Tag Archives: Robert Capa

Interviews and Talks | August 2012

Stephanie Sinclair (CNN) Interviewed about her child brides project by CNN’s Christina Amanpour

Aaron Huey (Media Bistro) ‘National Geographic’s Aaron Huey on Digital Collaboration and Community Storytelling’

Photo © Philip Blenkinsop

Gary Knight (FotoEvidence)

Andre Liohn (YouTube) The Robert Capa Gold Medal award speech

Michael Kamber (NYT Lens) on Witnessess to War book

David Turnley (CNN) ‘New doc ‘Shenandoah’ tells story of undocumented immigrant killed by teens’

Don McCullin (BBC) Desert Island Discs 1984

Photo © Alexandra Avakian

Jean-Francois Leroy (BJP) Visa pour l’Image director Jean-Francois Leroy interviewed by our very own Olivier Laurent!

Luke Sharrett (Photo Brigade) ‘Traveling Aboard Air Force One’

Luke Sharrett (PDN) “The College Kid Whose Obama Photo Landed in The New Yorker”

James Estrin (burn)

The Bystanders: photographers who didn’t step in to help (Guardian) “What’s it like to witness a mob attack, a starving child or the aftermath of a bomb, and take a photograph instead of stopping to help? As two journalists are under fire for recording rather than intervening in a sex attack in India, we ask people who know”

Lauren Greenfield  (Phoenix.com) on The Queen of Versailles

Photo © Martin Parr

Martin Parr (Ideas Tap) Parr on Abstract painting with abstract shirt

Steve McCurry (Ideas Tap ) McCurry on ‘Dust Storm, Rajasthan, India’

Alex Webb (PDN) Webb on His Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

Stanley Greene (PDN) Greene on Luck, Film and Supporting Young Photographers

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman, Mark Power and Stuart Franklin (IdeasTap)  ’Magnum photographers on their craft ‘

Edward Burtynsky (Metro)  Burtynsky: “Photographers’ Gallery will be an exciting new space”

Robin Hammond (nzherald.co.nz) ‘The Zimbabwe Mugabe didn’t want you to see’

Jacob Aue Sobol : Arrivals and Departures pt6 (Leica blog)

Josef Koudelka (Vogue.it)

Jodi Bieber (Ted.com)

Tewfic El-Sawy (Auto de Fe)

Lucas Foglia (Guardian) ‘photographer in search of off-the-grid Americans’

Mark Seliger in conversation with Platon and Dylan McDermott (Capture: episode 1 on YouTube)

Jonathan Torgovnik (FK Magazine)

John Cantlie (DailyBeast) “Journalist John Cantlie Learned How Deadly Syria Can Be When He Was Held Hostage by Jihadis”

John Cantlie (Channel 4 News) Cantlie about having been held captive in Syria

Bruce Gilden (Magnum Photos blog)

Jonas Bendiksen (Leica Vimeo)

Photo © Kate Peters

Kate Peters (Hasselblad blog) ‘Kate Peters and her trusty Hasselblad have just completed a marathon project to photograph an impressive line up of Olympic hopefuls for a huge spread in The Guardian’s Weekend supplement.’

Al Bello (NYT) ‘To Get the Shot, Nerve, Luck and Scuba Gear’

Doug Mills (NYT Lens) ‘Photographing the Olympics: The 400-Millimeter Dash’

Tony Hicks, AP’s regional photo editor for Europe and Africa (AP) Men’s 100m final “As well as 18 photographers, AP had 20 remote cameras placed in every imaginable shooting position.”

Photo © David Burnett / Contact Press Images

David Burnett (NYT Lens) ‘An Olympic Photographer’s Endurance’

Gregory Bull (Youtube) ‘AP Photographer Gregory Bull shot one of the iconic images of the London Games Thursday. He explains how he got that magical shot of Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas high over the balance beam.’

