Tag Archives: Richness

Complete short film masterpiece: La Jetée – Chris Marker (1921-2012) RIP

Chris Marker died on Sunday, his 91st birthday. Comcast NJ . elektrische verwarming . Comcast High Speed Internet . This 27-minute film is one of his best known masterpieces, but he was prolific and profound during his whole life. The film includes the original French narration, but you can choose subtitles (CC) to enjoy the richness of it in your own language.

Dave Anderson at the Center for Photography at Woodstock

© Dave Anderson

Dave Anderson has photographed in tough places—a surviving Ku Klux Klan bastion in Texas, New Orlean’s post-Katrina Ninth Ward—but his photographs are rarely gritty. His Aperture monograph One Block, which documents the rebuilding efforts of one block of Ninth Ward residents, focuses less on the neighborhood’s despair and more on its hopes for renewal. Anderson knew that to photograph amidst such hardship he would have to tread lightly: “I was super-cognizant of ‘photographers fatigue’–people were sick of photographers showing up night and day and making grand promises,” he mentioned in a Color magazine profile. That Anderson spent time living and forming relationships with the residents he photographed is evident in the work—the subjects appear at ease, comfortable sharing their struggle to rebuild with Anderson and his lens.

Anderson produces videos as well as photographs—he is the man behind Oxford American’s SoLost web series, a video exploration of “the side roads, backrooms, cellars and psyche of the modern South,” which so far features 29 four-to-seven minute mini-documentaries on subjects ranging from a couple constructing a medieval castle in Arkansas, to Alabama menswear designer Billy Reid, to photographer William Eggleston. SoLost is a one-man operation, which accounts for the easy rapport between Anderson’s camera and his subjects, and why these videos feel like privileged glimpses into the richness and diversity of life in the American South.

Anderson will give a lecture about his image-making projects at The Center for Photography at Woodstock, this Friday, July 13 at 8pm. If you’re in the area, it will be worth checking out.

›› Watch a video of Anderson speaking about One Block with Aperture, and head to the Aperture store if you’re interested in purchasing a copy.

 

Pierre Gonnord’s Relatos

Traveling the streets and country lanes of Europe, photographer Pierre Gonnord has spent the last two decades making extraordinary portraits of marginalized individuals. His subjects range from simple farmers and immigrants to monks and circus performers. A Frenchman living in Spain, Gonnord travels with a studio that gives his images a richness that speaks to a long tradition of portraiture in photography and painting. The works bear the names of the subjects, but no more detail; this has the effect of respecting each sitter’s individuality, rather than using them as representatives of a group.

Gonnord’s work will be presented for the first time in the United States in an exhibition opening on December 8 at the Hasted Kraeutler Gallery in New York. The artist titled the show “Relatos,” a word which means “narrations” or “stories” in Spanish to evoke the way he has chosen his subjects. “Under their skin,” Gonnord writes, “my contemporaries narrate unique, remarkable stories about our era. Sometimes hostile, almost always fragile and very often wounded behind the opacity of their masks, they represent specific social realities and sometimes another concept of beauty.”

Relatos is on view at Hasted Kraeutler Gallery in New York from Dec. 8-Feb. 4.

Cornelia Hediger

I have been remiss in featuring the new work of Cornelia Hediger, who currently has an exhibition at the Klompching Gallery in Brooklyn running through October 26th. Cornelia has been a long time favorite of mine,bringing a unique quality to her work through the division of space, the use of color and costume, and strong narratives.

Cornelia has recently given several terrific interviews worth exploring. They add a voice and richness to understanding the work. The first is with Robert Ayers on A Sky Filled with Shooting Stars and the second is with Ariel Body on Feature Shoot

With this newly released series of photographs, Doppelgänger II, Cornelia “continues her exploration of the uncanny, constructing complex pictorial narratives into segmented tableau vivants, consisting of up to eighteen individual photographs combined into a single composition.”

