Tag Archives: Shortlist

Photo News – Martin Faltejsek wins first prize in The Macallan Masters of Photography The Last Word competition

First, Martin Fatejsek, Personality

© Martin Faltejsek, Personality

Martin Faltejsek from the Czech Republic has won first prize in The Macallan (single-malt whisky) Masters of Photography ‘The Last Word’ competition for his story, Personality. “’Embrace your imperfections, they make you who you are’. I profoundly stand for this. In this photo I wanted to show human/our defencelessness and how vulnerable we are. Human personality is something really strange, weird, easy-to-hurt and suggestible. I simply do not get mean people.”

Second prize goes to Jonathan Agami. The story: GENIE: “Is that the singer of that band? Or is it “Your wish is my command?..” * Ivar, the leading singer of a Swedish band.”

Second prize, Jonathan Agami, GENIE

© Jonathan Agami, GENIE

Third prize to Gabor Dvornik. The story: Life: “When you are young, you run and hustle, you dare, you get wounded and you do it again and again. If you are wise enough, you learn from your errors and will do better from day to day. Life gives this experience but is a costly thing – gives you scars and wrinkles to your face.”

Third prize Gabor Dvornik, Life

© Gabor Dvornik, Life

The global competition attracted almost 1,000 entries, over 2,500 images and 2,625 public votes. It was launched in celebration of The Macallan’s third Masters of Photography Series, collaboration with Annie Leibovitz. Celebrating Annie Leibovitz’s world famous portraits, photography aficionados were invited to upload a portrait they have taken with one word – ‘The Last Word’ – capturing the mood of their photograph. Online votes were cast to create a shortlist of 50 images. A judging panel of three then selected the winners.

Martin wins a two-night stay in Edinburgh for two, visits The Macallan, Easter Elchies House with a full distillery tour and photography-themed visit and samples a selection of The Macallan’s finest whiskies. He also receives a Fujifilm X-Pro1 camera.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Awards & Competitions Tagged: Gabor Dvornik, Martin Faltejsek, Masters of Photography, photo competition, The Last Word, The Macallan

Photo News – Shortlist announced for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013 and new Hotshoe iPad App out now

© Chris Killip, nominee for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013

A newsy post today as The Photographers’ Gallery announces the shortlist for the annual Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013 with an interesting mix of the old and the new, or rather, the more traditional and the contemporary. It’s great to see Chris Kilip in the mix as he surely represents a different generation of photographers from the remaining three nominees who were all born in the 1970s. In fact, I’d hazard a guess that he’s the only one who would refer to himself as a photographer rather than artist/visual artist using photography, or other such label.

© Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, nominee for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013

The shortlist is based on “a specific body of work in an exhibition or publication format, which has significantly contributed to photography in Europe between 1 October 2011 and 30 September 2012″. Mmmmm. That’s a tall order as how can one tell whether a body of work “has significantly contributed to photography in Europe between 1 October 2011 and 30 September 2012″?

How is this measured and what are the criteria?

And why these cut off dates?

Doesn’t the significance of the publication, or show, need some distance in time to show what its contribution is? What if a show is “ahead of its time” and only gets recognized years later?

I’m happy to see these nominees (two, in particular), however, as I guess happens every year, I can think of one artist/show at the Imperial War Museum in London by Ori Gersht that I would have liked to have seen nominated. I wonder why it wasn’t in the running, or maybe it was?

DEUTSCHE BORSE PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2013 SHORTLIST
“This year’s jury selected four artists whose work represents four distinct and significant positions within contemporary photography – Chris Killip for his singular and timeless vision reinterpreting the possibilities of documentary practice; Broomberg & Chanarin for their surgical examination of images of conflict using Brecht’s War Primer as their source; Mishka Henner for appropriating the archive of Google Street View photographs to examine the landscape of today’s sex workers and Cristina De Middel’s ‘mockumentary’ on the Zambian space programme which confidently blurs the boundaries of fact and fiction in a highly original way.”
Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery and Chair of the Jury.

The four artists shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013 are Mishka Henner, Chris Killip, Cristina De Middel and the artist duo Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin.

© Mishka Henner, nominee for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013

The annual award of £30,000 rewards a living photographer, of any nationality, for a specific body of work in an exhibition or publication format, which has significantly contributed to photography in Europe between 1 October 2011 and 30 September 2012. The winner will be announced at a special ceremony at The Photographers’ Gallery in May 2013. The Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013is presented by The Photographers’ Gallery, London.