Jonathan Klein (CNN video posted on Photo Archive News) ‘Getty Images CEO Jonathan Klein on Getty’s involvement in London 2012′

Photos © Martin Schoeller

Martin Schoeller (BBC) “Photographer Martin Schoeller searches for the unique in identical twins”

Kate Holt (Action Aid)

Gareth Cattermole (YouTube) “Gareth Cattermole is a Getty Images staff entertainment photographer”

Palani Mohan (Asia Society) ‘Photographer Documents Rugged Lives of Kazakh Eagle Hunters’

Ewen Spencer (We Heart)

Chloe Dewe Mathews (Picture Perfect  | Vice.com)

Diver and Aguilar (A Photo Editor)

Sean Hemmerle (PDN) ‘How Sean Hemmerle Photographed Drones’

WassinkLundgren (Unseen Amsterdam)

Stephen Wilkes (A Photo Editor)

Photo © Martin Roemers

Martin Roemers (theurbn.com)

Chris Gregory (NYT Lens)

Newsha Tavakolian (Leica blog)

Brent Lewin (Boreal Collective)

James Noble (Guardian) ‘Tetra Pak heir: how photographer snapped key shots’

Steve Giralt (Photographer’s blog)  ’The Best Photography Course I Ever Took’

Richard Koci Hernandez (LA Times Framework blog)

UPDATED: Robert Capa, Friend of Anton

Neil Harris

The first lot is auctioned off at the ‘Friends of Anton’ benefit.

UPDATE: In the first lot of the evening, the framed Robert Capa print pictured above sold for $4,500 to bidder #313, reports TIME’s Neil Harris, who was present at the event. He says that the evening was partly surprising—contemporary photojournalism at Christie’s is unprecedented—and partly somber, as Hammerl’s widow gave a speech and read a letter from their middle child to his father. Once the live auction began, “the mood became quite energized and people started bidding real money for serious pictures,” Harris says. “The first three lots together broke $10,000, which was exhilarating on all levels.”

On Tuesday evening, Christie’s will hold its first-ever auction of contemporary photojournalism prints at its New York City auction house. The event, which will be hosted by news anchor Christiane Amanpour, will benefit the family of the late Anton Hammerl. Hammerl, who had been a photographer and photo editor for outlets from the Associated Press to the The Sunday Star in Johannesburg, was killed in Libya last April. He had traveled to Libya as a freelancer to cover the conflict in that country. He was 41 years old and had three children, ages 11, 8 and 1. His remains have not yet been found.

The auction was the idea of a group of conflict journalists who originally got together, via Facebook, to sell prints to help their colleague’s loved ones. The transition from on-demand sales to planning an auction, under the banner “Friends of Anton,” happened about a month ago, and some of the most recognizable names in photojournalism have signed on to participate: João Silva, Platon, Bruce Davidson, Alec Soth, Susan Meiselas and many more.

The auction, says David Brabyn, one of the organizers, demonstrates the sense of community among photographers who put themselves at risk for their work. “It’s been quite highlighted recently,” he says, “after all the deaths of reporters, both photographers and print.”

But one of the most important prints up for bid was not a donation from someone in that community. Robert Capa’s photograph of American soldiers landing in France on D-Day is perhaps the most familiar picture in the bunch; Capa was killed by a land mine in 1954. The donation comes from the International Center of Photography, where his work is archived. (The winning bid will also include a personal tour of his archive.) ICP was founded by Capa’s brother, Cornell Capa, and the print comes from his personal collection.

Even though neither Capa brother is alive to bestow his friendship on Anton Hammerl, it’s a fitting donation, says Cynthia Young, curator of the Robert Capa Archive at ICP. Cornell Capa, she says, was generous with his prints during his lifetime—and this is a particularly poignant cause. “His brother and Anton both died while photographing overseas, doing a job they felt compassionately about. They were both committed to bringing back real stories about what was happening in the world and what they saw,” says Young. “Cornell founded ICP in part to educate people, not only about photography, but that through photography we can learn about political situations, and consequently make social and political change.”

