Tag Archives: Steven Kasher Gallery

Rock ‘n’ Roll Legend: Jim Marshall’s Musician Portraits

He photographed legends and his pictures have become iconic in American cultural history, but the vast majority of music photographer Jim Marshall’s work has never been seen. Since his death in 2010, Marhsall’s estate has been combing through millions of unpublished negatives. This month, a new book and two gallery shows will debut many never-before-published images from Marshall’s coverage of the Rolling Stones 1972 tour, as well as singular portraits of musicians including Johnny Cash, BB King and Joni Mitchell.

The spectacle and energy of live performances are at the center of many of Marshall’s photographs–but arguably, it is his quieter shots that make his work special. Marshall got the pictures that others couldn’t–sunlight falling on Mick Jagger’s face as he peers out an airplane window, a young Bob Dylan crossing a littered New York sidewalk and Miles Davis leaning back on the ropes of a boxing ring. Taken backstage, in hotel rooms, tour buses and homes, these intimate portraits and moments are the result of Marshall’s insistence on having total access to the subjects he photographed.

“It’s really astounding when you look at the breadth of his work,” said Steven Kasher, of the Steven Kasher Gallery which will show Marshall’s work in July. “Jim was able to penetrate the inner sanctum and be welcomed both on stage and offstage.”

Marshall was also insistent about which of his frames made it to publication. He was a meticulous editor known for being incredibly protective of his work– a quality that helped him to gain the trust of his subjects by never allowing incriminating or embarrassing photographs to be published.

“He had an innate sense and a natural ability to pick a photo that was spot on and that represented the musicians,” said Amelia Davis, Marshall’s longtime assistant. “He knew his work so well and was also friends with the musicians so he really, I think he felt that he knew what would represent and convey them the best.”

Davis is now the manager of Marshall’s estate and has spent the past two years going though his massive archive. The decision to release new work, Davis said, came from her desire to share the pictures, which Marshall referred to as his “children,” that he had not released in his lifetime. “He was the hardest editor on himself,” said Davis. “Going through his work, you find out how incredible it was. I want to celebrate that and share that art of Jim with the world.”

Accompanying the release of the book will be gallery shows on both coasts. An exhibit of the Rolling Stones pictures will be on display at Seattle’s EMP Museum beginning July 14 and on July 5, the Stephen Kasher Gallery in New York will open “The Rolling Stones 1972, Photographs by Jim Marshall.”

The New York gallery show will feature a section dedicated entirely to the Rolling Stones work, made up primarily of images that have never been seen before. A second room will display a survey of the prolific photographers coverage of more than 30 folk, rock and jazz artists. The Kasher gallery will also display a grid of 150 original record covers that feature Marshall’s photography.

Looking forward, Marshall’s estate would like to continue to find and release new collections of work from the archives. “They’re pieces of history,” said Amelia Davis. “It’s important to share that with future generations.”

Jim Marshall: The Rolling Stones and Beyond” will be on display at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York City through September 8, 2012.

The Rolling Stones 1972 will released this month by Chronicle Books.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Legend: Jim Marshall’s Musician Portraits

He photographed legends and his pictures have become iconic in American cultural history, but the vast majority of music photographer Jim Marshall’s work has never been seen. Since his death in 2010, Marshall’s estate has been combing through millions of unpublished negatives. This month, a new book and two gallery shows will debut many never-before-published images from Marshall’s coverage of the Rolling Stones 1972 tour, as well as singular portraits of musicians including Johnny Cash, BB King and Joni Mitchell.

The spectacle and energy of live performances are at the center of many of Marshall’s photographs–but arguably, it is his quieter shots that make his work special. Marshall got the pictures that others couldn’t–sunlight falling on Mick Jagger’s face as he peers out an airplane window, a young Bob Dylan crossing a littered New York sidewalk and Miles Davis leaning back on the ropes of a boxing ring. Taken backstage, in hotel rooms, tour buses and homes, these intimate portraits and moments are the result of Marshall’s insistence on having total access to the subjects he photographed.

“It’s really astounding when you look at the breadth of his work,” said Steven Kasher, of the Steven Kasher Gallery which will show Marshall’s work in July. “Jim was able to penetrate the inner sanctum and be welcomed both on stage and offstage.”

Marshall was also insistent about which of his frames made it to publication. He was a meticulous editor known for being incredibly protective of his work– a quality that helped him to gain the trust of his subjects by never allowing incriminating or embarrassing photographs to be published.

“He had an innate sense and a natural ability to pick a photo that was spot on and that represented the musicians,” said Amelia Davis, Marshall’s longtime assistant. “He knew his work so well and was also friends with the musicians so he really, I think he felt that he knew what would represent and convey them the best.”

