Tag Archives: Showcases

Tearsheet of the Day | Robin Hammond’s Condemned in The Sunday Times Magazine

Finally got around to reading last weekend’s The Sunday Times Magazine. Robin Hammond’s Condemned project, which documents the treatment of mentally ill in different parts of Africa, is featured prominently in the magazine’s Spectrum section, which showcases great photography. Condemned is shown on the cover and two spreads under the title ‘Lost Souls – The brutal treatment of the mentally in Africa’. The project, which was recently exhibited at Visa pour l’image festival, has its dedicated website at condemned-africa.com.

The Sunday Times Magazine, September 23, 2012.
Photo © Robin Hammond

The Sunday Times Magazine, September 23, 2012.
Photos © Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond is a New Zealand born photographer based in South Africa. He is represented by Panos Pictures.

Falls, Peterson, Torgovnik at Rencontres d’Arles

Watch live streaming video from lesrencontresdarles at livestream.com.

This summer, catch exhibitions by Sam Falls, Regine Petersen, and Jonathan Torgovnik at Recontres d’ Arles (on view through September 23, 2012).  Now in it’s 43rd year, Arles, one of the world’s largest photography festivals, is hosting 60 exhibitions, favoring mostly unpublished work, presented by its founders, teachers and photographers as well as curators who have emerged from their influential school at 20 heritage sites in the South of France.

Sam Falls, who’s work was profiled in Aperture #205, is exhibiting a series of images “investigating the medium’s potential as an art form,” he writes, “but [that] also continue exploring photography’s capacity for representation and challenging its veracity.” The exhibition, which is curated by Philip S. Block, showcases photographs that Falls has manipulated with Photoshop, then hand-painted as well. “The question this raises,” Falls states, “beyond specific medium’s ability to represent an object or idea, is the question of perception itself and how we relate today to photography and painting.”

Regine Petersen, one of the photographers featured in Aperture’s Regenerations 2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today, is exhibiting a series of photographs about meteorites, what she calls “thought images,”  that mark her so-called map from the location of the falls and finds, to the personal lives of eye witnesses and descendants. ”Rather than a reconstruction of the events,” she writes, Finding a Falling Star, presented by Olivier Richon, ”is a collection of traces, an investigation into the workings of time, memory and history and an attempt to create a link between the ordinary and the sublime.” Petersen’s limited edition print Ladybug, 2006, a work from an earlier series, is considered typical of her style of “thought image.”

Jonathan Torgovnik‘s Intended Consequences, which is a series of environmental portraits made in Rwanda of women that were brutally raped during the Rwandan genocide and the children they bore from those encounters, was published as a monograph by Aperture in 2009 alongside a DVD produced by MediaStorm of interviews with the subjects. The exhibition at Rencontres d’Arles, presented by Tadashi Ono, is intended to spread these stories to a wider public, in hopes, Torgovnik writes, that “people will be inspired to act and work toward ensuring that similar acts of violence never happen again, and that those families can have a brighter future.”

Rencontres d’ Arles
Festival runs:
July 2 – September 23, 2012

Contact
34 rue du docteur Fanton
13200 Arles
33 (0) 4 90 96 76 06

Self-Portraits

Self-Portraits

Photographs by Jen Davis, Essay by Hannah Frieser

Flak Photo is proud to feature this gallery in support of Light Work's Looking and Looking, a two-person exhibition featuring photographs from Amy Elkins and Jen Davis. That project explored the dialogue between these artists regarding identity, body image, and the male and female gaze. The following essay accompanies Davis' photos in Contact Sheet 165, a catalog produced for the exhibition. For more information and to order a copy for your personal collection, visit LightWork.org.

 

It is not unusual for artists, including photographers, to turn to self-portraits occasionally. Photographers such as Cindy Sherman have built their career on the practice. When Jen Davis started her photographic series Self-Portraits ten years ago, the images struck a public nerve. The photographs were immediately memorable for their sophisticated style as well as for their distinct subject matter, as Davis bared her struggles with the emotional and physical impact of her weight. Her unusual honesty and vulnerability combined with her understanding for careful composition and delicate lighting invited the viewer into her life beyond normal boundaries of privacy.

One of the most iconic images of her early work is the frequently published photograph Pressure Point, which depicts Davis at the beach looking a little lost in a sea of slimmer bodies. As is common in her images, this photograph communicates a real emotion connected to a place or an action, making it easy to sympathize with her situation. From image to image we see Davis in different scenarios engaging in a world that sets her apart from others.

