Tag Archives: Royal Wedding

Simone Massera

This is the final post exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

London based photographer, Simone Massera, was born in Rome and claims that he once walked from coast to coast in Italy (even though it’s a short distance). Prior to pursuing a career in documentary photography, Simone studied sociology, psychology and communication and spent some time working in marketing and advertising. All of these interests have led to exploring “what it is to be a fucking human being.” He is interested in portraying the subjective perceptions of social issues and looking at how online life affects our psyches. Simone received his BA in Communication Sciences and his MA in Marketing and Brand Management at the Università degli studi di Roma, La Sapienza and an MA in Photojournalism & Documentary Photography, Distinction, London College of Communication. He has exhibited across Europe.

I am not what you see and hear [2011]
Loneliness is not a function of solitude. It’s not about being alone; it’s about feeling alone. Our world is mediated through our individual and always subjective perception of it, giving us the illusion of being the absolute centre of the universe. This makes us feel we are special and unique. With this uniqueness comes a sense of being always lonely. We seek love and acceptance wherever we can find it in order to transcend our loneliness. Filling our lives with online friends and pursuing these kinds of relationships, we often use the superficiality of digital interactions as an anaesthetic against this condition, this existential angst.

I am not what you see and hear is a project about these very connections. The use of the webcam on video chat websites that randomly pair strangers, allowed me to freeze brief moments of waiting and expectation right before the appearance of another new face on the screen. Through the gaze of hundreds of people portrayed on these websites the project aims to give you an imagined access to other selves, in an attempt to provoke reflection and compassion. Looking at these private spaces, these empty rooms, desks and beds, lets you peek into these strangers’ lives, see what they see everyday, imagine their thoughts, their fears and expectations.

This project owes much of its inspiration to the work and truly compassionate vision of life of David Foster Wallace.

Since I believe the experience of a work of art being strongly influenced by the medium we use, I specifically designed the digital output of this project to be viewed on screen.

Hannah Lucy Jones

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

London photographer, Hannah Lucy Jones, studied at English and Philosophy at Leeds University, though found her way to the visual world and decided to pursue photography as a career after being shortlisted in the Times Young Photographer of the Year Award in 2005. From there she attended the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) photo-journalism course at Norton College, Sheffield, and has been employed as a press photographer since 2006. Her photographs have appeared in The Sunday Times Magazine, The Times, The Guardian, and The Sunday Telegraph, amongst others.

To enrich Hannah’s ability to create in-depth storytelling , she received her MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication. Her project featured below, To happiness, endlessly, is a chronicle of a solitary journey she made around England, and was intended to evoke her emotional state as she travelled. This project was recently selected for the Foto8 Summer Show at Host Gallery, London, and was featured in BBC coverage of the show.

To happiness, endlessly: To happiness, endlessly, is a series of encounters from a journey around England. Curious about this country I’m from, a little lost in my own life, and feeling unable to make decisions, I opted to travel with no planned route or destination. Instead I was led by the suggestions of the people I met, many of whom spoke to me of their dreams and sorrows. With no intention to characterise the English as a nation, or England as a country, the trip was imagined more as a series of disconnected experiences joined by their happening within Englandʼs borders, a melancholic psychological journey, and a visual diary of what I saw, who I met, and where I went.

Though this was a personal journey, the photographs and stories I collected on the way explore a universal emotional landscape. The project is true to the melancholic feeling I found almost everywhere as I travelled. In the people I spoke to, the places I visited, the stories I heard, there was a common sense of sadness, fading hope, dissatisfaction, hard times. Thus the images are less a document of the nation, and more a psychological journey through its’ mind, using the physical journey around England to locate itself. The final edit reflects this rather melancholic nature.

Samuel Bland

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

Based in London, Samuel Bland is freelance and fine art photographer and a teacher. “If he hadn’t been a photographer Samuel would have gone into thinking about stuff a lot. He sometimes takes himself off round the country on foot, with only a tent and a camera for company.” Samuel’s work focuses on identity, ecology and the relationship between man and his environment. He interested in combining media – still and moving image, text and sound – to create unusual bodies of work that explore these issues. Samuel graduated with a Distinction from the MA Documentary Photography course at London College of Communication. He has exhibited in the UK and Ireland and was recently selected for the Magenta Foundation’s Emerging Photographers for 2011.

Samuel has a number of interesting series, including the one that follows, The Long Walk Back, documenting a 500 mile walk back to his roots. If you need the text larger, simply click on the image.

The Long Walk Back: The Long Walk Back is a document of an unusual journey through England: a 500-mile walk, back to the place where I came into the world.

