Tag Archives: Solo Exhibitions

Europe Week: Margaret de Lange

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares the last of her European selections today with Margaret de Lange. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts. It’s been a wonderful week!

Margaret de Lange lives and works in Norway. She studied photography in Oslo. She has held solo exhibitions among other places in: Tarragona, Brussels, Paris, New York, Stockholm . She was recognized for Best portfolio at the Photo Festival in Arles, France, and with an Honorable mention by the Leica Oskar Barnack Award. She has published two books, Daughters and Surrounded by no one with Trolleybooks (London) .

In her series entitled, Daughters, Margaret presents black and white photographs taken of her two daughters during the summers of their childhood. Though the project began in 1993 and continued through 2002, it wasn’t until both daughters were old enough to grant their permission did de Lange take the step of exhibiting the work.

The images depict the two girls enjoying their summers out of doors, barefoot and often bare-bodied, in a dark and grainy, high-contrast style. In the photographs, the children seem to be a part of the nature around them, with dirt and grass clinging to knees and feet, with hoods of animal skin; they become like the creatures of Scandinavian folklore that, as de Lange explains, “were said to appear at twilight, and were always beautiful, but often evil as well.” And so we view the daughters, captured as they linger in a hazy half-darkness, in that time between day and night and an age between child and adult, exploring, discovering, and experiencing all of those little adventures which amount to growing up. These “creatures” exhibit their initiated ways through various little clues: dead birds hanging from string, bold stares from beneath fury capes. All together, the effect is unabashedly dark and earthy, yet calm and elegantly matter-of-fact.

The images, de Lange points out, are representative of a typical Norwegian childhood during the brief but sweet summer months. However, the way in which the images are rendered, with deeply encroaching shadows and heavy grain, pushes the subject into more of a dream realm that speaks more of the meandering experience of these pre-adolescent girls and a world that is very much their own.

As for the daughters, the photographs represent a precious conservation of memory. “She has preserved random pieces of our childhood, and we treasure those moments” says Jannicke de Lange, speaking for herself and her younger sister, Catherine.

Matt Austin

Chicago photographer/artist, Matt Austin, has created a body of work, WAKE, that is a narrative about tragic moments in his family’s life.  This project is about to become part of an experiment in the sharing of work.
Matt received the Illinois Artist Council Grant to produce an edition of 10 of the WAKE books. Each copy of WAKE is made up of a handmade clamshell box that houses four hardcover books and a ledger. On October 27, the edition will be distributed to ten people familiar to Matt, but don’t personally know one other. Their responsibility will be to read the book, sign the ledger like a library card, and register their book number location by zip code on a corresponding website.The reader will then decide who receives their copy of the book next, pass it on to the next person, and so on. The website will provide a visual for where each of the 10 books are in the world as well as a waiting list platform for requesting a book to be sent to you.

Matt received his BFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago  and is teaching for the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Matt is the co-founder of the open digital lab LATITUDE (be sure to explore this amazing site), staff member of ACRE Artist Residency, co-founder of the art installation project known as TAIST, and a member of the pedagogical experiment The Mountain was a Gift. His photographs have been exhibited widely, including exhibitions at the John Michael Kohler Art Center, Catherine Edelman Gallery, NEXT: Invitational Exhibition of Emerging Art, the MDW Art Fair, including solo exhibitions at Johalla Projects and the University of Notre Dame. Soon, he will be re-releasing the second edition of “/” with EJ Hill for their two-person exhibition SLOW DANCE at RAID Projects in L.A. this November.

WAKE is currently on exhibition at the John Michael Kohler Art Center in Sheboygan, WI in the show The Kids Are All Right.  The exhibition runs through January where it will then travel to the Weatherspoon Art Museum in Greensboro, NC and the Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, MA throughout 2013.

WAKE is a photographic and literary narrative that presents my account of several tragic moments regarding my family over the past 4 years. The story begins with e-mails between my dad and I exchanged over the days that followed a violent eviction from his apartment and my simultaneous arrival in Ireland to study abroad. 

In the following chapters, WAKE gives an account of three family deaths over a short few months, drawing comparisons between economic failure and physical mortality. While providing one of many stories of a family’s experience with economic devastation, the book poses an optimistic perspective of learned appreciation through difficulty.

