Tag Archives: Solo Exhibition

SW Regional SPE: Vivian Keulards

Sharing photographers that I met at the SW Regional SPE Conference hosted by the Center of Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado….

Meeting Vivian Keulards in Colorado was a complete pleasure and her wonderful projects set the tone for a new friendship and fan club. It’s hard not to respond to an image like the one below, simply a portrait of a neighbor, but obviously there was more to the story from her series, 80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe

And then there was her adoration of redheads, in her series, Elusive Beauty…

Vivian was born and raised in the Netherlands and currently lives in Evergreen, Colorado. In 2009 she received a degree from the Photo Academy in Amsterdam and she gained a Master Degree in Communication Science at the KUN University (Nijmegen, Netherlands). She also participated in inspiring Master classes of Carl de Keyzer, Rob Hornstra and more.

Vivian was a Critical Mass finalist and she was selected for the NEW Dutch Photography Talent book (by the makers of the magazine GUP) this year. Her work is part of several public collections and the work has been exhibitied widely.  Six of her portraits from the series Elusive Beauty are currently on display at the Ogden Museum in New Orleans and her  project 80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe will open in January 2013 as a solo exhibition at CPAC in Denver.

Elusive Beauty 

They will likely be extinct in the next 100 years: red headed children. Only one percent of the human population carries this unique red head gene. 


 For years now those children take my breath away; the orange/red hair, their pale skin with clusters of freckles and their bright light eyes. At times they even seem to be translucent. When they look into my eyes I’m staggered. Sometimes I even feel intimidated. Their fragile and sensitive appearance is often accompanied by their very powerful and strong willed character. I experienced it myself and this surprising combination makes them even more exclusive to me.

I know by saying this all out loud, a lot of them feel offended. They don’t want to be examined as special, different or exotic. And they don’t want to be generalized, stereo-typed or even fetishized. They are a group with a history of bullying, discrimination and abuse, all because of their looks. So I understand their skepticism towards me.

In my photos I create scenery where their strong looks come to life and capture the moment where you can feel their power. I desperately want to show that red hair is admirable and desirable, instead of a reason to be treated differently.

80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe

In 2010, I moved from The Netherlands to Evergreen, Colorado, for three years. My new home environment is very different, confusing, and intriguing at the same time. Of course I grew up with watching American movies, shows, and videoclips. And of course, in real life up here, I sometimes recognize similar places and people from those fiction scenes. In truth it feels like I’m living in a constructed reality show – the fiction and the reality confuse me. More important, I fear my new life will fade like a dream when I go back home…that all this will be forgotten. 

Europe Week: Oleg Videnin

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, today with Oleg Videnin. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts. 
Oleg Videnin was born in Bryansk (Russia) in 1963. Trained as a forestry engineer, he eventually worked in newspapers, radio, and television, becoming a member of the Russian Union of Journalists. His childhood interest in photography grew into a full-fledged passion in the late 1990s, his work has since gained international recognition. Oleg has had solo exhibition in Russia, Serbia, Australia, and the United States, and has been featured in numerous magazines. His photographs are included in the collections of the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow, as well as in private collections in Russia and abroad.
Oleg lives with his family in Bryansk.
Russians
“I was going round the world searching for an interesting place, when I realized that the place that I was in was already interesting.” Emmet Gowin 

Jacqueline states: When I first saw Oleg’s work I was riveted by the strong connection that exists between him and the people he photographs. Like an August Sander, Oleg has been meticulously photographing his region, his town, his people and his neighbours. Young and old, men and women, jubilant and despondent, communities and outsiders… his work is very much local and documental. Yet it is the universal dimension and the emotional quality of his portraits that keeps me coming back to his images….

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters

Noh, Chadian Refugee,
London, 2011
Website – KatePeters.co.uk

Kate Peters, born Coventry, England in 1980, gained a BA (Hons) in Photography at Falmouth College of Arts, Cornwall in 2002 before moving to London where she is currently based. Her work has been exhibited worldwide and can regularly be seen in publications including Monocle, FT Weekend, The Independent New Review, Guardian Weekend, and The Telegraph. Her portrait of Julian Assange, the founder of Wikileaks, was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in December 2010 and included in the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize exhibition in November 2011. Kate’s first solo exhibition Stranger than Fiction was at the hpgrp Gallery in New York in February 2011. She has participated in numerous group shows including the Format Photography Festival in Derby, UK and the Darmstadter Tage der Fotografie in Germany. Several of her portraits form part of the permanent collection at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith

Hong Kong Island,
China, 2012
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Brighton Photo Fringe Photo Stroll Part One – Jinkyun Ahn, The Photocopy Club and The Unphotographable with Farnham student Catherine Symons

Trying to get work together for the Brighton Photo Fringe with Tri-pod and our work-in-progress show IS THAT IT (more to come later), plus moving and looking for work has been full on.