It came out of a desire both to confront my own memories and identity and explore the character of my country and it’s people as they are today – hoping that these two strands would overlap and that I would learn something about each.

This desire emerged out of a sense of disconnection from belonging to a place, or a people, or from the notion of being English. Conversations I had with others suggested this was not an uncommon set of feelings, and so I decided to try to discover what it was, if anything, that connected people to a place and to each other, in this country in this time.

So I decided to quite literally go back to my roots: to walk from my place of residence (on the South Coast) to the place where I was born (just shy of the northern border) through all the places I had lived in-between. This would take me through a huge swathe of the country: cities and villages, fields and forests, national parks and industrial wastelands.

The journey took 54 days, during which time I only walked, avoiding all vehicular transport, motorized or otherwise. I was especially drawn to the idea of walking through the country rather than driving around it or taking public transport; of seeing the whole thing, the places in-between places, and of connecting with something more ancient in it, through travelling in the most ancient and innately human way there is.

I documented the journey in photographs and words (on a blog), and the finished project includes words, images, a graphic representation of my trajectory through the country, as well as old photographs from my past and that of my family.

I am particularly interested in the play of meaning that can occur between paired images and words. The resulting project is not a definitive visual record of England today, or a rational examination of the development of English identity, but a personal view of the country glimpsed through fragments of thought, memory and of course vision.

TIME Picks the Best Viral Photos of 2011

Spontaneous snapshots. Intimate moments. Unexpected exposures. There was no one formula for this year’s most viral photographs. Most were based on news events, such as the death of longtime Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi—but these photos ended up becoming the news themselves. They shocked us. They awed us. They inspired us to feel. But the most powerful feeling was the impulse to share.

The best viral images of 2011 are those we found flooding our email inboxes and Twitter feeds this year. One thing weaves the images together: each photographer netted a once-in-a-lifetime picture. From Royal Wedding mania and a bloodied despot to an utterly unexpected leopard on the loose, photographers both professional and amateur brought us the scenes of unpredictability and chaos that gripped our world over the past 12 months. As shocking as the subject matter is the simplicity of some images. A few came from mobile phones. Most were snapped without a thought of—or time to handle—composition or lighting. One was even taken by a man who would be dead minutes later.

Given that the Internet is a notoriously fickle beast, it’s impossible to predict which photos will score a hit. Here, LightBox looks back on the photos we couldn’t help but share. —Nick Carbone

Teresa Cos

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

Teresa Cos was born in Latisana, a small town in the north east of Italy. While she was studying as an architecture student, she began to develop a passion for art and sociology, and changed her focus to photography as a way to express her viewpoints on society. After graduating, she was part of an Italian team of architects commissioned by the French government to produce ideas for the future of Paris. She lived for seven months outside of Paris and created her first major body of work, which led to her to attending the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography MA program at London College of Communication. Now living in London, Teresa continues to be interested in the social behaviors and statuses that result from the promises of freedom and success typical of western societies.

Teresa’s work has been published and exhibited both in Italy and the UK. Her work was recently featured in Aperture’s What Matters Now and Teresa won the Fondazione Bevilacqua la Masa for the 95th Young Artists Collective Exhibition’s 1st prize award. She exhibited at Photo Ireland Festival with the collective Five Eleven Ninety Nine and has been awarded the Honourable Mention by the Magenta Foundation with her project I Was There. The images featured below are from her series, Through the Spaces Between Moments.

THROUGH THE SPACES BETWEEN MOMENTS. Beauty. Nature. History. Knowledge. The Unpredictable. There is a sense of inexplicable fulfilment each time that we recognise these features in everyday life, when we realise that for a fleeting moment we unconsciously got in touch with a deeper understanding of who and why we are. We are born and we die. For as long as we can remember we have been trying to make sense of that. As of yet, we have not been lucky enough to find any satisfying answers. Since there is no way to envision the future, men is left helpless with history and the present. Men build museums to gather the memory and the grandeur of human kind. They inspire people and give them the means to lay the foundations for the next generation.

We create environments where we can admire the beauty of nature, where we can get in touch with the incredible wonders the world provides for us. All of this to create a sense of belonging and wholeness, both because men are often scared of isolation and because we naturally fall into the temptation of wanting to give The Answer to our existence. What if the wholeness of our existence was made instead of little pieces, instants, encounters, that if we were able to recognise would reveal the most precious thing we have; the ability to perceive with deep emotion sudden moments that are speaking some indescribable truth. And cling to them.

