Tag Archives: South Sudan

Photo News – Hotshoe magazine for contemporary photography Dec/Jan out now in print and as app

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Featuring: Leigh Ledare testing the boundaries of relationships, sex and love in Double Bind; Alinka Echeverria’s documentary on the birth of South Sudan; Diana Scherer‘s Nurture Studies; Asger Carlsen‘s Hester; and Fleur van Dodewaard in Crude Metaphors. Plus reviews of Alec Soth‘s Looking for Love, 1996, Klein + Moriyama at Tate Modern, and the Nikon D800. As well as, A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York, a round up of the latest books, exhibition listings, news and more.

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Alan Spearman’s film of the streets of South Memphis ‘As I Am’, Viviane Sassen’s ode to her muse Roxane and a review of this year’s Paris Photo. Plus enriched portfolios, clickable exhibition listings and much, much more.

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Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Alec Soth, Alinka Echeverria, Asger Carlsen, Diana Scherer, Hotshoe App, Hotshoe App Edition, HotShoe magazine, Leigh Ledare

Witness, a film on HBO tomorrow night

I happened to be in a hotel room in Colorado, watching The Bang Bang Club when I received an e-mail about a 4-part movie presented on HBO tomorrow night. Links backlinks blog comments .  


Witness: Juarez, a four-part documentary series from award-winning filmmaker Michael Mann debuts this Monday, November 5th at 9:00p.m.ET/PT. The film follows combat photographer Eros Hoagland as he explores Juarez, Mexico, the “murder capital of the world” where drug violence has left over 10,000 dead.

Presented in four parts  JuarezLibyaSouth Sudan and Rio  Witness focuses on three determined photojournalists: Eros Hoagland, who explores the gang- and drug-related violence in both Juarez, Mexico and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Michael Christopher Brown, who chronicles escalating ethnic tensions in the wake of Muammar Gaddafis ouster last year in Libya; and Vronique de Viguerie, who follows the Arrow Boys and their struggle against General Kony in South Sudan. Between these three, their photos have appeared in TimeNewsweekThe New York TimesThe AtlanticParis MatchThe Guardian and many other publications.

Cédric Gerbehaye’s Belgium: A Country in Flux

Photographer Cédric Gerbehaye has spent the past nine years working on long-term documentary projects, often in underreported regions including South Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). A project in the latter country, which opened Gerbehaye’s eyes to the long and conflicted relationship the DRC has with its former colonial occupier, eventually led him to turn his lens back home, to Belgium.

In June 2010, Gerbehaye’s own country fell into turmoil and transition when the two leading political parties in the country – the New Flemish Alliance and the Socialist Party – were unable to reach a consensus on a coalition to form a new government. Belgium broke the record for being a nation without a government for a consecutive period of time, clocking in at 541 days before a new Prime Minister was appointed in December 2011. It was a period of immense political and social tension for the people of Belgium—a country comprised mainly of two distinct cultural groups.

“The idea of a separation of the country was more present than ever,” Gerbehaye said. “Belgium is a state assembling two people which initially have nothing in common—they speak different languages, they do not have the same economy and vote in opposite ways.”

The Flemish-speaking north and French-speaking south largely keep to their separate sides, differentiated by a linguistic border that slices the country from east to west.

Seeing the issues he had spent so many years exploring abroad bubble to the surface at home, Gerbehaye set out to document these two communities and the friction that is created from people who separate themselves as distinct groups that gather together under the same flag. The resulting series — simply titled Belgium — digs into the tensions inherent in the mixing of these communities and to the new identities that emerge from such co-mingling. The first chapter of the work, which was completed during this spring and summer, was produced for the International Festival Photoreporter in Saint Brieuc and will be on view from Oct. 19 to Nov. 11.

Weaving together images of workers on the brink of losing their jobs with countrymen engaged in religious traditions, Gerbehaye sought to convey the social and political dynamics within the small nation’s borders. But Belgium also serves as an exploration of physical space, and the photographer zig-zagged the country in order to document steelworkers in the French-speaking region and fishermen in the Flemish-speaking north. For work grappling with what it means to be Belgian, viewing the country from its outer limits was key.  “For the fishermen, it was a way of speaking of a job that is disappearing now, but it’s also a way to give some limits to the work, to give a border,” Gerbehaye said. “They are in the sea, at the border of the country, on the coast of the country.”

