Tag Archives: School Of The Museum Of Fine Arts

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber

Record Player,
Boston, 2003
From the Countrypolitan series
Website – MatthewGamber.com

Matthew Gamber (b. 1977) holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University, and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts / Tufts University. Recent exhibitions include: Second Nature: Abstract Photography Then and Now, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012 The 2012 deCordova Biennial, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012; Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, Magenta Foundation, Toronto, CA, 2011; The Sum of All Colors, Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York, 2011. Awards include: Traveling Fellowship, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2011; Humble Art Foundation, New Photography Grant, 2011; Grant Recipient, LEF Foundation, New England (awarded for Big RED & Shiny), 2007 & 2005.

Latin America Week: Guillermo Srodek-Hart

This week, Argentinean photographer Eleonora Ronconi is taking over as guest curator, featuring work created by Latin American photographers…

Guillermo es el quinto fotógrafo de la semana, y ya sólo queda uno…

Guillermo Srodek-Hart is an Argentinean photographer, who grew up and lives in Buenos Aires. His series Stories is about old stores that are located in rural areas. Nostalgia runs very strongly in the Latin DNA, and I think his series is a perfect example of this. Every time I look at these images, I remember what these places smell like and how people dressed at the time even though they are not present in these photographs. They transport me to a different place and time… 
Guillermo has an MFA from Mass College of Art in Boston, MA. He has been exhibited in many venues around the world, and his work has been published by O Globo, Fotografia Argentina, Boston Globe and Art Matters Magazine and several Argentinean newspapers. He is part of several collections such as the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Attleboro Museum of Art and Fundación Petrobras. In the United States he is represented by Dina Mitrani Gallery in Miami, Schneider Gallery in Chicago and Gallery Kayafas in Boston.

Image from Stories
What
does your Latin heritage bring to your work?

I
discovered my Latin heritage while living in Boston as un undergrad
at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. The questions about my
origin and my identity came when I was far from them. But I don’t see
myself Latin in the way I photograph. On the contrary, I feel closer
to FSA photographers. If I were living in some other place I would
probably be drawn to the same subject matter. 

Do
you see a difference between work created in Latin America and work
created in the States?


I
am not sure, because there is so much information coming and going
all the time that the influences cross over constantly. But I do see
that there is less of an academic influence here than in the US.
Here, still, people who want to learn photography have to figure out a way
to make it work for them, as opposed to the huge structure that the
Art Schools offer to a student in the US, where it is a safer environment (while you are enrolled). After graduation, it is a whole
different story. I think there is a lot of regurgitation going on in
the US Art Schools but I also think this is inevitable.  


What
is the state of photography in your country–is it well supported,
are galleries selling, do Photographers have an outlet to show their
work?


There
is a lot of interest in the medium, and there are great venues to
exhibit. There are also excellent teachers and very talented young
and not so young photographers. But I think the market is not very
good here. People will fill up a gallery at the opening, then
throughout the month it will be very visited, but perhaps there are
no sales. And now the dollar is crazy here so I dont know what will
happen. A lot of collectors from abroad come here to buy cheap and
good work.

Images from Stories

 I
drive to the small rural towns in the Argentine countryside to get
away from what I know. For me, being uncomfortable stimulates
creativity. When I enter unknown territory, I stop, get out, and talk
to people. I tell them I am interested in old stores, places that
still function almost in a separate time, those that remain
authentic, running on their own agendas.
 
I
want to find places that remain authentic, that are running on their
own agendas. Sometimes I think I am photographing the last rebel’s
strongholds, or artists’ studios, because these places seem to
operate by a different set of rules.  When I run out of words, I
take my folder out and show prints of previous shots I’ve taken, like
a detective sharing evidence. 
I
am looking for places like these
,
I ask while flipping through the photographs.  My project takes
on a collaborative nature because I rely on these interactions, the
people I meet point me to new locations, and that’s how I build my
itinerary.
 
Many times
I am asked ‘Why aren’t there any people in your photographs?’ 
My answer
is ‘Look closely, they are all over the place.’
 
My
photographs are filled with traces of human presence: objects,
furniture, stuff hanging from the walls, accumulations on display.
They speak to me of the invisible, that which can’t be seen but is
there, stories to be imagined, and, ultimately, the acknowledgement
of our own transience in this world.



Matthew Gamber

One of the best rewards of being in Boston last week was meeting photographers.  I’ve been a fan of Matthew Gamber and his compelling imagery that challenges us to rethink how we see, think about and perceive color, so it was great to finally put a name to a face at the Flash Forward Festival.

Matthew holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts/Tufts University.  His star is on the rise as his work seems to be everywhere: included in the 2012 deCordova Biennial, the the Abstract Photography Then and Now exhibition at the deCordova, at the Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, and last year at the Sasha Wolf Gallery in New York.  He has also been granted numerous awards and fellowships, and just got off the plane from Santa Fe, where he attended Review Santa Fe.