Sarah Palmer, The Bomb (Also) is a Flower

Sarah Palmer, The Bomb (Also) is a Flower

Sarah Palmer

The Bomb (Also) is a Flower,
, 2010
From the As A Real House series
Website – SarahPalmerPhotography.com

Sarah Palmer was born in San Francisco, and lives in Brooklyn. She received her MFA in Photography, Video and Related Media from School of Visual Arts in 2008, where she was awarded an Aaron Siskind Scholarship, and her BA from Vassar College in 1999. Her work has been exhibited in the US and in Europe, at the Center for Photography at Woodstock, in satellite exhibitions at the New York Photo Festival in 2009 and 2011, and at Foam_fotografiemuseum, Amsterdam, among others. Her photographs and writing have been published in print and online journals and exhibition catalogs. She was awarded the 2011 Aperture Portfolio Prize2011 Aperture Portfolio Prize in spring 2012 and has had solo exhibitions at the Wild Project, in 2010, and at Aperture Gallery in fall 2012. She is on the full-time photography faculty at Parsons The New School for Design and the Board of Directors of Rooftop Films.

Eric Breitenbach

Today, and leading up to and after November 6th, LENSCRATCH will be featuring work that looks at our election process. 

We start today with work by Eric Breitenbach, who has created a series, Election 2012.

Eric  has been a still photographer for over thirty years and a filmmaker for more than fifteen.

His still photographs have appeared in such publications as The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, Details, Doubletake, Information Week, Labor’s Heritage, Essence, and Orlando magazines. He has exhibited widely. In 2012 he had solo exhibitions of his photography at The Third Eye Gallery in Varanasi, India, and at Florida School of The Arts in Palatka, Florida. Eric Breitenbach is also a Senior Professor at The Southeast Center For Photographic Studies at Daytona State College, teaching courses in photography, film, and video.

ELECTION 2012 
 For as long as I’ve been a photographer I’ve been compelled to make pictures of people. My goal is to discover something universal about a person—something viewers can recognize and even identify with. The trick is to then depict that successfully in a photograph. In early 2011, as events surrounding the 2012 presidential election began to unfold, like many Americans I was astonished at the heat of the political rhetoric. It seemed as if angry extremists were running the show.

Dismayed but still curious, I began to attend and photograph campaign rallies, political conventions, memorial services, group meetings, demonstrations, festivals, and other politically relevant events. There were thousands at the largest of these, sometimes less than a dozen at the smallest.

My goal wasn’t to document or explain anything; that, I think, is best left to the journalists. 

I set out with my usual strategy in mind—to attend, observe and make photographs. The role may be considered to be like that of an explorer, a finder and provider of artifacts that might one day be useful in comprehending, in this case, the cultural, social, and political mindset of 2012 America.

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski

Attachment,
Montreal, 2006
From the Anna & Eve series
Website – ViktoriArt.com

Viktoria Sorochinski is a Ukrainian-born artist who has lived and studied in Russia, Israel, and Canada prior to settling in New York City, where she acquired her Masters of Fine Arts in 2008. Since 2001 she has participated in various group and solo exhibitions and international photography festivals in Canada, USA, France, Italy, Russia, China, Georgia and Argentina. She is also a finalist and winner of several international photography competitions and awards including Lucie Award – IPA (Discovery of the Year), Magenta Foundation's Flash Forward, PDN Photo Annual, Voices Off Arles, ONWARD, Review Santa Fe, Descubrimientos PHE, BluePrint Fellowship, and Encuentros Abiertos. Her work is widely published in internationally acclaimed magazines, among which are British Journal of Photography, EYEMAZING, NY Times, PDN, GUP, Le Monde, BLINK Magazine, THE PHOTO/ARTVAS, Planeando Sobre BUE, AZART Photo, and many others, as well as in web portals worldwide.

Review Santa Fe: Keliy Anderson-Staley

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  


Keliy Anderson-Staley was raised “off the grid” in Maine, received a BA from Hampshire College in Massachusetts and an MFA from Hunter College in New York and currently lives and teaches in Arkansas. She has been making wet plate collodion tintypes for eight years.

