Tag Archives: Silhouettes

Silhouettes in the News

Prior to the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, the silhouette was considered an effective and inexpensive way to record a persons likeness or capture a scene. Although the practice can be traced back to the early 17th century, the term silhouette derives from the harsh policies of the French finance minister tienne de Silhouette.

The silhouette reduces an object to its most basic form. SEO Experts search engine marketing . Its historical uses in art can be seen in the paper cuts of Hans Christian Andersen and the artwork of Kara Walker.In photographic terms, the silhouette is created in situations where the subject is backlit. It can be used to hide a persons identity or play up their distinctive features, and its graphic form is often used artistically to photograph sport and dance. It heightens drama, adds atmosphere and makes a banal scene into a graphic wonder.

More than 200 years ago, the silhouette was the foremost way to document ones appearance, but its still widely used in photographic frames today.From capturing the world’s protests and politicians to wildfires and war zones, LightBox looks at the use ofsilhouetteson the wires this month.

See the first Silhouettes in the News feature on LightBox here.

Silhouettes in the News

Prior to the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, the silhouette was considered an effective and inexpensive way to record a person’s likeness or capture a scene. Although the practice can be traced back to the early 17th century, the term ‘silhouette’ derives from the harsh policies of the French finance minister Étienne de Silhouette.

The silhouette reduces an object to its most basic form. Its historical uses in art can be seen in the paper cuts of Hans Christian Andersen and the artwork of Kara Walker. In photographic terms, the silhouette is created in situations where the subject is backlit. It can be used to hide a person’s identity or play up their distinctive features, and its graphic form is often used artistically to photograph sport and dance. It heightens drama, adds atmosphere and makes a banal scene into a graphic wonder.

More than 200 years ago, the silhouette was the foremost way to document one’s appearance, but it’s still widely used in photographic frames today. From capturing the Costa Concordia to presidential primaries and pilgrims, LightBox looks at the use of silhouettes on the wires this month.

Seth Price

A few issues ago, Blindspot featured Seth Price‘s series of laser-cut silhouettes. Gleaned from generic google image searches, these pieces recall Sherrie Levine’s series of silhouette collages of American presidents (example here). The text below was taken from a press release for Price’s recent exhibition at Friedrich Petzel:

1. A computer search for the most basic terms: ‘eating’, ‘drinking’, ‘writing’, ‘touching’, ‘mother,’ etc. The result might be a digital image, a “jpeg”, for example. The image depicts human interaction: people kissing, someone being fed, a person laying a hand on another’s shoulder. The situation is familiar, but not necessarily clear. At one point this was a photograph, now shrunken, squeezed through the eye of the needle, its information digitally compressed for easy circulation and distribution. It appears as a tiny, lapidary screen image, though we know that if enlarged it will slip away, its edges decaying as the effects of compression become evident.

2. This image is not used, in favor of the area around the image, the negative space, excess, that which lies between the figures.

3. Then, an industrial process: massive enlargement, computer-controlled cutting, woods, plastics, metal. A design process, the fabrication of a “look and feel” that had not previously existed.


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price

Seth Price

A few issues ago, Blindspot featured Seth Price‘s series of laser-cut silhouettes. Gleaned from generic google image searches, these pieces recall Sherrie Levine’s series of silhouette collages of American presidents (example here). The text below was taken from a press release for Price’s recent exhibition at Friedrich Petzel:

1. A computer search for the most basic terms: ‘eating’, ‘drinking’, ‘writing’, ‘touching’, ‘mother,’ etc. The result might be a digital image, a “jpeg”, for example. The image depicts human interaction: people kissing, someone being fed, a person laying a hand on another’s shoulder. The situation is familiar, but not necessarily clear. At one point this was a photograph, now shrunken, squeezed through the eye of the needle, its information digitally compressed for easy circulation and distribution. It appears as a tiny, lapidary screen image, though we know that if enlarged it will slip away, its edges decaying as the effects of compression become evident.

2. This image is not used, in favor of the area around the image, the negative space, excess, that which lies between the figures.

3. Then, an industrial process: massive enlargement, computer-controlled cutting, woods, plastics, metal. A design process, the fabrication of a “look and feel” that had not previously existed.


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price