And the picture, beyond its historical significance, has its own measure of poignancy, she adds: “It seemed like an appropriate image, one of great courage both on the part of the American soldiers and of the photographer.”

More information about the Friends of Anton auction—including ticketing and absentee bidding information—is available here.

Overseas Press Club Award Winners Announced

The Overseas Press Club of America has just announced the winners of its annual awards. LightBox presents the work of the photojournalists who were honored by the OPC, and who will be further recognized tonight at the organization’s gala.

The Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise” went to André Liohn (EPA/Prospekt) for Almost Dawn in Libya. Read more about the project here on LightBox.

The Olivier Rebbot Award for “best photographic reporting from abroad in magazines or books” went to David Guttenfelder (AP) for his work in Japan. Read more about Guttenfelder’s work here on LightBox. Sebastian Liste (Getty) and TIME’s Yuri Kozyrev (Noor) received citations for their work.

The John Faber Award for “best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers or news services” went to Pete Muller (AP) for his work in Eastern Congo. Muller was also named 2011 Wire Photographer of the Year by LightBox; read more about his work here. David Guttenfelder received a citation for his work.

The Feature Photography Award went to David Guttenfelder for his work inside North Korea. Todd Heisler (The New York Times) and Stephanie Sinclair (VII) also received citations.

The Overseas Press Club has, since 1939, been an association of journalists working in the United States and around the world. Read more about the organization here.

Two Takes: One Picture, Two Photographers

The romantic notion is that photojournalists bear unique witness to the events of the world as they unfold around them. In reality, due to circumstance, comfort and organizational requirements, photographers often find themselves in the company of fellow photojournalists, working side by side, when covering the news.

Camaraderie builds between photographers, particularly those working in the war zone. They travel together, discuss their work and often become close friends. They have a mutual respect and share a common bond: their experience of the discomforts and dangers that such work entails.

Photojournalists have always worked in close proximity on foreign assignments and most notably when covering conflict in which they face the dangers this work brings. Robert Capa, Gerda Taro and Chim (David Seymour) famously did so when making their photographs of the Spanish Civil War, including the Mexican Suitcase negatives. In fact, a number of these photographs—that had actually been shot by Taro—were for decades wrongly attributed to Capa.

In 1971, Larry Burrows was killed alongside fellow photojournalists Henri Huet, Kent Potter and Keisaburo Shimamoto—while photographing the Vietnam war—when their helicopter was shot down over Laos.

Mahmud Hams—AFP/Getty Images

Foreign photographers take cover from tear gas during clashes with riot police along a road which leads to the Interior Ministry, near Tahrir Square, in Cairo on November 23, 2011. Several thousand Egyptians rallied in Tahrir Square demanding an end to military rule, despite a promise by the country’s interim leader to transfer power to an elected president by mid-2012.

This March, photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks were two of four New York Times journalists kidnapped, beaten and held captive for six days by pro-Gaddafi forces while working in the Libyan city of Ajdabiya.

When photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were tragically killed, and fellow photographer Guy Martin seriously injured—on April 20 this year— in Libya, they were working side by side covering the rebel fight for Mistrata.

Although both Hetherington and Martin made many distinctive photographs in Libya, there were occasions when they found themselves in the same place at the same time and drawn to taking the same picture. A few months earlier,  both Hetherington and Martin had taken a similar, quite and solemn image as each other—of a dead rebel fighter. This image, as with many others shot in duplicate, is more akin to a forensic or still life study—like the aftermath of flooding or bullet holes in a wall.

In the war-zone, or amid protests and riots, there is often less time for contemplation. Images are captured in a fleeting moment—whether it’s a rocket being fired, a barking dog or a jet of pepper spray—and these photographs show that the photographers who took them were not alone.

