Tag Archives: Short Films

Slideluck Potshow London: Two highlights – Japan, I wish I knew your name by Pierfrancesco Celada and Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne

Slideluck Potshow London, organized by Mariateresa Salvati and invited to Brighton by the Miniclicks Photo Talks crew, held its first event in Brighton on Sunday to screen a selection of photos from past editions. 24 works were chosen by New Statesman photo editor, Rebecca McClelland, and artistic director and curator of QUAD and coFounder and director of FORMAT Festival, Louise Clements. As with Pecha Kucha, there is a particular formula for the events which take place in cities around the world. The event is free and is organised on a voluntary basis.

What is Slideshow Potluck?
“It is a NYC-based arts non-profit, operating in many cities globally, that aims to bring people together around food and art, and to give people an interesting, engaging, and fun platform for sharing art with their community.” From the website.

PIERFRANCESCO CELADA – JAPAN, I WISH I KNEW YOUR NAME

Japan, I wish I knew your name from pierfrancesco celada on Vimeo.

Pierfrancesco Celada is one to watch and his multimedia piece, Japan, I wish I knew your name, with its artful interplay of still photography, moving image and sound, was, for me, one of the highlights of the Slideshow. Why? Because the whole concept works really well as a multimedia work; it is well-conceived, wonderfully executed and is elevated by its aesthetic considerations, sequencing, use of camera shots and the ambient soundscapes. I was utterly transported for all 3mins 51 secs.

The work was produced at Magnum in Motion, New York, courtesy of Ideastap Photographic Award and received an Honourable Mention, Lensculture International Exposure Awards, 2011.

Celada writes: “During a brief visit to Japan in 2009 I was soon fascinated by the isolation and loneliness I was feeling in the streets. It started as a personal journey, a foreigner traveling in an alien environment. Language and cultural differences were only augmenting this distance between the locals and me. However, while observing people, it was clear that even indigenous were not able to interact successfully. I have then decided to come back in 2010 and better visualize these concepts.

“The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction. The purpose of this investigation is to create awareness and highlight the problems that modernization and the rapid changes in the environment create in our lives. Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Do we feel part of the environment? Are we alone in the crowd?” From the website.

MARTIN USBORNE – MUTE – THE SILENCE OF DOGS IN CARS


© Martin Osborne, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, 2012
I love Martin’s body of work, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, which was featured in Hotshoe magazine. So it was fantastic to see the collection of images as a slideshow and the immersion in the backroom of the Green Door in Brighton seemed to echo that of the dogs in the cars, especially as photographers were dotted round the room taking photos as we watched the show. (Note to organizers: I find that it disturbs my concentration when I’m watching a slideshow or film and I know that people are taking photos. What about after the show, rather than during?)

I really feel for these dogs and Martin does too. In fact, he cares so much that he’s set up A year to help blog where you can follow his progress as he attempts “to save all animals everywhere” in a year. I should put him in touch with my mum, who wants some of her ashes scattered in the Coliseum or Torre Argentina where the Gatti di Roma (Cats of Rome) have special status.

I love the text on his website too: “Martin lives in East London where he has his photographic studio. He is interested in the ever-curious and often disturbing relationship between humans and other animals.” However, if he reads this, there is the letter n missing from the first ‘and’ in the text on his site, I’ve added it here. Call me pedantic, but I’d rather mention it so that it can be rectified, than ignore it.

If you’re going to Paris Photo, Martin will be doing a book signing of Mute – The Silence of Dogs in Cars tomorrow at 4pm at the Kehrer Publishing stand, EE3. And if you miss this, you can catch the show in London next year from 19 March  – 27 April 2013 when it will be exhibited at The Little Black Gallery.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photographers blogs, Photography Shows, short films Tagged: brighton, HotShoe, Japan I wish I knew your name, Kehrer Publishing, Louise Clements, Mariateresa Salvati, Paris Photo, Pierfrancesco Celada, Rebecca McClelland, Slideluck Potshow Brighton, The Little Black Gallery, The Silence of Dogs

Photo News – Foam for You launches short film featuring Jessica Backhaus and invites amateur photographers to contribute to Wonder Flickr group

Foam For You has launched the second in its series of short films with Jessica Backhaus giving an insight into her working practice as she explores the theme Wonder for Foam magazine. Backhaus featured in Hotshoe magazine way back in April/may 2006 with her series Jesus and the Cherries.

Jesus and the Cherries, © Jessica Backhaus

“Foam For You is an online resource which features professional photographers providing inspiration and advice for amateurs looking to improve their own work. At the core of Foam For You’s content is a series of extended films about the work of three internationally renowned artists: Michael Wolf (USA), Jessica Backhaus (GER) and Melanie Bonajo (NL).

“They have given Foam exclusive access to their working practice in three fifteen minute documentaries. They explain the thinking behind their work and, in particular, how it relates to themes taken from different issues of Foam Magazine, in which their work appeared.”

