Tag Archives: Richmond Virginia

Matt Licari

On October 26th, The Kiernan Gallery will host an evening for photographer, Matt Licari in his studio in Richmond, Virginia. Earlier this year, Matt unfortunately lost nearly all of his photography equipment in a robbery, so The Kiernan Gallery Presents: Matt Licari will be part fundraiser, part salon, as Matt’s
studio transforms into an alternative gallery space to display his work. I am featuring one of his series, Ride, about the experience of day to day travel on the NYC subway system.
Matt  received his BFA in photography from the School of Art +
Design at SUNY Purchase in New York. Inspired by street photography,
his work explores urban, suburban, and rural subjects. The work –
primarily in large format – has been exhibited widely, including Sasha
Wolf Gallery, Kris Graves Projects, and The Neuberger Museum of Art.
Licari has worked for the Guggenheim Museum and the Richard Avedon
Foundation, and currently serves as the Programs Chair of ASMP. He currently lives, works and travels between Richmond, Virginia and New York City. 
Ride is a series of images I have made in the New York City subway system. I’m a native New Yorker and have ridden the train since I was young, so the images didn’t start as an attempt to create a series, they were simply made in transit as I rode from place to place. I’m particularly fond of the el (elevated) lines due to the unique cityscapes they offer and the flickering, dappled light that the interior of the car receives. I also love the crowded midtown trains, where you often find every type of person in the same space. 
And of course, the elements provide another dimension to the rail system, which rarely seems to shut down even in inclement weather. It is not a conceptual series in the least – it is rather visceral – it is a place where people cram into a small space for a short time, and for the most part, deal with it quite gracefully. And then there are the people who don’t act so gracefully or ordinarily, which becomes a spectacle and sometimes a fun diversion for the rest of the travelers. The images are, in essence, about the experience of riding the train and seeing the city and it’s people through in that context. All images were made between 2008 and 2012 and are Untitled (Ride), year created.


Summer Re Runs: Kevin Thrasher

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with Kevin Thrasher.

Kevin Thrasher’s images have a wonderful combination of unsettling charm. He has a knack of finding moments and locations that while normal and natural, also leave room for alternate interpretations. Born in Birmingham, Alabama and now living in Richmond, Virginia, Kevin received his BFA from East Tennessee State University and his MFA from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. He had a long list of exhibitions in 2010 including the forthcoming Collectors Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation in NYC.

Photography seemed like the only option that I wanted to pursue in school. I wish there were a more glamorous way to talk about the choices that led me to photography, but photography was the only thing that I ever thought I really wanted to do over a lifetime. Photography made sense. Making photographs is a way for me to go out into familiar or unfamiliar places and discover things. I like going out and getting lost in a new place and making pictures there. The world is an awfully interesting place and you can make work where ever you are.

His series, Common Ground, looks at how we interact with the natural world, and the series Brown’s Island is a work in with similar themes but focusing on a specific place.

There is no pristine landscape. There is only the land that we have. We got to nature or other more socially controlled spaces to enjoy ourselves. Recreation takes us from our own backyards, to other places where we can connect with nature or experience moments of leisure.

The photographs exist in between accepted ideas of landscape and these newer more controlled spaces. People are making the best of the spaces that they have access to. Many of the locales often sustain the idea of community where people are drawn together for mutual purpose. We have come to accept these interstitial spaces as our nature.

Images from Brown’s Island

State of America: Photographing Joe Klein’s Road Trip

“The campaign is in a lull. The wars overseas are winding down. Washington is paralyzed. I’ve loaded up my iPod with some new songs. There’s nothing to do but….hit the road!”

With that, veteran TIME political columnist Joe Klein began his three-week, eight-state road trip, which ended last Friday. Klein has made this sampling of the country’s political climate a yearly tradition. This time around, TIME sent three of the magazine’s contributors to accompany Klein for different legs of the journey. Here, LightBox presents a selection of their work as well as their thoughts from across America.


What was the single most memorable experience you had on the trip?