The title of the series makes it clear that Davis is photographing herself, but the viewer has to discern for themselves the authenticity of the images. These are not documentary images photographed at the actual time a situation originally occurred, but each photograph borrows heavily from real moments and showcases very real feelings. Her earlier images are closer to real moments in their depiction of the awkwardness, shyness, or frustration of a woman with a plus-sized body. They show situations that especially women can easily relate to as universal struggles with body image. Her identity struggles are not so different from many young women who find themselves judged by a male gaze as their bodies blossom into maturity. Yet rather than push back against this gaze, Davis turns to quiet self-examination.

The fact that these images are self-portraits alters the way they should be understood. Davis is not being watched and judged by these images, and instead is shaping each scenario both as the author and the subject. While she has little control on how society sees her in daily life, she has unlimited control of how she decides to photograph and present herself. It is her active choice to use a frank and self-inquisitive style in photography to examine concepts of beauty, desire, and body image. “Photography is the medium that I use to tell my story through life,” Davis writes in her artist statement. It is “an outlet for revealing my thoughts and opinions about the society in which we live. A society that dictates beauty based on one’s physical appearance.”

The level of creative freedom that Davis allows herself has gradually expanded over the years. She began the series trying out familiar scenarios in front of the camera until she could better understand her feelings about them. Since then, self-examination has shifted to self-assertion and finally to self-expression. She is no longer that young student searching to find her place and define her identity, but a woman who claims her right to be included in our understanding of beauty.

In a pivotal moment in 2004, she started manufacturing scenarios for the camera based on situations she could potentially find herself in. This lead to the photograph Fantasy No. 1, and later to other constructed realities, such as Steve and I. From there she has started to work desire and sensuality into more images, leading also to the separate photographic series Webcam and I Ask in Exchange.

Davis still uses the camera as a tool to help her understand the world around her. A decade into this project, she finds that her body is changing. As in the past, she continues to photograph through every new circumstance and allows the camera to make sense of it all.

Filmmaker Daria Menozzi joins Survival Techniques

The Museum of Contemporary Photography recently added Italian filmmaker Daria Menozzi to the long list of international artists participating in its upcoming group exhibition, Survival Techniques.

Featuring more than a dozen artists from across the globe, Survival Techniques explores displacement, exile and the struggle to exist in a nation of constant turmoil. The exhibition, which runs April 12 through July 1, showcases people’s experiences living through political uncertainty and social unrest, while commenting on the one thing shared by them all: survival.

On Wednesday, April 11 – the day before Survival Techniques opens – the MoCP will host a screening of Menozzi’s film, Before Ai Weiwei. This film provides an intimate look into the life of Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, as he estranges himself from the country where he lives and positions himself as a global force within the art world. It will be shown at 6 p.m. at 623 S. Wabash Ave.

For more information about this screening, visit the events page on the MoCP’s website. To learn more about the other artists exhibiting in Survival Techniques, visit the exhibitions page.

Filmmaker Daria Menozzi joins Survival Techniques

The Museum of Contemporary Photography recently added Italian filmmaker Daria Menozzi to the long list of international artists participating in its upcoming group exhibition, Survival Techniques.

Featuring more than a dozen artists from across the globe, Survival Techniques explores displacement, exile and the struggle to exist in a nation of constant turmoil. The exhibition, which runs April 12 through July 1, showcases people’s experiences living through political uncertainty and social unrest, while commenting on the one thing shared by them all: survival.

On Wednesday, April 11 – the day before Survival Techniques opens – the MoCP will host a screening of Menozzi’s film, Before Ai Weiwei. This film provides an intimate look into the life of Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, as he estranges himself from the country where he lives and positions himself as a global force within the art world. It will be shown at 6 p.m. at 623 S. Wabash Ave.

For more information about this screening, visit the events page on the MoCP’s website. To learn more about the other artists exhibiting in Survival Techniques, visit the exhibitions page.

Emiliano Granado, Untitled

Emiliano Granado, Untitled

Emiliano Granado

Untitled,
Umpqua Hot Spring, Oregon, 2011
Website – EmilianoGranado.com

Emiliano Granado was born in La Plata, Argentina. His family moved to the United States when he was four years old to escape the political insecurity following The Dirty War of the late '70s. He graduated from Amherst College in 1999 and has studied at the International Center for Photography and School of Visual Arts. His interest in popular culture can be seen in his earlier work, At the Track and Beach Party, a study of motor racing culture and Spring Break debauchery and hyper-sexuality, respectively. His newest project, Time for Print, showcases the need for exhibition, reflects our notions of sexuality, and focuses on our relationship with The Internet. Emiliano lives in Brooklyn, New York. He likes bikes, sunglasses, and Mexican Coke.