What’s more, the best ones will appear in a gallery on the Foam website and you could win a year’s subscription to Foam Magazine.

Filed under: short films, Women Photographers Tagged: audience participation, Flickr, Foam for You, Foam magazine, Jessica Backhaus, photography inspiration, short film, Wonder

Dean Chalkley screens The New Faces at the book club in London

iPhone shots from the screening of Dean Chalkley’s latest short film The New Faces at the book club in east London last week. Check out the electric light bulb ceiling. Love it. The 20-minute film played to a packed house and was followed by some rare groove and northern soul moves on the dance floor courtesy of the audience. See previous post for more information and a link to the video online.

Filed under: Fashion Photography, Photographers, short films Tagged: Dean Chalkley, mod culture, The Book Club, The New Faces

Music and portrait photographer Dean Chalkley debuts new short film with free night out at Book Club London

Screen shot from The New Faces: A Short Film by Dean Chalkley. Photo courtesy of the photographer and the Book Club.

If you haven’t decided what you want to do tomorrow night, what not head down to the Book Club in east London for a rare, free night of film and dancing.

Dean Chalkley will be airing his new short film The New Faces (20mins) at 7.30pm tomorrow at the Book Club in Hoxton – doors open at 6.00pm. Chalkley’s short film “captures mod culture directly via those involved” and will be followed by a party until 2am. DJs include Jamie Parr, Si Cheeba (Black Cat) and Tomas McGrath, as well as Chalkley. Think rare soul, rhythm & blues, ska, Latin and boogaloo.

About the film: “The New Faces: A Short Filmsteps inside the minds of three young men captured in the enthrallment of a culture that they have fondly devoted themselves to. We are privy to their refreshingly honest, personal and polarised views, rooted in the ideology of a modernist culture.” Press release. There’s a Facebook page too.

The film will be hosted exclusively on SHOWstudio website from 9 March.

For a preview:

The New Faces: A Short Film (Trailer 1) from Dean Chalkley on Vimeo.

Chalkley launched his photo exhibition New Faces at the Book Club in 2010. See previous post on this blog about Chalkley’s debut film Young Souls. And, if you want to know more about Chalkley, read on for his biography.

About Chalkley: “Even whilst studying, Dean was already shooting for the ultimate style bible, Dazed & Confused. His big break came in the form of an advertising campaign to shoot for Levis and Ray-Ban. Dean’s relationship with NME began in 2001 and continues to this day. This collaboration has enabled Dean to work with the likes of Ian Brown, The Arctic Monkeys, Oasis, The White Stripes and Scarlett Johansson.

“His passion for music, fashion and subcultures has been unrelenting. Dean immersed himself in the Mod fashion, attitude and music as a boy and it has remained at the core of his creative energy. With several outstanding bodies of work including Southend’s Underground, The New Faces and Young Souls he has epitomised the union of art, fashion, and music in youth culture over the past decade.

“Running in parallel to his photographic work Dean has produced several moving image pieces. Previous to The New Faces: A Short Film, Dean has received critical acclaim for his other short films such as Young Souls and Strip. The former centered around Northern soul was shown at London Short Film Festival this year and won a place in Creative Review’s Photography Annual, while Strip won ‘Best Experimental film’ at the Kino festival in Manchester and was screened in various other film festivals across Europe.”

Filed under: Fashion Photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Portraiture, short films Tagged: Book Club, Dean Chalkley, london, mod culture, music photographer, New Faces, Northern Soul, The New Faces

Splice Up: Film snippets edited to Lionel Ritchie’s Hello song by Matthijs Vlot

I couldn’t resist this wonderful filmic treat for all of you who didn’t receive any Bloody Valentine’s Day wishes – This is for YOU.

Hello by Lionel Ritchie never sounded this good to me. This is edited by Matthijs Vlot. Thank you – it put a smile on my face and made me laugh. It is 1 min 18 seconds long and appeared on cinema.nl/cinematv. Thanks to Brian Foreman for this share.

Hello wherever you are. Feel free to add your native language as a comment and do correct any of these that are wrong.

Hello – Halo – Hallo – Halló – ¡Hola! – hallo! – Aloha – hallå! – a lô! – C’kemi – Ola – Bonos díes – Kaixo – Dobar dan – Bon dia – Bok – Ahoj – Hej – Saluton – Terve – Salut – Selamat siang – Salve – Sveiki – Zdravo -Kia ora – Hei – Sillaw – Sain uu? – Salut – Merhaba – Sawubona

Filed under: short films Tagged: film editiing, Hello, Lionel Ritchie, Matthijs Vlot, short film

Oscars 2012: Great Performances

Each January, Los Angeles is effervescent with anticipation, as the world’s biggest stars gather to participate in a flurry of parties, dinners and events in the walk-up to the Golden Globes, marking the beginning of the awards season. This year was no exception.