In many cases today, photographers working in such close proximity are doing so to satisfy the insatiable appetite of the news cycle. Due to deadlines, images are filed almost immediately after they are shot. This, and the fact that photographers are often working for competing news agencies, makes it impossible for them to share their images or avoid duplication. When international journalists were put up at the five-star Rixos hotel in central Tripoli by Gaddafi’s government earlier this year, the situation resulted in guided tours that left little opportunity to make anything but similar images to each other.

From the Libyan war to the Bangkok floods, LightBox shares a small selection of photographs by some of the most accomplished photojournalists working today. Colleagues who, on occasion, over the past 12 months have found themselves in the same place, at the same time, shooting in stereo.

The Singular Approach: Chien-Chi Chang’s Contact Sheet Chronicle

From the birth of the 35mm camera until the advent of digital photography, the contact sheet has been an inextricable, ubiquitous and essential part of the photographic process.

Magnum Contact Sheets, published this month by Thames and Hudson, offers unique insight into the working process of the celebrated agency’s photographers over the past seven decades—their approach to taking and editing their pictures, as well as their idiosyncratic relationships with the contact sheet.

The book details—and in some cases reconstructs—the back-stories behind some of the 20th century’s most iconic images. From those taken in the 1930′s by Henri Cartier-Bresson—who, the book reveals, purged all but the “Decisive Moments” from his archive —and Robert Capa’s celebrated images of the D-Day landings, to the civil rights era work of Bruce Davidson and Gilles Peress’ contact sheets that document the massacre of unarmed protesters on Bloody Sunday.

Chien-Chi Chang—Magnum

A sketch from Chien-Chi Chang’s sketch book showing drawings of his single-frame series.

One of the most recent examples of work featured in the book is Chien-Chi Chang’s Home—a project that uses the contact sheet from a totally different perspective, premise and relationship to time, space and traditional sequence narrative.

In 2006, Chien-Chi Chang—who throughout his career had exclusively shot 35mm format film—embraced a new photographic pursuit, to work with a medium format 6×7 rangefinder and began his ongoing project, Home. For the series, Chang purposefully shoots a single frame of his subject to build 9 frame contact sheets—chronologies that record his personal life as a travelogue and visual diary. Chang describes the series as “a documentation of my life with an effort to make every frame count.”

“Waiting and wanting to take just one frame at a time goes against the traditional practice, where you tend to shoot more and then pick the right moment,” Chang says. “With this project, specifically, I don’t really care about the before and after anymore. I feel that one shot is enough. Sometimes I might feel I’m missing the so called ‘decisive moment,’ but when you accept that you are going to shoot this way, you accept that you will be missing something. If I get it, I get it, If I don’t, I don’t.”

Every time after he shoots a frame, Chang makes a quick sketch so that he has a visual reference of each frame. Initially Chang tried to construct shapes, connections and juxtapositions —using the sketches to build the relationships between the frames of each roll of film. Now the photographer has a much more relaxed approach. He says he is less obsessive and “just lets things happen.” He still makes the sketches, but more for practical purposes as a record of date and location. He notes what he finds most interesting is to compare the drawings to the final contact — our eyes are very selective Chang says, “but the lens isn’t.”

Chien-Chi Chang—Magnum

A stand alone frame selected by Chang from the body of the contact project.
An hours long exposure taken at Vienna Airport of light trails from the planes as Chang waited for his flight. Nov. 19, 2010.

Chang shoots 60 to 70 rolls of film a year for the project. But he has been disciplined, selective, restrained and purposeful in his approach. Sometimes a roll can be shot in three or five cities and can span for two weeks. But other times, it can be shot in a few days. There are motifs that appear across multiple contact sheets from the project—hotel beds that Chang has slept in and airports are two reoccurring themes. Over the six years of the project’s development Chang’s process has been almost always to restrict himself to making only one frame at a time. However on rare occasions, a whole roll is dedicated to a single subject— the Dalai Lama in Sao Paulo, another time, Aung San Suu Kyi in Yangon. In these exceptional cases Chang only shot the 9 frames recorded and documented on the one contact sheet. It is not a contact sheet culled from many; these are the only shots.