In each artwork the central characters—doppelgängers—are interwoven into a performative psychological struggle, displaying an undercurrent of the sinister, of angst and moral ambiguity. The dialogical discourse between the two central characters is superbly enacted by the artist herself, drawing comparisons in visual and conceptual strength to the work of historical photographers such as Claude Cahun.

Cornelia earned a BFA and MFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University. In college, she started as a painter but in her third year, she realized that she could express herself better through photography than through painting. Her work has been widely exhibited in the US, as well as internationally and in 2009 she was awarded a PDN’s 30: Emerging Photographers to Watch. Her photographs have been featured in New York Magazine, HotShoe, Vision Magazine, Photography Quarterly, Photo+ and Phat Photo amongst others.

Images from Doppelgänger II

Aman Mojadidi

ARTIST STATEMENT
We are all at conflict. Whether with others or ourselves, with our own ideas, thoughts, desires, history, present, future. We are all at conflict as we try and navigate ourselves through a life we understand only through our experiences, through our confrontation both internal and external with social, political, cultural, and personal strife. My visual arts work in multi-media assemblages, sculptures, 3-D collages, mise en scene photography, and installations, are always inspired by a negotiation through these conflicts, a negotiation between worlds and the multiple experiential landscapes that shape them. My recent work in particular is based largely on the dialogue between the external, contemporary experiences of conflict and the internal – mental, spiritual, and emotional – responses to it that continue to shape the understanding of my own identity and the world I live in. Through and across the different works, one can find threads of cultural tradition (be it real, imagined, invented), identity, politics, diasporas, war, and reconstruction weaving reflections, often contradictory, of humanity; a humanity which finds itself in a post-modern world that is simultaneously globalizing and fracturing, forcing us to confront each other and ourselves in ways we have yet to learn or understand. Complementing this work are my anthropological studies (B.A., M.A.) which provide a strong grounding in the debates around conflict, cultural change, post/colonialism, third-world development, and the representation of culture; while my continuing experience working and creating in Afghanistan provides the contextual richness that leads me down the path of trying to identify and understand not ways for resolving conflict, but rather ways in which we accept conflict as a life-long experience. Creating art as an aspect of, rather than response to, conflict is ultimately an exercise in dissecting the human condition in order to expose the sometimes fragile, sometimes durable, but always shifting relationships we have with each other, with ourselves, and with the conflicts we must endure throughout our lives. In order to do this, it will be necessary to see that condition as a place where external conflicts tied to global processes and internal battles tied to our own experiences are blurring into each other, becoming confused, indistinguishable, and equally personal.

BIOGRAPHY
Growing up in a war, where the bombs were 12,377 kilometers or 7,691 miles (or 6,683 nautical miles though Afghanistan is land-locked so perhaps not as relevant) away.  An Afghan-American suburban dream punctuated by weekend sleepovers, Saturday soccer games, fist-fights with racist children of the Confederate South, and religio-nationalist driven demonstrations chanting “Down with Brezhnev!”, “Long live Islam!”, “Down with Communism!”, and “Long Live Afghanistan!” before I even knew what that meant.  It is what I was fed growing up, in between southern-fried chicken and garlic mashed potatoes, cumin-scented meat and basmati rice…

In his work, Aman often uses contemporary, post-modern ideas of conflict and globalization combined with traditional narratives rooted in culture, belonging, and identity. He collects the materials and inspiration for his work from his internal and external landscapes, including growing up Afghan in the Confederate South of the United States and spending the better part of the last decade living and working in Afghanistan.

He has exhibited his work in galleries, independent spaces, and cultural centers in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Singapore, Cairo, Hong Kong, and Kabul.

Aman currently lives, works, and creates in Kabul, Afghanistan.

A Day in the Life of a Jihadi Gangster:

Out of the Conflict Bling installation emerged the character in these images, the Jihadi Gangster, as I continue to explore the idea of globalized gangster styles and iconography while exploring my own dual cultural heritage as an American-born Afghan with strong familial ties to politics in Afghanistan, including jihad.

After a Long Day's Work (A Day in the Life of a Jihadi Gangster Foto Series) edition of 5 c-print on dibond 75 x 78 cm

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183:

Inspired by real events which led to the death and disappearance of 183 family members in Afghanistan after the Soviet invasion.