Matthew’s new project, Any Color You Like, is a bit like losing the sense of  taste right as you are about to bite into something you have been looking forward to eating, and the expectation of that enjoyment usually comes from the memory of having eaten it before.  By removing the memory and one of the senses, the experience changes. Matthew’s images look at objects that we have traditionally seen in color and that speak to the idea of color, and force us to see and think about them anew.  It’s a terrific project that challenges our perceptions, pays homage to an era where all objects were captured in black and white, but also creates tension (the bird image particularly) where the mind leads one to wonder about the image in color.  

The photographs in Any Color You Like are an experiment in how photography can confuse our perception of information. These photographs represent objects whose primary function is to simulate our observation of color. When these items are rendered in a traditional black–and–white format, the information that remains is merely an abstraction of its previous form.

Shane Lavalette, Will with Banjo

Shane Lavalette, Will with Banjo

Shane Lavalette

Will with Banjo,
, 2011
From the Picturing the South series
Website – ShaneLavalette.com

Shane Lavalette is a photographer, the founding Publisher and Editor of Lay Flat as well as the Associate Director of Light Work. Lavalette grew up in Vermont and is currently based in Upstate New York. He holds a BFA from Tufts University in partnership with The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Lavalette’s photographs have been shown widely, including national and international exhibitions. A new body of work by Lavalette will be on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA from June 9 – September 2, 2012. Lavalette has launched a Kickstarter campaign to support the funding of a photobook of this new work.

Sarah Malakoff

Sarah Malakoff’s photographs explore the idea of home, but I am drawn to the formal study of spaces that are more than just rooms, they are rooms with elements of quirky expression, each with a surprise twist.  I have to admit it, I’d like to hang out in these homes and meet the people who created these spaces.  The lack of human evidence makes the work feel like a movie set, ready for the drama to unfold. Sarah was awarded a spot in the 2009 Critical Mass top 50 portfolios with the project, Living Arrangements, and also exhibited it at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

Sarah lives and works in Boston,
Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  She received her Master of Fine Arts
from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.  She has had numerous solo
exhibitions including the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum
of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and
Plane Space in New York, NY.  Her
photographs have recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in
Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth
Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource
Center, and Photo Center Northwest.
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: My
photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a
re-creation of the outside world. 
In my images, architecture and furnishings appear as uncanny symbols of
culture, family, and nature.  With
the intentional exclusion of human occupants, my subjects spark curious
speculation of their own.  The
private and personal are expressed in part by objects and signifiers which are displayed
versus those which are hidden; what is allowed inside, and what is kept
out.  For example, doors and
windows both frame exterior views and keep the elements at bay.  Land, weather, and wildlife are ever
present on the other side of the wall even as they are brought safely inside in
the form of pattern, simulation, and domesticated animals.  Ironically, both indoors and out
equally project artifice.
    
These pictures speak to notions of comfort, class, and style as well as universal attempts to control and transcend our environment. Tensions, and often humor, appear between absence and presence, old and new, real and surreal, permanent and transient, genuine and artificial, the domestic and the natural worlds. The desire to resolve these tensions drives the viewer to create their own narrative and imagine possible inhabitants.

Trevor Powers, Untitled

Trevor Powers, Untitled

Trevor Powers

Untitled,
Boston, 2011
From the Sleep the Clock Around series
Website – CargoCollective.com/TrevorPowers

Trevor Powers (b. 1985) is a photographer and curator based in Boston, Massachusetts. He studied photography at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, where he graduated in 2008. His work is primarily based around travel and the relationships, connections, and routines of everyday life. He is interested in exploring America, collaboration, zines, and creating community and sharing work through events and shows he curates. Most recently, he launched the All Visual Boston Slideshow, a series of one-night only, digitally projected group shows featuring the recent work of local and international artists.   

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff

Untitled Interior (blizzard),
Roslindale, Massachusetts, 2005
From the Living Arrangements series
Website – SarahMalakoff.com

Sarah Malakoff is a photographer who lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She received her Master of Fine Arts from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Her photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a re-creation of the outside world. She has had solo exhibitions at the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and Plane Space in New York, NY. Her photographs have also recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource Center, and Photo Center Northwest.

Photographer #310: Lalla Essaydi

Lalla Essaydi, 1956, is a fine art photographer from Morocco. She received an MFA at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Besides photography she uses other media as painting, film and installations. Her art often contains islamic calligraphy in combination with the representation of the female body. She addresses the complex reality of the Arab female identity. She has looked at the western painting tradition, recreating the paintings in an orientalist setting. In Les Femmes du Maroc, all the props used, including the background and the clothes, are covered in caligraphy. The calligraphy is even on the bodies of the females with the use of henna. Essaydi has exhibited extensively, is represented by numerous galleries and her work is in private and public collections. The following images come from the series Les Femmes du Maroc and Harem.

Unfortunately Lalla does not have a website. For more images go to: www.schneidergallerychicago.comwww.houkgallery.comwww.artnet.com or www.lisasettegallery.com