I’m now based in Brighton, for the time being, and while I find my feet, I asked Farnham student Catherine Symons, who attended the press view, to cover it for the blog. It’s great to get another perspective, let go and allow someone else the space to preview the shows…

So, I now hand over to Catherine for the first of two posts.

 ON THE SURFACE OF IMAGES – JINKYUN AHN

Confrontation 1 from On The Surface Of Images © Jinkyun Ahn. Photo courtesy of the artist and The Phoenix Brighton

On Saturday 6 October the Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 was launched, starting at Phoenix Brighton. Phoenix Brighton is used this year to showcase OPEN 2012.  Over 100 submissions were received and On The Surface Of Images by Korean photographer Jinkyun Ahn was selected as the winner by Clare Grafik, Susanna Brown and Oliver Chanarin.

Photographer Jinkyun Ahn in conversation with Afshin Dehkordi, Photograph by Catherine Symons

Ahn’s first major solo exhibition On The Surface Of Images shows his photographic work on the subject of his parents, looking at the theme of mortality. “The empty plot that my parents prepared for their after-life is an image of death that will be fixed eternally in the landscape, as well as, in my mind.” From the artist’s statement.

Photographs by Catherine Symons

Walking around the exhibition, there is the experience of the different elements and processes that Ahn went through in his mind when making this body of work. He comments on the distance and isolation he experienced through showing the fragmenting of his parents with their faces darkened or dismembered in different ways.

On The Surface Of Images runs until 18 November.

THE PHOTOCOPY CLUB

Photos Catherine Symons.

The fifth exhibition from The Photocopy Club is on show at The Phoenix Brighton. The Brighton-based company opened in 2011 with the aim to have six bi-monthly open submission exhibitions. The idea behind this organization is to take photographs from the internet and instead put them into the public’s hands.

100 photographers work is displayed on chipboard, including envelopes and notes sent in, which adds a rawness to the project. Bringing together a variety of different images, the aesthetic of the work allows the tactile nature of the photograph to come back into play and for the work to be disseminated to a wider audience.

This show is followed by the exhibition DUO hosted by WEARELUCKY/HOLYGHOST – a show looking at the work of four pairs of young photographers. Details of their next submission exhibition can be found at The Photocopy Club deadline 18 November.

UNPHOTOGRAPHABLE – MICHAEL DAVID MURPHY & THE ENTENTE

© Michael David Murphy & The Entente

Brighton Photo Fringe designers, Michael David Murphy and The Entente invited members of the public to contribute to their work, whereby they take elements of the unphotographable and combine this with text.

Photo by Catherine Symons

“Opportunities missed.  Simple failures.  Occasions when I wished I’d taken the picture, or not forgotten the camera, or had been brave enough to click the shutter.” Michael David Murphy.

The result is a graphical representation of what would have been and is achieved through combining bold black text with coloured symbols. The text and symbols give the viewer a snippet of the whole image and engaging the viewer’s imagination to allow them to determine the image that they would like to see.

Allow your imagination to run free with this thought-provoking installation.

All shows at The Phoenix Brighton. Open Tues-Sun 11:00-17:00.

Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Festivals Tagged: Afshin Dehkordi, Catherine Symons, Jinkyun Ahn, Michael David Murphy, On The Surface Of Images, Phoenix Brighton, The Entente, The Photocopy Club, The Unphotographable

Eleonora Ronconi

I’m excited to introduce photographer, Eleonora Ronconi,  as next week’s guest curator and writer.  My busy travel schedule this fall opened an opportunity to ask a few guest editors to share work from different parts of the world, giving Lenscratch readers a fresh perspective on photography outside of the United States.  Next week Eleonora will be presenting photographers from Latin America, and in upcoming weeks, German photographer, Jacqueline Roberts, will be sharing work from European Photographers.  I can’t wait to see who they feature and learn more about global photography starting on Monday.  Thank you in advance to Eleonora and Jacqueline for all their efforts.