In the age of digital photography, the traditional contact sheet is no longer the inextricable standard in terms of working process. Chang’s work offers alternative ways of using contacts as part of a more conceptual practice.

Chien-Chi Chang is a member of Magnum Photos. He was awarded the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund for Humanistic Photography and Visa d’Or, Visa Pour L’Image in 1999. He lives in  New York and Vienna.

Magnum Contacts was published this month by Thames and Hudson.

Cornell Capa’s Peruvian suitcase

I spend quite a bit of time with photobooks, whether it be for this blog, it’s slightly less wordy Tumblr cousin, or just for my personal pleasure, but it is not often that I get to spend a day with a book like this one. In fact, it is not a book but a maquette for a book that was never published. Entitled Mario, it is a children’s photobook by Cornell Capa that tells the story of a young Peruvian boy named Mario. I’m not sure why it was never published but I understand that this maquette spent most of it’s life sitting on a shelf and that it has only recently resurfaced. So when I was given the opportunity to borrow the book for a day, I jumped at the opportunity.

Cornell Capa is probably best known for founding the International Center of Photography in New York in 1974 and perhaps also for being Robert Capa’s younger brother, but he was also a photographer and a member of Magnum Photos in his own right. His approach to photography was articulated in his 1968 book, The Concerned Photographer, which he described as a book of “images in which genuine human feeling predominates over commercial cynicism or disinterested formalism”. Mario is very much in line with this philosophy.

The book is made up of approximately 60 images by Cornell Capa. The photographs are predominantly black-and-white although it also includes a handful of colour images. The photographs are accompanied by a narrative written by Sam Holmes which follows a Quechuan Indian boy named Mario who dreams of going to America where he will buy a tractor for his father. The story follows Mario from his family’s simple life on the farm to his school and then on to the city of Cuzco in southeastern Peru for the Corpus Christi Festival, ending with Mario returning home. When in Cuzco, Mario happens to meet an American boy who is about the same age as him, his first encounter with the country he has been dreaming of visiting.

Although the text is clearly aimed at children, there are also some quite dense historical passages. One section deals with the richness of the ancient Inca civilization while another describes the rituals of the Corpus Christi festival. One of the most fascinating things about Mario, is that beneath the childlike language, the book has a strong political message. Returning home after his encounter with the young American during which he experiences some of the comforts of the Western consumerist lifestyle after sleeping over with his family in a hotel in Cuzco, Mario grows to appreciate the simple, ancient beauty and traditions of the rural land where he is from and his urge to travel to the city or to America fades. Today’s right-wing American cable news networks would be outraged by the book’s progressive, ‘socialist’ message.

I’m not sure exactly when the maquette for Mario was made (my guess would be in the late 1950s or 1960s), but it is an extremely interesting window onto American politics at the time and to the forthcoming interventionist American foreign policy of the 1970s. Although it is aimed at children, the book is essentially a progressive political tract… you could even go so far as to call it political propaganda.

The maquette is an interesting insight into the photobook-making process of the pre-digital era. The design is done by using a set of prints made specifically for the layout which are then stuck into the pages of the dummy book. The text is laid out in the same fashion. The design is pretty dynamic: the book doesn’t follow a ‘one-page-per-picture’ format but plays with different formats and layouts for the images. Having spent most of its life on a shelf, the prints are in excellent condition, even those in colour. As an added bonus, I have featured more images of Mario than usual as this is not a book that you are likely to be able to get your hands on.

What makes this maquette particularly exciting is that I believe that, aside from the odd exhibition catalogue, Capa did not publish any photobooks of his work. With Horacio Fernandez’s The Latin American Photobook coming out next week and Parr & Badger’s The Photobook: A History Vol. 3 — with a chapter devoted to ‘propaganda’ — currently in the making, Mario is a timely (re)discovery.