© Cristina de Middel, nominee for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013

I was going to post a multimedia video by Cristina de Middel from the recent SlideLuck London show in Brighton, see previous post, so I thought I’d add it here as she’s one of the nominees (though not for this work).

Cristina de Middel – Made in from elciclopemecanico on Vimeo.

For information on each of the nominees, read more…

HOTSHOE NEW iPAD ISSUE OUT NOW


Look out for the new issue of the Hotshoe iPad app which is out with a lead feature by a previous Deutsche Börse nominee Pieter Hugo.

Featuring: David Chancellor’s documentary project, Hunters, exploring Africa through the eyes of the tourist trophy hunter; Photojournalist Christopher Anderson comes in from the cold to create his emotive series, Son; Pieter Hugo’s haunting portraits from There’s a Place in Hell for Me and My Friends; Cyrus Shahrad’s hilarious essay in response to Matthieu Lavanchy’s Mr Schulmann or the Man in the High Castle; Laura Noel’s Withdrawn library books and in the Hot Seat, Prestel Director, Andrew Hansen, talks about keeping the faith.

Plus reviews of Sophie Calle’s book Rachel, Monique…., WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, curated by Anne Tucker, the Canon EOS 5D, as well as A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York: Return of the Supressed (3), a round up of the latest photo books, exhibition listings, news and more.

Exclusive App Content: Michael Jang’s Summer Weather and Roman Drits Auftakt, with added multimedia content from Andrew Hansen, plus enriched portfolios, clickable exhibition listings and much, much more.

Download the app for free and then subscribe for one year for just £9.99, and get the latest issue of Hotshoe directly to your iPad every other month.

DEUTSCHE BORSE PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2013 SHORTLIST Cont…
The four shortlisted artists have been nominated for the following projects:

Adam Broomberg (b. 1970, South Africa) & Oliver Chanarin (b. 1971, UK) are nominated for their publication War Primer 2 (2012, MACK). The limited edition book physically inhabits the pages of Bertolt Brecht’s publication War Primer (1955). In the original, Brecht matched WWII newspaper clippings with short poems that sought to demystify press images, which he referred to as hieroglyphics. In War Primer 2 Broomberg & Chanarin choose to focus on the ‘War on Terror’; sifting through the internet for low resolution screen-grabs and mobile phone images, the artists then combined them to resonate with Brecht’s poems. Through this layering of photographic history, Broomberg & Chanarin offer a critique of photographs of contemporary conflict and their dissemination—a theme that has been at the centre of their practice for fifteen years.

Mishka Henner (b. 1976, UK) is nominated for his exhibition No Man’s Land at Fotografia Festival Internazionale di Roma, Museum of Contemporary Art, Rome, Italy (20 September – 28 October 2012). In No Man’s Land Henner explores the margins of European urban and rural environments with images produced using Google Street View. Identifying geographic locations from online forums where men share information on the whereabouts of sex workers, Henner visits and records these sites using the mechanical gaze of car-mounted cameras. Henner’s work poses complex questions about the blurring of boundaries between voyeurism, online information gathering and privacy rights.

Chris Killip (b. 1946, UK) is nominated for his exhibition What Happened Great Britain 1970 – 1990 at Le Bal, Paris (11 May – 19 August 2012). In this series of stark black and white images Killip chronicles the disintegration of industrial Britain in working class communities in the north of England. Immersing himself in the lives of the people he documented, Killip tells personal stories of men at work set against a backdrop of socio-political upheaval.

Cristina De Middel(b. 1975, Spain) is nominated for her publication The Afronauts (2011, self-published). In 1964, after gaining independence, Zambia started a space programme led by Edward Makuka Nkoloso, sole member of the unheard of National Academy of Science, Space Research and Philosophy. The programme, whose aim was to send the first African astronauts to Mars, was soon cancelled, becoming no more than an amusing anecdote in the country’s history. In The Afronauts De Middel creates a subjective version of the story engaging with myths and truths. The book is comprised of a series of constructed colour photographs, sequenced alongside drawings and reproductions of letters, resulting in a fictional portrait of a national dream.

The members of the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013 jury are: Joan Fontcuberta, artist; Andrea Holzherr, Exhibition Manager, Magnum; Karol Hordziej, Artistic Director, Krakow Photomonth; and Anne-Marie Beckmann, Curator, Art Collection Deutsche Börse, Germany. Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, is the non-voting Chair.

