Tag Archives: Row Seat

Susan Swihart

Los Angeles photographer Susan Swihart has a front row seat as she observes the phenomenon of identical twins.  She has begun a long-term project, About Face, that documents her daughters where she explores the nuances of their similarities and differences. She reveals just enough to give us insight, but also leaves space for their privacy.

Born and raised in Newton, Massachusetts, Susan was raised by a large extended family where her solace was time spent with paint brush and pencil. After college, she began a career in advertising and now works as a fine art photographer. Susan will be exhibiting in the Family Exhibition, opening at the Detroit Center for Photography in January, and her work has been exhibited across the country and often seen in F Stop Magazine.

About Face

Sometimes two people start as one. They split apart, but continue to grow in parallel day by day, inch by inch. They develop separately and distinctly. They have different dreams and fears. Yet, to many, they will always look the same. Be interchangeable. Be treated as if they’re still one. 

As the mother of twin daughters, I have been observing the phenomenon of their connectedness since birth. As a photographer and participant observer in their lives, I have set out to explore the psychological components, the similarities and differences, of my daughter’s union. Their realization that they are seen as one causes many different emotions. At times, they too will see themselves as a unit, but they will also wrestle with finding their own voice, identity and place.

They pull, push and compete. Occasionally one pushes ahead and grows faster than the other. One is left behind, until it’s their turn to squeeze by. Most other times they cling to the comfort of one another. The comfort in same face confusion. An ally to hide with from the fame of their twinness. It is a complex, but pure love for the person that was created at the same time. Head to toe in the womb. Side by side in life. And I want to be their witness and chronicle their unique journey into the world of individuals.

Tracy Fleischman Morgenthau

The Olympic games have officially ended and for Los Angeles photographer, Tracy Fleischman Morgenthau, it was a happy accident that work and life has her living in London for a number of months.  Tracy had a front row seat to witness the cultural impact that the games had on the city and people of London.  She has created a project titled, Olympic Culture, and these are images hot off the press.

Tracy has always been fascinated by the connection between social change and culture.  She received a degree in History from UC Berkeley, and an MA in American Studies at UT, Austin, where she worked as a fellow at the Harry Ransom Center, curating exhibitions and working with the collections.  For the past several years, in addition to working as a fine art photographer, Tracy has worked as a media and campaign strategist for leading NGO’s and documentary filmmakers creating campaigns for groups such as Women’s Voices Women Vote and the Media Consortium, and films like Trouble the Water and People Speak!

Images from Olympic Culture
I happen to be living in London during the 2012 Olympics. While
the athletes and the games themselves were amazing, I found myself drawn to the
culture surrounding the games.  On the streets, in the stands, in the
stores and even underground, excitement about the Olympic games swept through
London. 
As a foreigner living in London for a short time, I’d
already been observing local culture, noting and photographing the subtle but
significant differences between British and American culture.  With the
arrival of the 2012 games, I  found myself looking at something new – Olympic Culture.

The photographs in my series Olympic Culture explore the way the
2012 Olympic games manifested off the playing field. London attire, energy and
even the way strangers on the subway related to one another shifted with the
arrival of the Olympic games. People opened up, excited to connect and share in
a collective experience. The Olympics gave locals and visitors alike the
permission to take pride in their nations– with people from around the world
literally wrapping themselves in their national flag
(or a sponsor branded t-shirt)
.   It is this unique and
celebratory moment that I worked to capture while taking photographs in the two
weeks between the 2012 opening and closing Olympic ceremonies.