Tag Archives: Savannah College

Robert Herman: The New Yorkers

Brooklyn born photographer, Robert Herman began working as an usher at a movie theater owned
by his parents. The exposure to a wide range of films during his formative
years provided him with a unique vision: “Working for my father allowed me to
view the same movie repeatedly,” he recalls, “until the story line began to
recede and the images became independent of the narrative.” 



Robert received a BFA in film making from the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and received his Masters in Digital Photography from the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  Later as a production still photographer on
independent feature films, Herman discovered the life at the periphery of film
locations was more compelling than the film sets. His book of his NYC color street photographs, The New Yorkers, to be self-published in the fall of 2013 with help from a successful Kickstarter campaign. His is currently also working with Fractured Atlas to defray additional costs and accepting additional tax deductible donations.
His work is part of the permanent collections of the George
Eastman House and the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA. His photographs are also
in many private collections and has exhibited across the United States including
the Museum of Modern Art, the galleries of the Savannah College of Art &
Design, The Los Angeles Center for Digital Art and The Henry Gregg Gallery in
DUMBO. This spring, photographs from The
New Yorkers
were included in a traveling exhibition that originated at the
Istanbul Photography Museum, and then moved to Ankara, Turkey with more venues
to be announced in the coming months.

The New Yorkers

New
York City is like a diamond mine. The pressure will turn one into coal dust or
a multi-faceted jewel. To survive with some sort of evolving grace, it is
absolutely essential to cultivate a Zen-like awareness. Consciously choosing to
be in a state of openness is also useful for making photographs. To paraphrase
the art critic John Berger: A photograph that surprises the photographer when
he makes it, in turn surprises the viewer. No matter how hardened and cynical
one becomes, the act of taking a picture, forces one to try to return to an
innocent wonder. Every time I go out to make photographs, I ask myself this
question: Can I see the world with vulnerability and clarity?

The
New Yorkers is a body of work that I began when I was still a student at NYU,
when I was learning to be a photographer. I was living in Little Italy at the
time and everyone around me seemed to be a subject: the man who changed tires,
the superintendent of the building next door.  I discovered Harry Callahan’s magnificent book: Color and
Robert Frank’s The Americans. These images opened my mind to what a strong
photograph could be. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then this
was my starting point. Both of these photographers re-made the mundane, the
ordinary and the everyday and transformed them into small and transcendent
jewels.

Over
the years, I lived in several different apartments and I continued making pictures
in whatever neighborhood I happened to be living in. Becoming comfortable in my
new surroundings would ease the way for me to make the authentic photographs I
was seeking. Key to this body of work was letting the subject matter determine
the outcome. I would make myself available, allowing my intuition to be my guide
and let the content rise to the surface. The true epiphany was not to embellish
or to judge: with the removal of the internal impediment strong subject matter
would speak for itself. Like a man searching for water in the desert with a
dousing rod, I became a vessel and allowed the images to pass through me onto
the film.

As an illustration of this, “Eldorado” was made
on a day when I was sitting around my loft with my girl friend at the time when
suddenly I said, “ I’ll be right back, I have to go out and take some
pictures.” Ann nodded her ascent and with my Nikon F in hand, I walked around
the corner onto Mulberry Street. 
In the bright afternoon sun two luxury cars were parked angling in from
the street towards a large green garage door. I chose my framing just as two
boys walked into the shot and I made my picture.  I was back at home five minutes later and knew I had captured
something truly special. I was at a loss to explain what had just happened. It
was truly a mystery. I realized that if I were wiling to relinquish some
control, I would occasionally be rewarded with strong photographs.
I went out to search for water
in order to survive, and I was led to something shining down from the sky
and bubbling
up from the ground.

There
is synchronicity and coincidence present everywhere. Photographs are a way of
revealing hidden relationships that are only present for a moment in space and
time, seen from a unique vantage point. The New Yorkers is the record of my
self-discovery as a photographer, inside and out, manifested on the streets of
New York City.

Ashley Kauschinger

One of the great pleasures of attending the SPE (Society of Photographic Educators) Conference in San Francisco, was the Friday night Portfolio Walk, where hundreds of students and educators spread their work onto long tables in the atrium lobby of the hotel where conference was taking place. When I arrived at Ashley Kauschinger’s table, her project, Hot Skin, looked familiar (she has been featured in Lenscratch exhibitions), but more importantly, it stood out from the sea of surrounding images because of her ability to infuse light and drama into her evocative work.