Andrew HinderakerIn Richmond, Virginia, at a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in a Drug Rehabilitation Center, we met a woman who’d struggled with addiction since age nine. She was a convicted felon, and now, in her 40’s, was 21 months clean. She’d recently convinced a friend to allow her to farm a piece of land. For someone like her, whose addiction left her reliant on medical care most of her life, President Obama’s healthcare legislation meant for her a fresh start. With affordable healthcare, she could be a small business owner, a farmer, an active, contributing citizen; without it, she’s just a recovering addict. We learned her story because another man at the meeting expressed his disdain at the Healthcare Reform Act. We got to watch their argument, and this woman’s story change a man’s mind. It certainly proved Joe’s point about getting to know one another; perhaps the government should sponsor free coffee and organize meetings once a week with a group of local strangers.

What was the economic and political mood of the parts of the country you visited?

Katy Steinmetz: People seemed disappointed and exhausted by the political and economic state of things in America. Many were hopeful, but more were resigned—past anger and yearning for a little compromise.

What was the #1 problem facing the people you met?

Pete Pin: This was dependent on class. For a group of upper middle class voters in Charleston, West Virginia, they were most concerned with the visceral partisanship of the country and the future of the health care law. For rural voters in Jackson and Newcomerstown, Ohio, they were most concerned with jobs and social ills.

What was their #1 reason for hope?

Pete: Community at the local level. I learned that in spite of the partisanship and bickering in Washington, people genuinely believed that things can and will get better, not because of intervention by the federal government, but rather because of the community coming together at the local level.

Andrew Hinderaker for TIME

Leslie Marchut and Briggs Wesche eat breakfast with Joe Klein in Chapel Hill, N.C.

What is the national character? Are there uniquely American traits?

Pete: The singular thread I found was an overwhelming sense of self-reliance. Liberalism in the classical sense, John Stuart Mill.

AndrewEveryone likes barbeque.

Did you return from the trip more or less optimistic about the future of the country?

Andrew: Certainly more optimistic. One of the things that struck me most about the places that we visited was all the conversation. In all these pockets of America, folks more than willing, eager even, to talk and debate reach new conclusions. I don’t think it’s the impression you’d get of our citizens from watching the nightly news, but it’s something I observed in every niche.

Andrew Hinderaker is a former TIME photo intern and a photojournalist whose work has appeared in TIME, The Wall Street Journal and New York Magazine.

Pete Pin is currently the international photo intern at TIME and a photographer whose work has also appeared in The New York Times and Forbes.

Katy Steinmetz is a reporter in TIME’s Washington bureau.

Cynthia Henebry

Most of us think back to our childhoods with an idealized perspective . We remember days of innocence and bliss, days without worry, without responsibilities, backyard fun, favorite candies, and summers that seemed to stretch into infinity.  But in reality, childhood is charged with complexity.  There are periods of loneliness and insecurity, apprehension and terror. Virginia photographer Cynthia Henebry explores that side of childhood with her terrific portraits of children in a Waking State.

Cynthia might be considered somewhat of an expert to explore this terrain:
I was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1973, the first of only
2 children my parents would have together, though I later came to have 7 step
(then ex-step) siblings, and 2 half brothers, whom I still have. They are 6 and
8. 
I have 31 first cousins (44 if
you count their spouses, which I do), and approximately 2 million second
cousins. My husband and I adopted our 2 sons at birth, and we have relationships
with both of their birth families, whom we consider to be our extended family
as well. I don’t think I mentioned my in laws, who are of course my family,
too.

All of which is to say, I have a very large family, and it
is a significant part of my identity.


Cynthia is currently pursuing her MFA in photography at Virginia Commonwealth University and has exhibited in the Virginia and Philadelphia areas.
 Louisiana

Waking State: For whatever series of simple or complex reasons, I don’t remember most of my childhood, and it remains a grand and intriguing mystery to me. I take pictures of other people’s children as well as my own out of a deep curiosity to understand what might have happened to me, and also what happens to the children in my life now. What kinds of tragedies and hurts, but also what kindnesses and inner resiliencies that compensate for the way the world infringes upon us all. 

Easter Sunday
I have never subscribed to the view that children have it easier than we do- that their lives are less complicated, or their emotions any simpler. On the contrary, there is so much about the world that is out of their control, and which they are struggling to understand. At the same time, their availability to the present moment opens them up to beautiful and profound experiences every single day. 
Sophia and the conch shell
 Great grandmother’s tea party
Maggie swings
Into the woods
Consolation
The strawberry farmer’s nephew

 Bedtime

Chain link fence

 Jesse’s arms

 Mother’s braid

 Regina
 Washing the river off
Anna and Eloise