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In Focus Photography Award

Michelle Collins recently contacted me about this wonderful award….

The In Focus Photography Award is an annual educational grant of $1,000 US for eligible photography students and first year graduates. It is open to both Canadian and US students and was established in 2008.

In December of 2010, Tim Hetherington agreed to guest judge this year’s grant. Unfortunately, in April of this year, Tim was killed while covering the Libyan civil war. His death is a significant loss to his family and friends, as well as the photojournalism community. While I didn’t know Tim and hadn’t yet had the opportunity to work with him, I was reluctant to replace him on the judges panel. I’m now happy to announce that Tim’s presence will be jointly represented by his colleagues, Sebastian Junger and Christopher Anderson. I’d like to formally thank them both for their participation this year; it is greatly appreciated.

Below you will find a short bio on each of the judges who are looking forward to reviewing your submissions:

Christopher Anderson was born in Canada in 1970 and grew up in west Texas. He is a member of the renowned agency, Magnum Photos and is one of the most recognized photographers of his generation. He first gained recognition for his pictures in 1999 when he boarded a handmade, wooden boat with Haitian refugees trying to sail to America. The boat, named the Believe In God, sank in the Caribbean. The images from that journey would receive the Robert Capa Gold Medal, photojournalism’s highest honor. They would also mark the emergence of an emotionally charged style that he refers to as “experiential documentary” and has come to characterize his work since. He has served as a contract photographer for Newsweek and National Geographic Magazine photographing regions at war for much of the last decade. In recent years, his work has become intensely personal with his latest body of work, SON.

Christopher is the author of two monographs: Nonfiction, published in 2003 and CAPITOLIO, published in 2009 by RM and named one of the best photography books of 2009/10 at the Kassel Photo Book Festival in Germany. He lives in New York City.

Matthew Austin (b. 1986, Hartford, CT) is currently an artist and educator based out of Chicago, IL. He received his BFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago in 2009 and now teaches for the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Senn High School. He has recently been involved with various community projects including the ACRE Artist Residency and an experimental pedagogical project known as HomeSchool. His photographs have been exhibited widely, including exhibitions at the Catherine Edelman Gallery, NEXT: Invitational Exhibition of Emerging Art, the MDW Art Fair, and the Art Institute of Chicago’s Sullivan Galleries. He has self-published several zines and books, such as Desert Days, Wake, and Talking with Fear about Dying Tomorrow. He is currently planning his solo exhibition of Talking with Fear about Dying Tomorrow at the Riley Gallery of the University of Notre Dame which will mark the release a corresponding newsprint publication, as well as selection of images from Wake that will be exhibited at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in October 2012.

Rafael Goldchain is a second-generation Latin American Jewish artist, who was born in Santiago de Chile, lived in Jerusalem in the early 1970s, and moved to Canada in the late 1970s. He earned a Master of Fine Arts from York University (2000) and a Bachelor of Applied Arts from Ryerson Polytechnic Institute (1980), both in Toronto. In 1989, he received the Duke and Duchess of York Prize in Photography from The Canada Council for the Arts. In 2001, he accompanied Canada’s Governor General Adrienne Clarkson on official visits to Chile and Argentina.

Goldchain’s work has been published in several books, including William Ewing, Face: The New Photographic Portrait (London: Thames and Hudson, 2007) and Joan Murray, Canadian Art in the Twentieth Century (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 1999), and is the subject of two monographs: Nostalgia for an Unknown Land (Toronto: Lumiere Press, 1989) and I Am My Family (New York: Princeton Architectural Press 2008).

His photographs have been exhibited in Canada, Chile, the United States, Cuba, Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, and Mexico. His work is featured in many private and public collections including the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Portland Art Museum, and the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego.

Goldchain is currently Professor and Program Coordinator of the Applied Photography Program at Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.