Works by the shortlisted photographers will be shown in an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery followed by presentations at the Deutsche Börse headquarters in Frankfurt/Eschborn and at C/O Berlin, Forum for Visual Dialogues.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Awards & Competitions Tagged: Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Chris Killip, Cristina De Middel, Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2013, Hotshoe iPad app, Mishka Henner, Ori Gersht, photo competitions, The Photographers’ Gallery

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | August 2012

Deadlines

The New York Photo Awards : August 17

The Times/Canon Young Photographer of the Year  : August 19

The PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Award : September 1

Bradford Fellowship in Photography : September 3

CGAP Photo Contest 2012 : September 3

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award  : September 15

CDS/Honickman First Book Prize : September 15

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Photo © Kai Wiedenhöfer/ Fondation Carmignac Gestion

apertureWEEK: Photography Reading Shortlist

© International Center of Photography, 2012. Photograph by John Berens.

›› Throw out your SLR? App-maker Hipstamatic announced its plans to launch the Hipstamatic Foundation for Photojournalism to educate and support ”the next generation of photographic storytellers using smartphones with Hipstamatic.” Photojournalist Brad Mangin posted “How I Made Instagram Images That Were Good Enough for Sports Illustrated,” an essay about how he got a portfolio of iPhone Instagrams published, and how you can too. Traditional photojournalists everywhere are groaning, but check out Benjamin Lowy’s blog featuring his reports from Libya via Instagram (supported in part by a Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund grant) and judge for yourself.

›› The Associated Press has announced that it will be using robotic cameras (in addition to its team of photographers) to photograph the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. These cameras, which have been mounted on ceilings and the bottom of pools, will provide an otherwise impossible perspective on the games. On the heels of the highly controversial Olympics Portraits that made the rounds on the web earlier this month, LightBox tells the story of The Best Magazine Assignment Ever, photographer’s Neil Leifer’s 1984 “Olympic Odyssey Around the World” during which he traveled to 13 different countries to create a collection of images that would appear in TIME’s preview of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

›› The New York Times Lens Blog published a collection of color slides taken by groundbreaking American photographer, musician, writer and film director Gordon Parks in 1956, images from his “Segregation Series” that had been thought lost until they were found at the bottom of a box this spring. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture opened Gordon Parks: 100 Moments, a retrospective focusing on the photographer’s work in Harlem and Washington D.C. in the 1940s. The International Center of Photography opened an exhibition of Parks’ photographs in May, and they’ll be on view until January 2013. Parks, who died in 2006, would have been 100 this year.

›› What does the future hold for photography publishing? The British Journal of Photography reported on the growing body of work being printed on newsprint, profiling publications by Jason Larkin, Guy Martin, Alec Soth, and Rob Hornstra, who are enthusiastic about the medium’s affordability and impermanence. Joerg Colberg discussed how serious photography might best use the internet as a means of dissemination.

›› The Guardian’s Geoff Dyer profiles StreetViewer photographer Michael Wolf, as well as Doug Rickard whose forthcoming monograph A New American Picture sparked lively debate on our Facebook page last week, some condemning his practice as lazy appropriation, and others praising its conceptual ingenuity. In discussing Rickard, Dyer links “this new way of working” to the candid photography traditions of Paul Strand, Robert Frank, and Walker Evans: “The shifting spirit of Robert Frank seems also to be lurking, as if the Google vehicle were an updated incarnation of the car in which he made his famous mid-50s road trip to produce his photographic series, The Americans.” In other virtual reality news, StreetView now includes images from the Antarctic huts of explorers Shackleton and Scott, providing yet more digital space for such artists to explore.

Call For Entries | The Paris Photo – Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards

Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation have joined forces to launch two new photobook awards in 2012, celebrating the book’s contribution to the evolving narrative of photography. Entries will be accepted from July 15 through September 10, 2012. A pre-selected shortlist of thirty titles will be profiled in The PhotoBook Review; exhibited at Paris Photo at the Grand Palais and at Aperture Gallery in New York; and tour to other venues, to be determined. Winners will be revealed on November 14, 2012, Paris Photo opening day.

FEATURING TWO PRIZE CATEGORIES


First PhotoBook
A $10,000 prize will be awarded to the photographer/artist whose first photobook is deemed by an independent jury to be best of the year.

PhotoBook of the Year
PhotoBook of the Year will be awarded to the photographer/artist, and publisher responsible, whose book is deemed by an independent jury to be the best of the year.