Her new project, [Hyphen] Americans, refers to the hyphenated
character of American identities (Irish-American, African-American,
etc.), while only emphasizing the shared American identity.
These portraits compose a broadly inclusive portrait of
America. “With each portrait I hope to capture a powerful likeness, which
I then title only with a first name. Each portrait is revealing but
anonymous. Each is also uniquely representative of an individual but not
of a particular group. Therefore, although the heritage of each
individual might be inferred from assumptions we make about features and
costumes, the viewer is encouraged to suspend the kind of thinking that
would traditionally assist in decoding these images in the context of
American identity politics.”


Keliy has been awarded a Howard Foundation Fellowship , Light Work residency and fellowship, New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Puffin Grant, and a Bronx Museum AIM residency. Solo exhibitions of her tintype portraits have been installed at the Light Work Gallery in Syracuse, NY, the Palitz Gallery in NYC, the Southeast Museum of Photography, the California Museum of Photography, John Cleary Gallery in Houston and a number of university galleries around the country. Keliy has exhibited widely arcoss the US.

Keliy will have a  “tintype portrait booth” set up at both the Chicago expo through the Catherine Edelman Gallery September 20-23rd and in New Haven in October. (Sittings are free and open to the public) She will also have work at the DC Fine Art Photography Fair in Washington DC, from October 5-7th at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery.

[Hyphen] Americans is a series of tintype portraits made with chemistry mixed according to nineteenth-century recipes, period brass lenses and wooden view cameras. Composed of thousands of portraits, the project is a broadly diverse collection of American faces. Each individual in the project–identified only by a first name–defiantly asserts his or her selfhood, resisting any imposed or external categorizing system we might bring to these images.

At once contemporary and timeless, these portraits raise questions about our place as individuals in history, and the role that photographic technologies and the history of photography have played in  defining identity.

Yigal Feliks

Ninth generation Israeli photographer, Yigal Feliks, has created several compelling bodies of work that grew out of his experience of serving in the Israeli Army.  He brought his photographic eye and fine art sensibilities to war, and the result is a way at looking at military life with a unique perspective.  I am featuring two bodies of work, War Games and Portraits, each capturing different interpretations of army service.  In War Games, the use of selective focus allows us to look at war from a child’s perception, making real soldiers into toy soldiers and combat into an afternoon activity. His work focuses on themes relating to the changing Israeli space alongside to an investigation of digital influence on photographic imagery.

Yigal received a B.F.A in photography,
from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and his work 
has been shown in solo exhibitions in
Israel and France. His great grand father had the first color Lithography printing
house in Israel, based in Jerusalem.
Today Yigal lives in Haifa and has a digital printing studio 
which specializes on the photographic
print. Yigal is married to Shirie and father
to Yuval, Gil and Ariel.

As married professionals with a family, my serving
in the army reserve service once a year is a unique Israeli experience. I serve with of a group of men of
different ages who are defined by the army as an organic tank

unit . We are detached from our daily routine, our place
in society and our families. We put on a uniform, live together in the same conditions, eat the same food
and work together at the same activity. In our hearts we share the same naïve hope that the next
generation will not go through the same training each one of us needs to burden, and simply live their daily lives
without fear.



War Games
The photographs show the incongruity of our lives
in which we must take part in this kind of activity.

Portraits
The photographs show men from a combat unit of
which I am a part. At my side are veterans that finished their duty and now they volunteer, assisting young
soldiers for whom this is their first reserve service. A mixture of ethnic groups, social classes, thoughts
and beliefs blend into one structure that has its own dynamics which enables it to function.

Nicole Jean Hill, Highway 14

Nicole Jean Hill, Highway 14

Nicole Jean Hill

Highway 14,
Ucross, Wyoming, 2011
From the Artifacts & Incidents series
Website – NicoleJeanHill.com

Nicole Jean Hill was born in Toledo, Ohio. She received her BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her photographs have been exhibited in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Australia, including solo exhibitions at the Blue Sky Gallery (Portland, OR), Gallery 44 (Toronto, ON) and The Front (New Orleans, LA). She has been an artist-in-residence at the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming, The Center for Land Use Interpretation in Wendover, Utah, and the Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, OR. Hill currently resides in Eureka, CA and is an associate professor in the department of art at Humboldt State University.