Tag Archives: Robert F Kennedy

Steve Schapiro, Then and Now: Rare Images from a Photography Legend

Just the list of people Steve Schapiro has photographed during his career reads like a Who’s Who of the most influential politicians, celebrities and newsmakers in American history over the last five decades. But that Schapiro captured his subjects during their pivotal and seminal moments—Robert F. Kennedy during his 1968 presidential campaign; Marlon Brando on the set of The Godfather; Andy Warhol and muse Edie Sedgwick in The Factory, among others—lends his photographs an added significance. They aren’t just remarkable portraits of remarkable people, but snapshots into our country’s historical and cultural milestones.

Schapiro’s output over his more than 50-year career has been prolific, and many people have probably seen one of his photographs whether they realize it or not. But his new book, Then and Now, gives readers a look at Schapiro’s lesser-known work; the majority of pictures have never been published. “There were so many pictures that I loved but didn’t fit with the format of my previous books, so this was a chance to bring forth that work,” he says. The book is comprised of single images shown over a spread, as well as spreads of disparate images that share a composition or theme—one such example has a portrait of Martin Scorcese holding a gun and grapes on the left page, and a portrat of Mia Farrow holding a baby on the right. “I wanted to make a book that was interesting on every page,” says Schapiro. “That evolved into the idea of working with double pages where one picture worked with another.”

Schapiro first took an interest to photography at 9 while at summer camp. He fell in love with “the magic of photography” in the dark room, where he became fascinated by how pictures came to life after being dipped in various formulas. But it wasn’t until he discovered Henri Cartier-Bresson’s The Decisive Moment, as a teenager, that his interest really took hold. He began trying to capture his own decisive moments on the streets of New York City, before going to study the formal aspects of photography under W. Eugene Smith.

In 1961, amid the height of the Civil Rights movement, Schapiro started working as a freelance photographer for publications such as LIFE, Rolling Stone, TIME and Newsweek. Over the next 10 years, which Schapiro calls “the golden age of photojournalism,” he would cover the decade’s most significant events, including Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1963 march in Selma, and later, King’s abandoned motel room after this assassination, as well as the “Summer of Love” in Haight-Asbury and Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign. “It was an incredible time to be a photojournalist because there was more of an emotional flow—an ability to do more emotional pictures that captured the spirit of a person,” says Schapiro of the period. “I was able to spend a lot of time with people—Bobby Kennedy went to South America for four weeks and I got to go with him. When I got really sick there, Ethel Kennedy brought me Bobby’s pajamas to wear. Bobby was someone who I became friends with, but everyone who worked with him loved him.”

Despite his success as a photographer, Schapiro maintains that he hasn’t taken his most important picture yet—and doesn’t have any idea what it might be. In the meantime, there’s one subject who continues to elude him: “President Barack Obama. I would love to photograph him.”


View more of Schapiro’s work here.



Documentary Film: One Thousand Pictures: RFK’s Last Journey

On June 6, 1968, in the midst of his campaign to be president of the United States, Robert F. Kennedy died from an assassin’s bullet. Two days later, after a funeral mass in New York City, his casket was placed on a special train bound for Arlington National Cemetery. A journey that should have taken hours took all day, as thousands of Americans lined the 225 miles of track in a spontaneous outpouring of grief. Paul Fusco was the only journalist on the train, and he ended up taking more than a thousand pictures from his window. These images can be seen in the Aperture publication Paul Fusco: RFK.

Now on the 43rd anniversary of the event, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart brings Fusco’s images to life. Atlanta Search engine Optimization . Personal stories are told by Fusco, and RFK’s then-press secretary, as well as by the people who appeared in Fusco’s images, recalling the emotional impact of Kennedy’s assassination on the country. The film also includes video and audio clips of Bobby Kennedy speaking so eloquently and passionately about his hopes and dreams for the country.

Watching the documentary was a moving experience for an American like me, who lived through those sad and rocky moments in America’s history. And once again, I am reminded of the power of photography to capture a mood and feeling, and how a multimedia presentation like this documentary can serve to intensify the meaning of almost each and every image.

The documentary film, ONE THOUSAND PICTURES: RFKS LAST JOURNEY, airs on Wednesday, June 8 at 8 p.m. ET. And tonight, Monday, June 6 at 6:30, Paul Fusco and filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart will host an artist’s talk and book signing at the Aperture Gallery and Bookstore in Chelsea. zoekmachine optimalisatie . 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor.

The trailer for this film can also be viewed at HBO.

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

One Thousand Pictures: R.F.K’s Last Journey, Film and Panel Discussion

On June 6, 1968, in the midst of his campaign for president, Robert F. Kennedy died from an assassin’s bullet. Two days later, on June 8, after a funeral mass in New York City, his casket was placed on a special train bound for Arlington National Cemetery. A journey that should have taken hours took all day, as thousands of Americans lined the 225 miles of track in a spontaneous outpouring of grief. Photographer Paul Fusco was on the train, and ended up taking more than a thousand pictures from his window. These images can be seen in the Aperture publication Paul Fusco: RFK.

Now, on the 43rd anniversary of the event, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart and HBO brig Fusco’s images to life. Told by those who appeared in Fusco’s images as they stood on the tracks 43 years ago, One Thousand Pictures: R.F.K’s Last Journey chronicles the complex impact of Kennedy’s assassination on the country.

Aperture is honored to host a panel discussion featuring Magnum photographer Paul Fusco, filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart, and gallertist James Danziger to discuss the images and their ongoing impact.

In 2008 Aperture published Paul Fusco: RFK during the fortieth anniversary of Robert F. Kennedy’s assassination in Los Angeles while campaigning for the presidential nomination, is the long-awaited follow-up to Fusco’s acclaimed RFK Funeral Train, a body of work heralded as a contemporary classic. This historical new publication features over seventy never-before-seen images, many selected from the untapped treasure trove of slides that comprise the Library of Congress’s Look Magazine Photograph Collection.

Paul Fusco a member of Magnum Photos since 1974, began his career photographing for the U.S. Signal Core during the Korean War. He studied photojournalism at Ohio University and his work has been widely published and exhibited, including exhibitions at the Photographers’ Gallery, London, and the International Festival of Photojournalism, Perpignan, France.

Monday, June 6, 6:30 pm

FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
New York

Exclusive film debut on HBO2:
Wednesday, June 8, 8:00 pm.

Click here for more details about the event.

Click here to purchase a limited edition print by Paul Fusco.