Jonny Cochrane

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

Jonny Cochrane is a London based photographer whose personal work examines people, places and experiences with an often peculiar nature. He’s busy looking at a little bit of everything, capturing the absurdity of modern civilization with a curled lip and a big grin. He finds inspiration in photography’s ability to elevate the mundane and uses atmosphere and mood to create narratives that are suggestive rather than explicit. Jonny graduated from the London College of Communication with distinction with an MA in Photojournalism & Documentary Photography. Besides working as an editorial and commercial photographer, he has exhibited in England, Ireland, and Finland.

I Want That: Our default condition is one of wanting. Often, we foolishly pander to our desire to have by attempting to get a little closer to the people, places and objects that we believe are symbolic of fulfillment, satisfaction, success and happiness. All characteristics of the life we endeavor to live.

Dreamy wanderings amongst the opulent surroundings of London’s most luxurious neighbourhoods begin with an uplifting pleasure in the allure of clean white stone against immaculate green privet, gold trim on black glass, impossibly glossy shop window displays and deliciously colourful confectionary. Rapidly the pleasure is tarnished by an awareness of the distance between us and them. We are reminded of the disdain we feel for our current situation as the lure of the beautiful luxuries fuels our hankering for a ‘better’ life. It is all so painfully out of reach. Abrupt self-awareness follows with a sense of shame brought on by the ease in which we have been so senselessly seduced.

Due to the democratic nature of all elements within the frame, the photographic image encourages us to interpret what we consider right before our eyes with autonomy. Rather than being senselessly, yet often subconsciously seduced by the opulence surrounding us, we have the opportunity to scrutinise, just as the camera does, every detail of the things that ordinarily
and routinely are the catalyst for that wanton desire to grab a hold of what we do not have. Perhaps we then discover something less familiar. These photographs encourage us to consider the absurdity of our methods and irrationality of our misguided appetite for that taste of happiness. The happiness we dream of obtaining when we are one day able to wrap ourselves up in the lavishly coloured, fine textured cloak of luxury.

I hope that in these photographs of beautiful things, there is another kind of beauty.

Jonny Cochrane

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

Jonny Cochrane is a London based photographer whose personal work examines people, places and experiences with an often peculiar nature. He’s busy looking at a little bit of everything, capturing the absurdity of modern civilization with a curled lip and a big grin. He finds inspiration in photography’s ability to elevate the mundane and uses atmosphere and mood to create narratives that are suggestive rather than explicit. Jonny graduated from the London College of Communication with distinction with an MA in Photojournalism & Documentary Photography. Besides working as an editorial and commercial photographer, he has exhibited in England, Ireland, and Finland.

I Want That: Our default condition is one of wanting. Often, we foolishly pander to our desire to have by attempting to get a little closer to the people, places and objects that we believe are symbolic of fulfillment, satisfaction, success and happiness. All characteristics of the life we endeavor to live.

Dreamy wanderings amongst the opulent surroundings of London’s most luxurious neighbourhoods begin with an uplifting pleasure in the allure of clean white stone against immaculate green privet, gold trim on black glass, impossibly glossy shop window displays and deliciously colourful confectionary. Rapidly the pleasure is tarnished by an awareness of the distance between us and them. We are reminded of the disdain we feel for our current situation as the lure of the beautiful luxuries fuels our hankering for a ‘better’ life. It is all so painfully out of reach. Abrupt self-awareness follows with a sense of shame brought on by the ease in which we have been so senselessly seduced.

Due to the democratic nature of all elements within the frame, the photographic image encourages us to interpret what we consider right before our eyes with autonomy. Rather than being senselessly, yet often subconsciously seduced by the opulence surrounding us, we have the opportunity to scrutinise, just as the camera does, every detail of the things that ordinarily
and routinely are the catalyst for that wanton desire to grab a hold of what we do not have. Perhaps we then discover something less familiar. These photographs encourage us to consider the absurdity of our methods and irrationality of our misguided appetite for that taste of happiness. The happiness we dream of obtaining when we are one day able to wrap ourselves up in the lavishly coloured, fine textured cloak of luxury.

I hope that in these photographs of beautiful things, there is another kind of beauty.

Are You In This Picture?

From rallies and revolutions to weddings and celebrations, TIME has photographed all the big news events of the year. Now we want to know if we photographed you.

We’re asking readers to head over to a dedicated photo album on TIME’s Facebook page and tag themselves if they appear in these pictures—some of our favorites from 2011. This is all part of a new ongoing project from TIME, one that we hope tells the story behind our iconic photography from the people who were there.

To participate, visit TIME’s Facebook album and flip through the images. We’ve provided dates and locations on each picture to ease the search, but we’d also love your help getting the word out about the project. Please considering sharing this story with friends and family on your favorite social networks.

– The editors