THE JURY


The awards will be judged in two stages. An initial jury will meet in New York to select the shortlisted entries in both categories. Jurors will include Phillip BlockJulien FrydmanChris BootLesley A. Martin, and James Wellford. The final winners will be decided by a separate jury that will meet in Paris before Paris Photo begins, including Els BarentsRoxana MarcociEdward Robinson, and Thomas Seelig.

The preselection of thirty books will be announced mid-September and showcased on both the Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation websites.

THE AWARDS CEREMONY AT PARIS PHOTO: NOVEMBER 14, 2012

The top award-winners in each category will be selected in Paris by a jury at the beginning of the fair. The winners will be announced during the opening day, on November 14, 2012. The winning photographer for the First PhotoBook category will receive a $10,000 prize.

THE PHOTOBOOK REVIEW

The third issue of The PhotoBook Review, published by Aperture, will be launched at Paris Photo, and will present the thirty preselected books.

EXHIBITION OF THE PHOTOBOOKS

The thirty shortlisted books will be displayed during Paris Photo at the Grand Palais in the publishers’ dedicated space. After Paris Photo, the exhibition will travel to Aperture Gallery in New York, and to other venues to be determined.

ENTER HERE

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

›› Vice‘s Motherboard blog released the never-before-told story of the first photograph ever uploaded to the World Wide Web, which celebrates its 20th anniversary next Wednesday.  The image, which has been referred to as “a Photoshop disaster,” has been met with equal parts adoration and horror since its release. The story also appeared on Gallerist NY and ABC News’ Tech This Out, which digs a bit deeper into the naïve roots of the image.

›› PIX, a proposed “photography lifestyle magazine for women,” has drawn commentary from photo editors Stella Kramer and Jasmine DeFoore and Jezebel blogger Katie J.M. Baker for its fluffy content—stories like “Smudge-proof makeup tips for long days behind the camera”—directed towards young female photographers.

›› Two years ago, Scott Blake, the digital artist behind the “Chuck Close Filter” website, was confronted by Close himself for what the painter believed to be unfair use of his copyrighted artwork. Blake recently recounted his dormant dispute with Close in an online essay, raising questions about when art is derivative, when it is plagiaristic, and if it’s possible for it to ever be entirely original. Wired reported, bloggers weighed in.

›› Les Rencontres d’Arles was in full swing last week. As The Guardian reported, Christian Patterson’s Redheaded Peckerwood took home the festival’s author book award, the second year in a row that a Mack-published photobook has won the award—Taryn Simon’s A Living Man Declared Dead…was the 2011 winner. Jonathan Torgovnik won the €25,000 Discovery prize for Intended Consequences, and The Latin American Photobook was awarded the festival’s historical book prize. Additionally, Magnum celebrated its 65th anniversary at the festival, announced nominees Zoe Strauss, Jerome Sessini and Bieke Depoorter, and considered what the future holds for the organization.

›› Yoda reviewed photobooks a couple of weeks ago on Blake Andrews’ blog. We can’t believe we missed it. Work by Vivian Maier, Duane Michals, Rinko KawauchiAlec Soth and John Gossage, and The PhotoBook Review were amongst the titles critiqued by the Jedi Master. On the Gossage/Soth collaboration The Auckland Project: “Tack this poster to their dorm room I’m guessing few collectors shall. In protective cover will it remain. Hmm. Yeesss.”

›› The Rolling Stones celebrate their 50th anniversary this week and Magnum has reached into the archives, posting on their Facebook page a vintage Guy Le Querrec image of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards at a show in 1967. Over at The New Yorker, Photo Booth has launched an 11-image slideshow of photos from the band’s early years, including a birds-eye shot of fans mobbing the band’s vehicle after a press conference at the Hilton, NYC in 1965.

›› More in anniversary news…In celebration of  the 50th anniversary of Andy Warhol’s first solo exhibition, at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles, The Metropolitan Museum of Art is planning Regarding Warhol: Fifty Artists, Fifty Years, which opens in September and will also feature works by photographers Cindy Sherman and Robert Mapplethorpe. Over at NokiaConnects Joel Willians recounts the 5 Strangest Habits of Andy Warhol, asking the age-old question, “Eccentricity and genius go hand in hand, right?”