Akiko Takizawa @Daiwa Foundation, London


At the heart of Japanese photographer Akiko Takizawa’s work lies feelings of dislocation, displacement and isolation. Her black and white photographs, unsettling yet peaceful, are imbued with a sense of loss and longing while retaining that vital glimmer of hope. Dim shafts of light creep into dusty, shadow-shrouded interiors or softly illuminate barren landscapes. The images seem suspended between a dreamlike and wakeful state, teetering at the threshold of consciousness. The line between sleep and death, death and life is tantalisingly blurred. 

Her most recent exhibition, Over the Parched Field, on display at Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, London from 18 January to 1 March, showcases a selection of collotype prints of Takizawa’s work from the last six years, photographs she describes as “semi-autobiographical”. Taken at the shrines of Osorezan (Fear Mountain) and Goshogawara in county Aomori in the north of Japan, they depict holy places that were created to memorialiseand heal the spirits of children who have passed away. Stone statues adorn the volcanic landscape, protecting the souls of the deceased, while ‘bridal’ shrines are draped with mementoes, left by parents for their children when they come of age. Takizawa describes it as a place of calm that heightened her sense of solitude.

Loss is obviously a central theme in her work – both personal and the loss of others – although the pictures she takes are very much for her. “I take photographs for my own sake,” remarks Takizawa. “In one way I’m documenting what I see but what appears [in my pictures] has a more dreamlike quality. Sometimes it feels like it’s not completely up to me what appears in the photographs. But I feel a need to communicate what I see.”

Takizawaalso says she uses her photography to communicate with relatives who are no longer alive. “I feel that my camera acts as an antenna to receive signals carrying urgent messages from the lost lives and objects that fill the air around us.” She adds: “We think of time as a single line but people talk about there being another time, and that concept interests me. I feel a sense of déja-vu, though not necessarily having lived a past life. Maybe living and dying are on the same line. When I look at photographs of dead people I almost feel that their lives are continuing within the photographs.”

Takizawa describes her work as the embodiment of feeling like a stranger in her own country, and indeed she admits that it was not until she left Japan that she could begin to reflect upon her complex relationship with her background. This distance allowed her to begin to make sense of the photographs she took there. “I had to physically remove myself from Japan in order to work on [the photographs,]” she confesses. “Even though I love Japan, I feel I don’t fit in, although I always want to photograph my country.”

Gemma Padley is the Features Editor at Amateur Photographer Magazine and is currently studying a Masters in the History of Art with Photography at Birkbeck University.

Keliy Anderson-Staley Photobook Giveaway

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Keliy Anderson-Staley Contact Sheet #163

A collaboration with Light Work

Hello All,

I'm thrilled to kick off the 2012 Flak Photo Galleries program with an online exhibition by photographer Keliy Anderson-Staley. The community response has been amazing and nearly 3,000 people have viewed her images since the gallery went live last weekend. Thanks so much to those of you who have shared the post with students and colleagues!

View Keliy's [hyphen] Americans exhibition in the Flak Photo Galleries »

A key part of my mission is to promote independent photo publications, so I'm excited to team up with Light Work, a nonprofit organization that supports artists working in photography, to give away signed copies of Keliy's issue of Contact Sheet to ten Flak Photo fans. Keliy's book, which was published in conjunction with her solo exhibition at Light Work last fall, showcases her beautiful tintype portraits and an essay by Light Work Executive Director Jeffrey Hoone.

Learn more about Contact Sheet #163 »

Getting in on the drawing is easy: To enter, browse Keliy's Flak Photo Profile and post a link to one of your favorite tintypes in the comments at the bottom of this post. Ten fans will be randomly selected from the submissions to receive a complimentary copy of the catalog. Call for entries closes Thursday, February 2 at 11:59 PM CDT.

Browse Keliy Anderson-Staley's Flak Photo Profile »

I'd love for more people to hear about this giveaway: If you use social media to talk about photography or are connected to an online photo community, please share this post using the buttons in the upper right corner of the page. Good Luck!

Best,

Andy Adams
Editor • Producer • Publisher
FlakPhoto.com

 

PS: Light Work is giving away signed copies of the book too! Visit their Facebook page for details »