Sebastian Junger is the author of three New York Times bestselling books: The Perfect Storm, Fire, and A Death In Belmont. As a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and as a contributor to ABC News, he has covered major international news stories around the world, and has been awarded the National Magazine Award and an SAIS Novartis Prize for Journalism. He has also written for such magazines as Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic Adventure, Outside and Men’s Journal.

In 1997, Junger, then a first-time author, commanded the New York Times best seller list for over three years with The Perfect Storm, which later became a major motion picture from Warner Bros. His reporting on Afghanistan in 2000, profiling Northern Alliance leader Ahmed Shah Massoud, became the subject of the National Geographic documentary “Into the Forbidden Zone”. In 2001, his experience reporting in Afghanistan led him to cover the war as a special correspondent for ABC News and Vanity Fair. In 2007 he went back, again for ABC News and Vanity Fair, as part of an ongoing series documenting a Platoon of US Soldiers in the deadly Korengal Valley during their last deployment. The professional result is twofold: his most recent book, titled WAR (Twelve, May 2010), and the Academy Award nominated documentary, Restrepo, which also won the 2010 Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival and aired on the National Geographic Channel.

Sebastian lives in New York City and on Cape Cod.

Jonathan Taggart is a photographer based in Vancouver, British Columbia, and a founding member of the Boreal Collective of Canadian photojournalists. Using critical media to explore social justice issues in Canada, he has spent the last few years working to document the challenges facing Canada’s First Nations communities, both urban and rural. His photography has been featured in the New York Times Lens Blog and Applied Arts Magazine, among others, and exhibited in Japan, the UK, and in Canada with three-time support of the Ontario Arts Council. He is a National Magazine Award nominee (Photojournalism, 2010) and spends his volunteer time as a photography instructor at Vancouver’s Urban Native Youth Association

To request an application form for the 2011 award, please contact Michelle at: [email protected]
You may also follow the grant on Facebook for further updates.

Invasion 68 Prague: Josef Koudelka – MOSCOW

© Josef Koudelka/Magnum Photos

In 1968, Josef Koudelka was thirty years old. He had committed himself to photography as a full-time career only recently, and had been chronicling the theater and the lives of gypsies, but he had never photographed a news event. That all changed on the night of August 21, when Warsaw Pact tanks invaded the city of Prague, ending the short-lived political freedom in Czechoslovakia that came to be known as the “Prague Spring.” In the midst of the turmoil of the Soviet-led invasion, Koudelka took to the streets to document this critical moment. It was a major turning point in his life

The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography in Moscow, Russia, present the exhibition of the legendary Czech photographer Josef Koudelka—“Invasion 68 Prague”—a series that not only embodies a key period of Czech history, but also has become recognized as a classic example of the photo-documentary genre. Forty years later, these photographs, which have been seen around the world, will be shown in Moscow. This is the most famous series of images by Josef Koudelka in history of photo reportage.

Koudelka’s photographs of the invasion were miraculously smuggled out of the country. A year after they reached New York, Magnum Photos distributed the images, but credited them to an unknown Czech photographer to avoid reprisals. The intensity and significance of the images earned the still-anonymous photographer the Robert Capa Award. Sixteen years passed before Koudelka could safely acknowledge authorship.

The exhibition, Invasion 68 Prague, is comprised of images personally selected by Josef Koudelka from his extensive archive, and is co-produced with Magnum Photos. Conceived as an installation, it features large-scale, ink-jet prints as well as related texts.

In August 2008, Aperture published a monograph of the same title on the occasion of the fortieth anniversary of the invasion.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by generous support from Mark and Elizabeth Levine. Additional support provided by HP and Coloredge.

Exhibition on view:
Thursday, October 7–Sunday, December 4, 2011

The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography
Marsh embankment, 3, p. 1
Moscow, Russia
(495) 228-98-78

Click here for full traveling exhibition details regarding Invasion 68 Prague.