Davis is now the manager of Marshall’s estate and has spent the past two years going though his massive archive. The decision to release new work, Davis said, came from her desire to share the pictures, which Marshall referred to as his “children,” that he had not released in his lifetime. “He was the hardest editor on himself,” said Davis. “Going through his work, you find out how incredible it was. I want to celebrate that and share that art of Jim with the world.”

Accompanying the release of the book will be gallery shows on both coasts. An exhibit of the Rolling Stones pictures will be on display at Seattle’s EMP Museum beginning July 14 and on July 5, the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York will open “The Rolling Stones 1972, Photographs by Jim Marshall.”

The New York gallery show will feature a section dedicated entirely to the Rolling Stones work, made up primarily of images that have never been seen before. A second room will display a survey of the prolific photographer’s coverage of more than 30 folk, rock and jazz artists. The Kasher gallery will also display a grid of 150 original record covers that feature Marshall’s photography.

Looking forward, Marshall’s estate would like to continue to find and release new collections of work from the archives. “They’re pieces of history,” said Amelia Davis. “It’s important to share that with future generations.”

Jim Marshall: The Rolling Stones and Beyond” will be on display at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York City through September 8, 2012.

The Rolling Stones 1972 will be released this month by Chronicle Books.

Vivian Maier at Steven Kasher

Untitled (Man with Glasses and Bow Tie), 1969 © Vivian Maier, Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York

On view through May 26, 2012

Steven Kasher Gallery
521 West 23rd Street
New York City, NY

When street photographer Vivian Maier passed away in 2009, she left behind over 120,000 negatives and 2,000 undeveloped rolls of film. Maier made hundreds of thousands of distinguished street photographs throughout New York City and Chicago during her life. Now, three years later, many of her undeveloped rolls of film have been processed and printed.

Vivian Maier: Unseen Images features a selection of the newly developed film, shot in the 1960s and 1970s. Thirty-five prints of the recently discovered work are debuting at the Steven Kasher Gallery.

The new book, Vivian Maier: Street Photographs, edited by John Maloof, is excerpted in Aperture’s latest issue, 207.

Alex Webb, John Gossage @ AIPAD Photography Show

Cover and interior image from The Pond, by John Gossage

To call the AIPAD Photography Show just another art fair would be a tremendous understatement. The annual photography exhibition, now in its thirty-second year, is famously regarded as one of the most important international photography events occurring today. Fittingly so – this year’s event draws seventy-five of the world’s leading fine art photography galleries, presenting a wide range of museum-quality work, including contemporary, modern, and 19th-century photographs, as well as photo-based art, video, and new media.

Join Aperture at the Stephen Daiter Gallery booth, #107, at the AIPAD Photography Show for two very special book signings. On Friday, March 30, John Gossage will be signing copies of his classic monograph, The Pond, reissued by Aperture in 2010, and on March 31, Alex Webb will be signing copies of his books, including his latest, The Suffering of Light (Aperture, 2011).

Beyond Aperture’s happenings at the Stephen Daiter Gallery booth, the show boasts a ticketed Opening Night Gala benefiting inMotion (tickets will be available at the door), and a strong schedule of panel events, featuring conversations with internationally recognized Dutch artist Rineke Dijkstra—in advance of her June 2012 Guggenheim Museum retrospective—as well as a panel titled “How to Collect Photographs: What Collectors Need to Know Now,” moderated by Steven Kasher of Steven Kasher Gallery.

AIPAD Photography Show
Park Avenue Armory
New York, New York

Show Hours and Admission

Thursday, March 29 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, March 30 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 31 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday, April 1 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Show tickets are available for purchase at the Park Avenue Armory during Show hours.

AIPAD Opening Night Gala
Park Avenue Armory
New York, New York

Wednesday, March 28 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Tickets will be available for purchase at the Gala.
You may purchase tickets at the Park Avenue Armory by credit card or cash only.

 

Stephen Shames’ Bronx Boys


© Stephen Shames

Stephen Shames spent over twenty years photographing young boys growing up in the Bronx. Although the project started as a simple photojournalism assignment, Shames quickly became fascinated by the neglected New York suburb and continued to document the vibrant streets. The fruits of his labor are finally being published as a digital monograph titled Bronx Boys (FotoEvidence). The unconventional format provides universal access to readers from around the world, as well as options to zoom in on images for close viewing.

Stephen Shames worked with Aperture for his book The Black Panthers, commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the Party. The Black Panthers Portfolio, an accompanying set of photographs is now on sale! Visit the Black Panthers microsite.

Shames is founder of Lead Uganda, which puts AIDS orphans and child soldiers into school in Uganda. He is represented by Steven Kasher Gallery, New York, and Polaris Images. He currently resides in Brooklyn.