Tag Archives: Spirit Photography

Francesca Woodman Retrospective at the Guggenheim

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Exhibition Photos by David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

The first comprehensive survey of work from the extremely brief but prolific career of American photographer Francesca Woodman (1958-1981) to be shown in North America is now on view at the Guggenheim Museum (through June 13, 2012).

More than thirty years after Woodman’s suicide at the age of 22–often one of the first things people recall about the artist–the exhibition offers an occasion for the “historical reconsideration of her work and its reception.”

Over 120 vintage photographs on view were culled from her estate of 800 prints and over 10,000 negatives, which is managed by her parents. They span her early experimental responses to class assignments completed while she was still enrolled at RISD in the mid-seventies, to the large-scale blueprint studies of her Temple project from 1980. The exhibition also includes six of her recently discovered and rarely seen short videos, as well as two of her artist books.

Her black-and-white images, dark, ethereal and moody, softened and blurred through the use of a long exposure time, are remarkably coherent explorations of herself, and sometimes other women, in very particular environments.

The Times‘ Ken Johnson calls it a “borderline kitschy style, a heady mix of Victorian Gothic, Surrealism and 19th-century spirit photography,” exploring the non-documentary realm of photography in a manner reminiscent of some of her contemporaries, including Cindy Sherman.

They were taken mostly with a medium format 6×6 camera and printed at 8×10″ or smaller, adding a timeless or antique quality, and necessitating a physically intimate viewing experience.

So “strong, particular, personal and tragic,” is her work, British art dealer Anthony d’Offay, who acquired 18 of her prints from the artist’s boyfriend, says in a video interview, “that you have to confront elements of yourself which perhaps sometimes you’ve avoided.”

—–

On Friday, May 18, 2012, the Guggenheim is hosting a symposium on “Art in the 1970s: Through the Lens of Francesca Woodman,” examining the relationship between the still and moving image in Woodman’s and other artists’ production during the 1970s, particularly as associated with Post-Minimalism, performance, and video, organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography.

Francesca Woodman is organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where the exhibition was on view earlier this year. You can find a video walkthrough of that show shot on January 2, 2012 on YouTube.

Read more about Woodman’s “deeply personal photographic revelations” in critic David Levi Strauss’ Between the Eyes: Essays on Photography and Politics (Aperture 2003).

View a slideshow of images from the exhibition at Guggenheim on The New York Times website, after which you can read Ken Johnson’s review of the show.

Exhibition on view:
March 13 – June 13, 2012

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
(at 89th Street)
New York, NY 10128-0173

Do Process: Caitlyn Soldan

This week I am featuring artists exhibiting in Verve Gallery’s Do Process exhibition, showcasing eight unique approaches to the photographic process.

I had the great pleasure of meeting Caitlyn Soldan when I was visiting the Verve Gallery. Not only is Caitlyn a gallery assistant, she is the gallery’s Featured Online Artist this month, a category of gallery representation that debuts emerging artists. Caitlyn very kindly shared a variety of the work from the exhibition, pulling from drawers to explain the varied processes used in the work. The images Caitlyn is exhibiting is entitled Thin Veils, using the Mordançage process. In the work, she takes self-portraits using a pinhole camera. Caitlyn takes her cues from Victorian spirit photography – portraits with spirits. Thus, the images in this exhibition are Caitlyn’s visual improvisations of ghosts, spirits, and hauntings. Caitlyn’s work is ethereal, esoteric, and allegorical.

Caitlyn was born in Chicago and graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design in June 2011 with a BFA in Photography. Her work explores themes of history, memory and time. Caitlyn prefers working with film and alternative processes but also enjoys exploring the possibilities of combining historical processes with new technology. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States and France. Caitlyn presently resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Mordançage is a 20th century process created by Jean-Pierre, which is based on a 19th century process known as bleach-etch. Bleach-etch is a reversal process for film negatives. The process involves stripping away the darkest parts of the emulsion of a silver gelatin print. This image transformation creates a relief, or a raised area on the print. Water is used to float the delicate silver emulsion on the image so as to rearrange it and dry it back down onto the print. The end result is a one-of-a-kind and thus unique photographic image. The artist chose the Mordançage process for this series because it enhances the themes of time, decay, and mortality in her work. The process also gives the images mysterious and otherworldly qualities, separating them from reality.

