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who, in 2012, proved that his influence is not only large, but lasting. Their portraits and the rest in this gallery are visual testaments to the diverse and colorful personalities who made 2012 memorable; herewith, a look at TIME’s best commissioned portraits this year.

Alexi Hobbs

Some photographers are born story tellers.  They make work that feels like a visit with an old friend, or a relative who is sharing memories of a life lived–a scrapbook of images that tell our stories.  Alexi Hobbs is one of those photographers. He has the gift of the narrative and brings us along on his insightful explorations of place and family.  His project, Hunters and Heirs, looks at family traditions and shared experiences that stem from a time of need, not want.

Alexi is a fine-art and editorial photographer from Montreal. He has shot editorial work for publications such as Time, Monocle, Dwell, enRoute and Afar. His prints have been fortunate enough to have graced the walls of galleries in Canada, the United States and even a museum in Russia. Most recently he has been selected as a winner of the Magenta Foundation’s 2012 Flash Forward Emerging Photographers competition.

Hunters and Heirs: In 1941, my grandfather, Antonio ‘Pit’ Allard deserted the army to avoid fighting in World War II. He spent four years in hiding on the Gaspesian peninsula and four winters isolated in the forest, working alone as a lumberjack, living off beans and lard. He broke the monotony by trapping hare and shooting partridges. This was a time when hunting was a means to a very vital end, not a weekend hobby. It was a way of life and a source of food.  

When the war ended, Pit settled down in the city, started a family and moved on. However, he never gave up hunting. It reminds him of who he is, where he comes from and why he is still here today.

My grandfather is known for his storytelling. His stories, based both in historical fact and myth, have become part of our family’s identity. They tell of time spent in the wild and many of them find their origin in these hunting trips. In October of 2009, I followed him into the woods, not only to document part of my family’s history, as a photographer, but also to become part of it by actively participating in what would undoubtedly be added to the library of folktales, recounted at the next family gathering. I went to document my family during this transition and to remember who we are, where we come from and ultimately, the reason we are all here. 

Photo Resource – Free guide to Selling Nature Photography from Photoshelter

If you want some tips for getting your nature photos out there, sign up for a free PDF guide Selling Nature Photography. The guide has been compiled by Photoshelter in partnership with Outdoor Photographer and offers tips to grow your nature photography business with interviews from leading photographers like Art Wolfe, Jerry Monkman and Martin Bailey. It also include insights from experienced photo buyers, including the Senior Photo Editor at National Geographic.

  • Six questions to ask yourself before pitching editorial clients
  • Seven tips to get your nature photography featured in public spaces
  • How to turn your passion into a thriving business
  • Why storytelling and nature photography go hand and hand
  • Why being persistent in your business and protecting your interests is a must.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Products Tagged: free photo guide, nature photography, Outdoor Photographer, PhotoShelter, Selling Nature Photography

Martin Parr: Picturing the American South

The High Museum of Art commissioned Martin Parr to document Atlanta as part of its Picturing the South project—a series of artist commissions that engage with the American South. Channeling his unparalleled ability to collate humor, wit, and curiosity into his heavily socio-cultural photographs, Parr captured the oddities and eccentricities of contemporary Americana.

British-born Parr, whose photography career spans over 30 years, is known for his provocative documentary style by using cultural criticism through an exaggerated and humorous light. His analysis of how we live is not simply satire, as Parr offers his audience an approach to seeing which acts not to denounce, but to highlight (both aesthetically and thematically) patterns between people, the things we consume and the milieus in which we live.

The outcome of the museum’s commission offers a vivid, comedic and touching perspective on the diversity that lies in Atlanta. Parr covers a large body of subject matter in his findings, which ranges from the high and low—juxtaposing images from a gallery opening to an oddly lengthy corn dog on a stick. Parr’s images offer insight which would only be found through the lens of a meticulous and curious outsider.

Beyond the exhibition at the High Museum of Art, Italian publisher Contrasto released a book, Up and Down Peachtree: Photographs of Atlantaand a documetary, Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South. The book, a meticulously edited and impeccably designed object in its own right, is printed without text beyond the book’s title and colophon—which, undeniably, is a testament to Parr’s talent for storytelling. The documentary is a 60-minute lens behind the lens where documentarian Neal Broffman followed Parr photographing around Atlanta. The documentary includes interviews with noted curators, writers, critics and photographers, and offers a look into at Parr’s real-life affable personality and interactions with his subjects. Below, Contrasto has given LightBox an exclusive clip on the documentary:

Martin Parr’s photographs are on view now through September 9, 2012, as part of Picturing the South: New Commissions from the High Museum of Art. Up and Down Peachtree and Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South are both available for purchase online.

Photo News: Yaakov Israel wins PHotoEspaña Descubrimientos PHE12 award

The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey, ©Yaakov Israel. Photo courtesy of the photographer.

I’m so happy to report that Israeli photographer Yaakov Israel has won the PHotoEspaña Descubrimientos (PHE12 Discoveries) 2012 Award for his series The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey. As the winner Israel will take part in PHotoEspaña 2013. The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey was the inaugural exhibition in May at Zelda Cheatle and Deborah Goldman’s new gallery Margaret Street Gallery, see images below, including one of Yaakov and his wife Maya. The work is featured in a book of the same name published by Schilt Publishing.