Gerbehaye does not attempt to make a definitive comparison of his country’s two linguistic regions. Rather, he seeks through his photos of Catholic devotees, night revelers, and farmers — ordinary Belgians living their everyday lives — to create a “partial and personal inventory of the human territory.”

 Cédric Gerbehaye is a photographer with VU. LightBox previously featured Gerbehaye’s photographs of Birth and Death in Sudan.

Pictures of the Week: October 5 —12

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From the Taliban shooting of a 14-year-old activist in Pakistan to the vice-presidential debate in Kentucky to angry protests against the German Chancellor’s visit in Greece and a human tower in Spain, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Articles | October 2012

We haven’t had an Articles post on the site for a long time, so some of the links are as old as from the past summer, but hopefully still relevant to those who haven’t yet read them… This first one’s recent though…interesting article in this week’s Newsweek by Sarah A. Topol on young rookie freelance journalists working in war zones….The main photo seen on the spread below is by Ben Lowy by the way (who is seen with Nicole Tung in the photo on the right), although he obviously isn’t one of the people discussed in the article…

Sarah A. Topol: Rookie Freelancers Risking Their Lives To Cover The Arab Spring (Newsweek)

Somewhat related perhaps… Action packed trailer to 4 part HBO documentary series on conflict photographers: Witness. Surprisingly, I could find very little info on the series online… It doesn’t even appear to have a website… I recognised three photographers in the trailer… Michael Christopher Brown, Eros Hoagland, and Veronique de Viguerie…There are four episodes though:  Libya, South Sudan, Juarez, and Rio… so perhaps there’s a fourth photographer featured, but I don’t know..

Witness : HBO documentary series on conflict photographers (YouTube)

New York Times correspondent Simon Romero on Tomas Munita in Lens blog…

Photo © Tomas Munita

Simon Romero: Losing Fear and Learning to See : on Tomas Munita (NYT Lens)

Magnum Photos CEO on the agency’s new strategy.

Magnum Photos’ new focus: online, online and online (BJP) ‘Magnum Photos’ activities used to be divided into two categories – new work and licensing – respectively dubbed M1 and M2. Now the agency’s CEO, Giorgio Psacharopulo, is pushing Magnum’s online activities as part of a new strategy.’

Photography writer Mary Panzer on the contemporary role of professional photojournalists using Magnum Photos as an example.

Mary Panzer: Magnum Irrelevant? (WSJ) ‘What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?’

Photo © William Klein

The month in photography (Observer) ‘The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Lise Sarfati, William Klein, Luc Delahaye and Lucas Foglia.’

Looking at the Land From the Comfort of Home (Lightbox)

Photo © Michael Nichols

Anatomy of an iPad App: A Photo Archive That’s Also an App (PDN) National Geographic photographer Michael Nichols launched an iPad app of his work that can be downloaded for $3.99.

6Mois: Biannual French magazine offers different approach to photography (BJP)

Hipstamatic angst, Instagram anxiety: time to move the conversation forward (David Campbell blog)

Laurence Butet-Roch: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: How photographers can benefit from social networks (BJP)

Introducing the six masters and 12 participants of the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Couple of new photo blogs from the Middle East…

Photo blog by The National (Abu Dhabi)

Panorama by Egypt Independent newspaper

Al-Akhbar photo blog by Al-Akhbar newspaper in Lebanon

What sounds like an amazing exhibition on war photography coming up at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Total War: A New Look at Conflict Photography (New Yorker) ‘In November, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will unveil an exhibition on war photography unprecedented in scale and ambition. The origins of “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” can be traced back to the museum’s acquisition—ten years ago—of the first known print of Joe Rosenthal’s famous photograph of the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima.’

Amazing five-volume Gordon Parks collection from Steidl… which I’m sure I can’t afford… I’ve been a big Gordon Parks fan ever since I read his autobiography.