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution @ Daniel Blau Gallery, London

We are getting very excited here in the studio about this upcoming exhibition of vintage, anonymous, vernacular and spirit photography,also including works by Fratelli Alinari,Cecil Beaton, Rene Barthelemy, Emil Cadoo,Arthur Conan Doyle, JH Engstrom, Walker Evans, Michael Grieve, Bill Jacobson, Fritz Lang, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Floris Neususs, Arnold Newman, Diane Pernet, Leni Riefenstahl, Jeffrey Silverthorne, Edmund Teske, U.S. Army Picture Corps et al. assistir filmes online .

“They are moving because of their phantom condition; every act they execute may be their last; there is not a face that is not on the verge of dissolving like a face in a dream.” Jorge Luis Borges

Daniel Blau Gallery, London will be presenting a unique set of images that embody a theme particularly relevant to current artistic and cultural practice: that of the haunted, the blurred and the dissolved. To exemplify these themes this exhibition will feature vintage prints as well as more recent explorations in photography and its often-dissolute processes. In homage to the alchemy and chemistry of photography, this show will illustrate fire, smoke, the spirit, the x-ray, blur and motion, decay and the photogram. Like a series of dark objects and entities trapped behind the framing of glass, the gallery space becomes a chapel to the haunted history of the photographic medium.

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution
2 September 8 October 2011
Opening: 1 Sept, 6-10pm
Daniel Blau Gallery, London

To coincide with this, the gallery will be hosting talks and lectures that relate to the concept of the exhibition. If you would like to attend one or all of the following events, please RSVP to: london(at)danielblau(dot)com Tickets are 5, payable on arrival at the gallery. All the events open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start. 51 Hoxton Square, London N16PB.

Tuesday 6 September: Talks

Jeffrey Silverthorne in conversation with Brad Feuerhelm / Michael Grieve in conversation with Aaron Schuman.

Tuesday 20 September: Lecture

David Bate presents some ideas related to the exhibition with a following discussion.

Not to be missed!

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution @ Daniel Blau Gallery, London

We are getting very excited here in the studio about this upcoming exhibition of vintage, anonymous, vernacular and spirit photography,also including works by Fratelli Alinari,Cecil Beaton, Rene Barthelemy, Emil Cadoo,Arthur Conan Doyle, JH Engstrom, Walker Evans, Michael Grieve, Bill Jacobson, Fritz Lang, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Floris Neususs, Arnold Newman, Diane Pernet, Leni Riefenstahl, Jeffrey Silverthorne, Edmund Teske, U.S. Army Picture Corps et al.

“They are moving because of their phantom condition; every act they execute may be their last; there is not a face that is not on the verge of dissolving like a face in a dream.” Jorge Luis Borges

Daniel Blau Gallery, London will be presenting a unique set of images that embody a theme particularly relevant to current artistic and cultural practice: that of the haunted, the blurred and the dissolved. To exemplify these themes this exhibition will feature vintage prints as well as more recent explorations in photography and its often-dissolute processes. Philadelphia auto body repair . In homage to the alchemy and chemistry of photography, this show will illustrate fire, smoke, the spirit, the x-ray, blur and motion, decay and the photogram. Like a series of dark objects and entities trapped behind the framing of glass, the gallery space becomes a chapel to the haunted history of the photographic medium.

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution
2 September 8 October 2011
Opening: 1 Sept, 6-10pm
Daniel Blau Gallery, London

To coincide with this, the gallery will be hosting talks and lectures that relate to the concept of the exhibition. If you would like to attend one or all of the following events, please RSVP to: london(at)danielblau(dot)com Tickets are 5, payable on arrival at the gallery. All the events open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start. 51 Hoxton Square, London N16PB.

Tuesday 6 September: Talks

Jeffrey Silverthorne in conversation with Brad Feuerhelm / Michael Grieve in conversation with Aaron Schuman.

Tuesday 20 September: Lecture

David Bate presents some ideas related to the exhibition with a following discussion.

Not to be missed!