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

  • APhotoEditor and Conscientious Extended do round-ups of the many arguments and comments ignited by an NPR intern’s blog post about never paying for music and David Lowery‘s response to the post, looping in MediaStorm’s recent pay-per-story model announcement and its reception to explore what these kinds of attitudes could mean for the creative fields in general.
  • The highly anticipated, so-called “Google Glasses” were demoed at the I/O conference this week, PetaPixel reports. These camera-equiped goggles, which are set to ship sometime next year, could one day allow point-of-view shooting and instant sharing online. The relatively discreet $1500 device has the potential to bring about the most radical change to street photography since the development of the 35mm film camera.
  • Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey blogs about packing up and heading off to Les Rencontres d’Arles, ”arguably one of the most important international photography assemblages,” where he’ll be doing free portfolio reviews along with the rest of the staff of Burn Magazine. Additionally at Arles, sixty exhibitions by photographers including Sam Falls, Regine Petersen, and Jonathan Torgovnik, author of the monograph Intended Consequences, are on view through September 23.
  • Boston‘s The Big Picture shares photos from LGBT pride events taken around the world, some of which were met with violence and intimidation. The New Yorker‘s Photobooth shares a selection of black-and-white images from the 70s and 80s, “Forty-Three Years After Stonewall,” when a riot at a popular Manhattan gay bar in response to a routine police raid ignited the LGBT rights movement.
  • Feature Shoot shares a terrific hour-long streaming documentary on Magnum Photo founder Henri Cartier-Bresson, “Just Plain Love,” which features backstories from many famous photographs, directed by Raphaël O’Byrne in 2001.
  • Photoshop, the Game, otherwise known as LevelUp for Photoshop, which offers the opportunity for users of the software to improve their skills, learn new features, and win prizes, is free online until July 15, 2012, reports John Nack. Maybe by then, you too can be as good as Kelli Connell, whose exhibition Double Life is on view through this Saturday, June 30.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • Forty years after AP photographer Nick Ut took the iconic ‘napalm girl‘ photograph in Vietnam, photographer David Burnett writing for the Washington Post reflects on an exposure that could have been his. He was standing mere feet away from the scene, surrounded by journalists, re-loading film into his Leica when he missed what became a most emblematic moment. The entry seems like it might have been a good fit for Will Steacy’s collection Photographs Not Taken, which features similar essays from photographers on moments that never became their pictures.
  • “Radical change in the photography industry during the past five years has ignited an explosion of photo collectives,” writes James Estrin for the New York Times’ LENS Blog. He explores this recent trend after witnessing an impressive presentation by the newly formed Grain collective at the Look3 Festival in  Charlottesville, VA last month. The post offers a good bit of context for this May, 2012 Wired piece: “7 Budding Photo Collectives You Need To Know.”
  • New Yorker’s PhotoBooth profiles Underage, an exhibition of work from six emerging photographers in their late teens and early twenties on view at Photoville, an exciting, week-and-a-half-long photography happening which kicks off in Brooklyn this Friday, June 22,  and features 60,000 square feet of exhibitions, hands-on workshops, nighttime projections, a “photo dog run,” and a “camera garden.” Find daily programming here.
  • Time‘s LightBox goes “Behind the Cover: Capturing the American Dream,” exploring the process of the photo shoot for the birds-eye-view cover image by Jeff Minton that illustrates Jon Meacham’s article, “The History of the American Dream,” for this week’s magazine. They also profile Mike Sinclair, whose photographs accompany the same article inside the magazine. His current exhibition, Public Assembly, is on view at Jen Bekman Projects in New York City until June 23, 2012.
  • A few things on street photography this week. Blogger and photographer Blake Andrews, who is interviewed by LPV Magazine here, reviews Cedar Pasori’s recently published “50 Greatest Street Photographers Right Now,” with an extensive selection of images. PetaPixel posts the highly informative video by Portland-based photographer Jimmy Hickey, “How to Photograph Complete Strangers” and the free 31-day “program” and e-book by street photographer Eric Kim, “Overcoming Your Fear of Street Photography in 31 Days.” This fall, we’re very excited to be publishing a monograph by Doug Rickard, “A New American Picture,” which offers a radical rethinking of street photography–photographs re-taken in Google’s Street View.
  • Fototazo does another Book Discussion Group Recap on Gerry Badger’s collection of essays, The Pleasure of Good Photographs, this time focusing on “Without Author or Art: The Quiet Photograph,” exploring the restrained work of Stephen Shore, among others.
  • The Fotojatka festival that traveled to cinemas around the Czech Republic last week screening audiovisual photography slideshows is now offering them free on their website featuring work by Kristoffer Axén, Nikos Economopoulos, Erwin Olaf, and Reiner Riedler.