Photo © Gordon Parks

Five-Volume Collection of Gordon Parks’s Work by Steidl (NYT Lens)

James Estrin: In an Age of Likes, Commonplace Images Prevail (NYT Lens)

Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless? (PhotoShelter)

Photo © Maciej Dakowicz

Sean O’Hagan: Cardiff After Dark by Maciej Dakowicz (Guardian) ‘The Polish-born photographer’s epic study of Cardiff nightlife is a hymn to camaraderie and pleasure-seeking’

Reviewed: The Latin American Photobook (BJP)

Behind the Cover: Bill Clinton Photographed by Mark Seliger (Lightbox)

Dan Winters in a Thousand Words: An Ode to a Friend by Nick Offerman (Lightbox)

Photo © Robert Flora/Corbis

Malcolm X as Visual Strategist (NYT Lens)

Peter Dench: In Conversation With Homer Sykes (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: Online Photography Workshops (BJP)

Colvin’s last passport was issued on December 20, 2005, four years after she lost her left eye to shrapnel in Sri Lanka. Here Colvin wears her signature eye patch.

The Passport to Prove It: A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career (Vanity Fair) ‘Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Times in 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February.’

Charlize Theron in talks to play war reporter Marie Colvin (Guardian) ‘Oscar-winning actor has signed on as co-producer for biopic of late Sunday Times war correspondent’

Photo © Henri Cartier-Bresson

Martine Franck obituary (Guardian) Martine Franck Legacy (Lightbox)  Martine Franck, Documentary Photographer, Dies at 74 (NYT)

Dan White ~ 1965-2012 (Panos)

Photographer holds festival of hope amid Aleppo fighting (CNN)

Swedes Schibbye and Persson ‘pardoned’ by Ethiopia (BBC)

Girl from Sebastião Salgado photograph found (DVA Foto)

Two-year probation for Shepard Fairey in image infringement case (BJP)

Kodak to sell off film division (BJP)

MediaStorm Spring 2013 Internship (MediaStorm)

The Guardian relaunches its Eyewitness photography app (BJP)

Carlyle Group to Buy Getty Images for $3.3 Billion (NYT)

Bad news for Reuters (The Independent)

Hollywood celebs and their Leicas…

Leica Cameras, Favored by Celebrities (NYT)

Who Can Improve on Nature? Magazine Editors and Photographers on Retouching Photos (NYT)

Hot off the press: The newsprint as a medium for photographers (BJP)

I AM The Boss, 1982 correspondence between Annie Leibovitz and Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner (Letters of Note)

The most-viewed photo of all time?

Photo © Charles O’Rear

Is This the Most-Viewed Photo of All Time? (Mashable)

7 Lighting Tips for Shooting Video with Digital SLRs (PDN)

Advertising Standards Authority bans two Channel 4 ‘gypsy’ ads (BJP) ‘The ASA has banned two Channel 4 ads used to promote its hit show, My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding. BJP speaks to the author of the photographs featured in the ads’

Greg Funnell: Assignment: A look at the thought process behind a shoot (Photographer’s blog)

Dos and Don’ts: Writing a Photographer Bio (PetaPixel)

To finish off… 52 Worst Photoshop Mistakes In Magazines

Tearsheet of The Day | Refugees’ shoes in South Sudan by Shannon Jensen in Newsweek

Shannon Jensen has a terrific work in Newsweek Int’l 3 September 2012 issue from South Sudan. Jensen travelled in the country June-July this year, and photographed shoes belonging to refugees who had travelled by foot  across the border from Sudan’s Blue Nile state over to neighbouring South Sudan to escape Khartoum government’s military campaign against Southern liberation movement.

Newsweek has dedicated four pages for the series showing overall 18 pairs of shoes. The photos are accompanied by a short text  providing background, written solely by the photographer*.

“How to represent a journey in an image?” asks Jensen in the opening sentence of the piece titled ‘A Long Walk’. I think she found a pretty good way to do just that. The idea and its execution reminded me little of Alejandro Cartagena’s Car Poolers.

You can see Jensen’s photos on the Newsweek website here.

Photos © Shannon Jensen

Shannon Jensen is an American photographer based between USA and East Africa. She is part of  Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent.

*In June I wrote about Newsweek often showing photo projects solely accompanied by photographer’s text. See here.

Pictures of the Week: June 29 – July 5

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From South Sudan’s refugee crisisand Spain’s historic Euro 2012 win tothe U.S. proveedor factura electrnica . Olympic gymnastics team trials and a polar bear cub’s piggyback, TIMEs photo department presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week: April 20 — April 27

From the first round of voting in the French presidential elections and the crisis between Sudan and South Sudan to the continuing eruption of Mt. Etna and a plane crash in Pakistan, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.