Ashley lives and works in Denton, Texas. She is a fine art photographer who creates autobiographical staged dramas. Her current focus is the investigation of daily life that results in ambiguous narrative images. She received her BFA in photography from Savannah College of Art in Design in 2011, and is currently studying with Susan kae Grant in pursuit of an MFA in photography from Texas Woman’s University. Ashley has recently received recognition from Photographer’s Forum, National Geographic and PDN. Currently her work can be found in Emerging Photographer magazine, in the exhibition, Intimacy and Voyeurism at Rayko Gallery in San Francisco and ONWARD Compe at Basho Projects in Philadelphia, both exhibits juried by Todd Hido. Upcoming, she will be in the PDN Photo Annual as a Student Winner, will be in the exhibition, In Your Dreams at PhotoPlace Gallery, juried by Susan Burnstine which opens April 17th. Her work is also in the online exhibitions iSpy: Camera Phone Photography and Both Sides of the Lens through the Kiernan Gallery in Virginia.

Hot Skin is an investigation of everyday life that reflects upon the past and the present. The series shares commonplace emotions and moments that overlap with the lives of others and connect those lives in understanding. This connection is created through a set of themes and symbols that are present throughout the series. Implemented themes include sex, long distance communication, domestic living, relationships and moments of transition.

These themes are examined through ambiguous, narrative self-portraits and still lives within personal environments. Each of these narratives has a sense of tension to create an emotional atmosphere to reflect upon. Tension is formed in each image by pinpointing a moment between two places or times, staging scenes with layered meanings that pull against each other, and using available light at sunset. Symbols representing a personal mythology such as cloth, food and hair are also present and repeated throughout the series to create a sense of familiarity with the viewer.

Wendy Given, I Am That Merry Wanderer of the Night

Wendy Given, I Am That Merry Wanderer of the Night

Wendy Given

I Am That Merry Wanderer of the Night,
Caldera/Blue Lake, Sisters, Oregon, 2010
From the How to Explain Magic to a Dead Rabbit series
Website – WendyGiven.com

Wendy Given was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1971. Given received her Master’s of Fine Arts from Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, California and her Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from the Atlanta College of Art in Atlanta, GA (now the Savannah College of Art and Design). Her work in photography, video and sculpture has been exhibited in Germany, The Netherlands and nationally. Given's work in photography will be included in the 10th Northwest Biennial at the Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, Washington in January 2012 as well as an upcoming solo exhibition at Nationale in Portland, Oregon in February. Given is a Portland, Oregon based visual artist where her work is produced with her husband, two dogs and cat.

Photographer #368: Greg Manis

Greg Manis, 1975, is an American photographer who studied at the Savannah College of Art & Design. After completing his studies he moved to New York City to assist top photographers as Tom Munro and others. Although often named a “fashion” photographer, he considers himself to be a fine art photographer. He takes portraits of the girls that remind him of his childhood while growing up in a trailer park in Northwest Georgia with his family. His interest lies in the sexy, tough girls he was once afraid to approach yet longed to be with. His work is raw, playful, edgy and gives the viewer a glimpse into Manis’ life. Greg has worked for clients as Nike and appeared in V Magazine and Inked to name a few. The following images come from his portfolios Sex, Drugs and Rock N’ Roll.

Website: www.gregmanis.com

Photographer #368: Greg Manis

Greg Manis, 1975, is an American photographer who studied at the Savannah College of Art & Design. After completing his studies he moved to New York City to assist top photographers as Tom Munro and others. Although often named a “fashion” photographer, he considers himself to be a fine art photographer. He takes portraits of the girls that remind him of his childhood while growing up in a trailer park in Northwest Georgia with his family. His interest lies in the sexy, tough girls he was once afraid to approach yet longed to be with. His work is raw, playful, edgy and gives the viewer a glimpse into Manis’ life. Greg has worked for clients as Nike and appeared in V Magazine and Inked to name a few. The following images come from his portfolios Sex, Drugs and Rock N’ Roll.

Website: www.gregmanis.com