Tag Archives: Still Image

John Stezaker Awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize

For more than 30 years, artist John Stezaker has used found images as his primary medium. In his compositions, black-and-white studio portraits become surreal two-faced beings; elsewhere, a woman’s face is replaced by the crashing white waves of an illustrated postcard. These collages, which use classic movie stills, vintage postcards and book illustrations, are sliced and re-arranged into entirely new forms—they’re simple constructions, but Stezaker’s eye for the uncanny makes them powerful.

On Sept. 3, Stezaker was awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, which recognizes a significant contribution to the medium of photography through exhibition or publication, for his presentation of photographic collages last year at the Whitechapel Gallery in London.

The £30,000 prize (about $48,000) is organized by The Photographers’ Gallery in London. “Stezaker’s work has been influential on a new generation of image-makers,” said Brett Rogers, the Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, in a statement. “Within the vastness of today’s image flow, Stezaker has managed to resurrect the power and uncanny mystery inherent in the still image using traditional photographic strategies, most especially collage.”

Stezaker’s exhibition at Whitechapel showcased work from the 1970s until today.

“I am dedicated to fascination—to image fascination, a fascination for the point at which the image becomes self-enclosed and autonomous. It does so through a series of processes of disjunction,” Stezaker said in a statement from Whitechapel.

John Stezaker is a London-based artist. See more of his work here.

An exhibition of the artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 is on display at The Photographers’ Gallery, London until Sept. 9.

Aperture, Chris Boot @ LOOK3 Festival

According to Time Magazine’s LightBox, “The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear [for the 2012 iteration.]” This weekend, the visions of Musi and Griffin come to fruition as Charlottesville, Virginia plays host to LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph 2012.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph returns June 7 through 9. Pinned as a “celebration of photography, created by photographers, for those who share a passion for the still image,” LOOK3 is sponsored by BD, National Geographic magazine, and Canon USA, and hosted this year along Charlottesville, VA’s Downtown Mall. The Festival features exhibits and on-stage appearances of three “INsight” photographers, as well as exhibitions, outdoor projections, workshops and interviews over three days and nights.

INsight artists Alex Webb, Donna Ferrato, and Stanley Greene will be featured in 2012, three artists who have met the standards of having produced a significant body of work, and who are understood to possess the capacity to inspire others in the field. The weekend’s masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman, as well as Aperture Foundation’s Executive Director Chris Boot, whose more than 25 years in photography has yielded countless books commissioned, edited or published since 1984.

Aperture will be further present, assembling a special exhibition, Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing—first through the eponymous magazine then, starting in the 1960s, through books—that will reflect on one of the most comprehensive and influential libraries in the history of photography.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph
June 7 through 9, 2012
Downtown mall and other venues
Charlottesville, Virginia

Chris Boot MASTERS TALK
June 8, 2012, 11am
The Paramount Theater

Aperture at Sixty Library
June 7 through 17, 2012
200 Water St

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›› La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex WebbBruce GildenStanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ workLA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.

Time & photography: stopping, compressing, slowing – amazing

Photographer and techno-wizard Adam Magyar has been working on a tricky time-based photographic series entitled Stainless since 2009. For this series, Magyar takes tack-sharp photographs of moving subway trains that look like they are stopped still. Owing to the technique he uses [compiling thousands of high-speed single pixel scanner images into one image], in the photograph below, it is impossible to see with the human eye what he is able to stitch together from high-definition slivers of reality — what you see at the left side of the train actually happened 12 seconds earlier than what you see on the right side of the train.

Recently, Magyar made this slow motion video to give an idea of how much time passes — and how much motion and activity takes place — during the making of one of his high-tech compressed images. The video shows how people inside the subway trains could see the platform and the people waiting there if the human brain could process what his camera can.

This clip contains 3 arrivals of Subway U2 to Alexanderplatz. It takes about 12 seconds for a train to leave the tunnel and stop at the station. These arrivals each are stretched in time to more than 8 minutes.

Magyar says: “With this video, all those magical scenes become visible that have captivated me from the very beginning. I also appear in the crowd with my camera taking images of the arriving train.”

For more info about Adam Magyar, visit his very cool website (which includes an ingenious magnifying device to see sharp details), or visit a current exhibition of his prints in Berlin. You can see some of his earlier work in the Lens Culture archives here and here.

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A supposed still image of a moving subway train car. From the series, Stainless, © Adam Magyar. The actual printed image is 1.2 meters high.

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Detail from the image above, © Adam Magyar