183 glass bottle, plastic, anti-aircraft shell casings, 183 self-portraits 30 x 24 x 8 cm

183 glass bottle, plastic, anti-aircraft shell casings, 183 self-portraits 30 x 24 x 8 cm

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Kandahar:

The first in a line of mobile furniture for conflict environments developed by Emeric Lhuisset and Aman Mojadidi, with support from designer Pierre-Francois Dubois.

Kandahar (nomadic furniture line for belligerents) fabric, wood, steel, paper (assembly instructions) 60 x 100 x 60 cm (assembled), 70 x 10 cm (packed)

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Jihad Gangster Afghan Parliamentary Campaign:

The final culmination of the Jihadi Gangster, a faux run for Parliament in Afghanistan.

Jihad Gangster Afghan Parliamentary Campaign Poster c-print on dibond 59 x 84 cm

SLOGAN – “Vote for Me! I did Jihad and I’m Rich”
FACE – “Your favorite Jihadi Face Here”

Jihadi Gangster Afghan Parliamentary Campaign Street Installation:

Parliamentary Campaign 6 c-print edition of 10 28.5 x 42 cm

Be sure to check out Aman’s site HERE or click on any of the photos above to see more from the series.

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Archeologie de la Mine by Didier Vivien



I cannot read French so I am probably missing some of the nuances of Didier Vivien’s Archeologie de la Mine published by Marval in 1994 but it is compelling both in its photography and layout.

Archeologie de la Mine is about a major coal mine that existed in the northern region of France bordering Belgium from 1720 until its closing in 1990. It was the main source of employment for the surrounding towns which prospered because of the richness of the coal seams. It was also the site of Europe’s worst mining disaster when on March 10, 1906 an explosion killed 1100 miners.

Vivien photographed the mine and its surrounding area in a fairly non-romantic tone considering the history and expected depictions of miners as heroic men working under miserable conditions. This is a colder view more akin to the authorless topographic-style especially when Vivien moves out of the mine buildings and into the landscape of shale heaps. georgetown delaware . The book ends with images of the transition into a suburban neighborhood complete with big box stores.

Book-wise, the layout of Archeologie de la Mine is very well conceived. Simple full bleed square images – many on facing pages that create dynamic spreads. The printing is a decent, open rendering of a full range of tone but to the attentive viewer it can be seen as slightly inconsistent throughout the book. Archeologie de la Mine includes a short essay by Eric Wawrzyniak.

I hadn’t heard of Didier Vivien nor this book before discovering it by chance and I would be curious if anyone else out there had known of it. It seems like an overlooked gem to me.

Archeologie de la Mine by Didier Vivien



I cannot read French so I am probably missing some of the nuances of Didier Vivien’s Archeologie de la Mine published by Marval in 1994 but it is compelling both in its photography and layout.

Archeologie de la Mine is about a major coal mine that existed in the northern region of France bordering Belgium from 1720 until its closing in 1990. It was the main source of employment for the surrounding towns which prospered because of the richness of the coal seams. It was also the site of Europe’s worst mining disaster when on March 10, 1906 an explosion killed 1100 miners.

Vivien photographed the mine and its surrounding area in a fairly non-romantic tone considering the history and expected depictions of miners as heroic men working under miserable conditions. This is a colder view more akin to the authorless topographic-style especially when Vivien moves out of the mine buildings and into the landscape of shale heaps. The book ends with images of the transition into a suburban neighborhood complete with big box stores.

Book-wise, the layout of Archeologie de la Mine is very well conceived. Simple full bleed square images – many on facing pages that create dynamic spreads. The printing is a decent, open rendering of a full range of tone but to the attentive viewer it can be seen as slightly inconsistent throughout the book. Archeologie de la Mine includes a short essay by Eric Wawrzyniak.

I hadn’t heard of Didier Vivien nor this book before discovering it by chance and I would be curious if anyone else out there had known of it. Grand GMC Thornton . It seems like an overlooked gem to me.