Eleonora Ronconi by Aline Smithson

Growing up in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Eleonora tried to balance her love for the arts and sciences. She attended medical school for four years, but then had a change of heart and followed her entrepreneurial spirit and fluency in multiple languages to begin a career in conference interpreting. Her business has allowed her to travel extensively, and in 1998 she settled in Northern California and established her own interpreting company. Her photography has been a life long passion. Eleonora’s first solo exhibition was in her native Buenos Aires in 2009 and she has exhibited around the globe. Her work has been published by numerous magazines including Fraction and F-Stop.  She is best known for her project, Once Upon a Time, that deals with memory and loss. I am featuring her cell phone project, Fragmentos today.

image from Once Upon a Time
FRAGMENTOS 

These photos are part of an ongoing personal project about my childhood.

I have been living in California for 13 years and even though I visit Buenos Aires every year, this was the first time that I photographed there.

I have been going through a difficult transitional time, so I decided, on this visit, to go back to my roots and rebuild myself with a camera in hand. 

These images represent my past and symbolize ephemeral moments that developed right before my eyes, just like an old Polaroid photo. From the window of my now empty bedroom in the house where I grew up, to the fish head caught by my departed father, which sits on top of my aunt’s fridge, these photographs document the objects of my past that make up a puzzle I am trying to put together… 

I chose to use my iPhone camera because its small size and ease of use helps me stay in the moment with my surroundings. It also affords me spontaneity and the freedom to express my feelings right in that very moment.

Photo Show – Helen Sears Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments on show at Klompching Gallery New York

© Helen Sear, Sightlines, Untitled 4, 2011. Archival Pigment Print with Acrylic Gesso 7.25” x 7.25”, Edition of 3. From $2,000

© Helen Sear, Pastoral Monument 11, Fumaria Bastardi, 2012, Archival Pigment Print, 27.5” x 27.5”, Edition of 3 + 2 AP’s (AP1 nfs). From $3,000.

 SIGHTLINES AND PASTORAL MOMENTS
The third solo exhibition of new artworks by the British photographer Helen Sear is on until 26 October at the Klompching Gallery in New York. Two new series will be presented as the gallery’s opening exhibition for the 2012–2013 season, accompanied by the US launch of the monograph charting a more than 25-year practice.

“Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments continue Sear’s commitment to conceptual applications, integration of photographic process, historical reference and visual allure. Sightlines is an exquisite set of 21 photographs, partially concerned with ideas about the unique object and the copy. The images themselves depict a portrait of a woman whose face is obscured by a mass-produced, but hand-painted figurine of a bird. Sear alters the final photograph through the application of several layers of white primer—gesso.

“The images, then, are also about photographing paint and painting photographs. This convergence of the unique and/or the copy is further implicated by notions of her concern with identity.obscuring the face of the woman, Sear interrupts the gaze of both sitter and observer. The spectator of the photograph is unable to know the sitter’s identity, in a similar way that she/he can’t know the identity of the person(s) who hand-painted the bird. These small-scale photographs confound our expectations in the most delightful way, and are a testimony to the conceptual and visual strength of Sear’s practice.

“Showing alongside Sightlines, is Pastoral Monuments, which expands an underlying theme of the real and the re-presentation of it. In this case, Sear references the historical photographs of the botanist and photographer, Mary Dillwyn, whose photographs from the early 1850’s depicted wild flowers arranged in domestic crockery. Sear has sourced more than 80 wild flowers from the same Welsh field and photographed them in jugs and vases from around the world.

“Through handling the resulting prints and rephotographing them—evidencing this handling—Sear believes that “the flowers and their containers become connected in a material sense, across the surface of the image.” Further, we see in the photographs familiar ideas associated with flowers—youth, beauty and mortality. In some ways, these photographs become monuments to flowers.” Press release.

Filed under: Art shows, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Helen Sears, New York, Pastoral Monuments, Sightlines

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach

07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty,
Montauk, New York, 2007
From the SurfLand series
Website – JoniSternbach.com

Joni Sternbach was born in the Bronx, New York. She graduated from New York University/International Center of Photography (ICP) with an M.A. in Photography in 1987. She was part of the adjunct faculty at NYU for over 20 years, and is currently a faculty member at ICP and CAP workshops teaching wet plate collodion. Sternbach uses early photographic processes to create contemporary landscapes and seascapes. Her photography has taken her to some of the most desolate deserts in the American West to some of the most prized surf beaches in the world. Her solo exhibition, SurfLand, which captures portraits of surfers in tintype, has exhibited at the Peabody Essex Museum and Blue Sky Gallery and will be on view at the Southeast Museum of Photography in 2012. A monograph of the SurfLand images was published by Photolucida in 2009. She is represented by Rick Wester Fine Art in New York City and Edward Cella Art and Architecture in Los Angeles.