TIME’s annual Oscars portfolio showcases each year’s best performers through a portfolio of striking portraits. Tears, giggles, pranks and emotions ran high, and loads of laughter pealed through the studio during this year’s shoot, which resulted in a series of images and short films photographed and directed by Sebastian Kim. It was our most ambitious Oscars shoot yet. We had just three days to photograph and film 12 world-class actors during their busiest time of the year.

George Clooney arrived early on set, but it didn’t take long for the actor to settle in and begin joking around and planning pranks with Michael Fassbender, who had recently been photographed by Kim for the February issue of Interview magazine. This previous experience of working together made for a great rapport between them. And it wasn’t the only happy reunion on set: Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer happily embraced upon seeing each other on our set, giving us a glimpse of the fun these two had while working together on The Help. Later, Adepero Oduye was brought to tears when introduced by Joel Stein, who was on hand to interview the actors, to Davis, one of her greatest heroes. “It was so unbelievably Hollywood and yet really real,” Stein says.

Kim says that the project was the most star-studded he’s photographed so far. “I was quite excited photographing Meryl Streep,” he says, noting that his girlfriend is a big fan of the actress’s, “so naturally I was quite nervous when I met her. Being nervous on set is not a good thing as it impedes your concentration, but I just kept thinking, ‘My gosh…I better a get a good shot of her and make my girlfriend happy!’”

But Kim needn’t have been nervous. Streep was running a bit late, having arrived from a previous shoot with MGM studios, where she was taking part in a project to photograph the greatest living actors of our time. She was immediately forgiven—and how could she not be? Streep is kind and gracious, possesses a rare elegance and professionalism that made the photo shoot feel like anything but work. In fact, this set the tone for all of our actors’portraits, which also included sittings with Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, Christopher Plummer, Michelle Williams, Rooney Mara, Jean Dujardin, as well as the adorable Uggie, the dog in The Artist.

It’s a rare pleasure to watch actors of this caliber play for the camera. Instead of characters, they play themselves, with a focus and passion that can only come from years of experience on set.

The performers’interviews with Joel Stein can be viewed here.

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 audio podcast with festival founder and director Annoushka Hempel

With just 12 days to go till the Colombo Art Biennale (CAB) opens – from 15-19 February – the Roaming Eye (tRE) caught up with CAB  festival founder and director Annoushka Hempel to find out more ahead of the opening.

Annoushka kindly spared 30 mins to talk to Hotshoe Blog about how the festival started in post-conflict Sri Lanka, its aims, the type of works on show, funding, the theme ‘Becoming’, and future developments and hopes. The festival takes place across three sites Park Street Mews, JDA Perera Gallery and the National Art Gallery.

The audio is just under 30 mins long and it’s really worth listening to every second. So, why not tune in while you cook, clean or just sit back and listen.

Click on the link below – it goes lime green – then follow it the podcast named CAB Annoushka Hempel_Audio1 and click again for it to load. Enjoy.

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 interview with Annoushka Hempel

For those who like visuals, watch this video I am  (1m 59s) – a multimedia exploration of identity through the lives of Sri Lankan elders. It reflects on the question: Was there a time when Sri Lankans didn’t describe themselves as Sinhalese, Tamil, Muslim or Burgher? and is a journey seeking a generation who identified themselves based on kith and kin, livelihoods and hometowns as they did in times of lore and in so doing it sheds light on questions about identity and experiences of conflict.

Kannan Arunasalam’s journey took him to Jaffna, Kandy and Galle, where he visited churches, kovils, temples and mosques and was welcomed into people’s homes and workplaces. He met and photographed elders; many wise men and women who trusted him with their life stories.

Also here’s another video snippet (1m 13s) with Nigel Sense (Australia) – one of the featured artists at the Colombo Art Biennale 2012.

Filed under: Art Fairs & Biennales, Podcasts, short films Tagged: Annoushka Hempel, art biennale, Australia, Colombo Art Biennale 2012, Kannan Arunasalam, Miranda Gavin, Nigel Sense, Sri Lanka

This Must Be the Place: COFFER

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Video by Lost & Found Films

"We look at working in documentaries almost like a passport that allows us to see how different people live, across cultural, class, socioeconomic and racial lines. And what better way to sum up that idea than explore people's spaces: their home, their place of work, their hangout spot — to really examine, both visually and emotionally, the places that people LIVE. So we decided to make that the focus of our series, This Must Be The Place." — Ben Wu

Filmmakers Ben Wu and David Usui's This Must Be the Place is a series of short films that explores the idea of home; what makes them, how they represent us, and why we need them. Their most recent installment, Coffer is a meditative portrayal of tintype photographer John Coffer's rural home and workspace in upstate New York. Living off the grid, in a cabin he built by hand more than two decades years ago, the artists explains the philosophy behind his way of life, and his thoughts on the nature of home, while the camera drifts through his space, capturing glimpses of him at work and at rest.