I first saw Israel’s work at Arles photo festival a few years ago and interviewed him for the April/May 2012 issue of Hotshoe. Excerpt from the feature I wrote in Hotshoe April/May 2012: “A quest is a specific type of journey, one that implies a search for something, and is a familiar plot device used in narratives, both visual and literary. As used in the title of Yaakov’s debut monograph, it is a concept that replaced that of the “photographic journey” as the project developed. In tandem with the idea of a quest, there is also a type of storytelling, more akin to that of a parable, flowing through the book. For Yaakov, the turning point came when he met a man on a white donkey in 2006 – four years into the project. “In the Jewish tradition, this man is supposed to be a religious prophet dressed in white robes. Whereas the man I met was a Palestinian farmer who materialized in the Judean desert in 45-degree heat. The encounter had a biblical feel to it and made me realize that I was really on a quest to explore what it means to be Israeli, and for me to live in this country. Up until then I’d just been looking, but once I understood the project – when I could write down what I was looking for – it presented itself everywhere. It didn’t matter where I was.

“Thus, Yaakov also embarks on an internal, psychological quest in his search for self-identity in a fractured and complex cultural context. “The more I worked on the project, the more I understood that it was not just about the geographical or social aspects of contemporary Israel, but also about the myths and the religions, as well as political and human aspects. It’s like I’m looking for something that only exists when I look at it,” he says. The images that are included in the book therefore are ones that represent for him “the journey and the idea of the journey simultaneously – the mental journey, the physical journey, and the idea of the quest”. Miranda Gavin

The jury of Descubrimientos PHE12 consisted of Anne McNeill, director of Impressions Gallery (Bradford, United Kingdom); Markus Schaden, editor and founder of Schaden (Germany); and Roger Szmulewicz, director of the Fifty One Fine Art Photography Gallery(Belgium).  Israel’s porfolio was presented in a review session at Centro de Arte Alcobendas of Madrid during June.

The winners of the last editions of the prize are Fernando Brito,Vanessa Winship, Alejandra Laviada, Yann Gross, Harri Palviränta, Stanislas Guigui, Vesselina Nikolaeva, Comenius Röthlisberger, Pedro Álvarez, Tanit Plana, Sophie Dubosc, Juan de la Cruz Megías, Paula Luttringer and Matías Costa.

Filed under: Art shows, Photo & Press Agencies, Photography Bursaries Tagged: Descubrimientos, Israel, Margaret Street Gallery, PHotoEspaña, photographer, Schilt Publishing, Yaakov Israel, Zelda Cheatle

New Books by Christian Patterson and Deborah Luster on Sale at the MoCP Bookstore

1.11.12_Patterson_blog.jpg
Christian Patterson, Storm Cellar, 2008

Crime Unseen closes on Sunday, but that doesn’t mean you have to stop enjoying the exhibition.

Exhibiting artists Christian Patterson and Deborah Luster recently released books containing their works showcased in Crime Unseen. Each book takes a different spin on chronicling real-life murder.

In his book, Redheaded Peckerwood, Christian Patterson melds documentary style with creative storytelling as he follows the trail of teenage lovers Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate, who, in the winter of 1957-58, committed a string of murders in Nebraska and Wyoming. By taking photographs and documents stemming directly from their crimes, Patterson focuses on the inherent emotional responses people have toward these objects even before they know the objects’ dark origins. MoCP Curator and Associate Director Karen Irvine wrote the book’s forward.

In Tooth for an Eye: A Chronology of Violence in Orleans Parish, Deborah Luster explores New Orleans, a city where the murder rate is eight times that of the national average. Each image in the book brings the viewer in through the gun sight to the murder location, which teems with disruptive energy. In this way, Luster––whose own mother was a victim of violent crime–creates a complex and vivid portrait of loss and remembrance.

Visit our online shop to purchase these books, or any other title from our bookstore. For more information about Crime Unseen, please visit our website.

New Books by Christian Patterson and Deborah Luster on Sale at the MoCP Bookstore

1.11.12_Patterson_blog.jpg
Christian Patterson, Storm Cellar, 2008

Crime Unseen closes on Sunday, but that doesn’t mean you have to stop enjoying the exhibition.

Exhibiting artists Christian Patterson and Deborah Luster recently released books containing their works showcased in Crime Unseen. Each book takes a different spin on chronicling real-life murder.

In his book, Redheaded Peckerwood, Christian Patterson melds documentary style with creative storytelling as he follows the trail of teenage lovers Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate, who, in the winter of 1957-58, committed a string of murders in Nebraska and Wyoming. By taking photographs and documents stemming directly from their crimes, Patterson focuses on the inherent emotional responses people have toward these objects even before they know the objects’ dark origins. MoCP Curator and Associate Director Karen Irvine wrote the book’s forward.

In Tooth for an Eye: A Chronology of Violence in Orleans Parish, Deborah Luster explores New Orleans, a city where the murder rate is eight times that of the national average. Each image in the book brings the viewer in through the gun sight to the murder location, which teems with disruptive energy. In this way, Luster––whose own mother was a victim of violent crime–creates a complex and vivid portrait of loss and remembrance.

Visit our online shop to purchase these books, or any other title from our bookstore. For more information about Crime Unseen, please visit our website.