Tag Archives: Reviewers

Love The One You’re With

image by Aline Smithson

I’ve been on the road since September, visiting photo festivals across the country and I’ve been thinking a lot about the experiences and the photographers I have met and wanted to share some thoughts. I have to say, it’s an amazing community, filled with good will, curiosity, passion, and really, really good people.  I think there is something special about those who use a visual language, who are reinterpreting the world close-up and far away.  I left each event filled up with friendships, with images, with experiences that make this journey a richer one.

I have always told my students that it is equally important to meet fellow photographers at these events, and not to solely focus on meeting with people that they think might change one’s career. Sometimes at photo events, photographers can be a bit myopic and self-focused, trying to tug on the sleeve of important reviewers. They don’t realize that those who don’t make it all about themselves, benefit the most–and often times, it will be a peer that makes something happen in their career. More has come to me, and to my career, from my relationships with other photographers than from anywhere else–the evidence of this statement seems profoundly evident after my recent travels–just looking at this fall, almost every invitation came from a relationship with a photographer.

I truly marvel at how many photographers are changing the photographic landscape by giving their time and energies to promote work that is not their own. Photographer Scott B. Davis created the Medium  Festival of Photography in San Diego this September, photographer Sarah Hadley created the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago, I went to the SW Regional SPE conference, all run by photographers.  I attended Fotoweek DC started by Theo Adamstein (a photographer) and was invited to teach at the event by photographer E. Brady Robinson who I had traveled with in China.  Photographers Jennifer Shaw, Millie Fuller, and Lori Waselchuk, privotal players at PhotoNola, not only invited me to teach a workshop and review, but Jen helped me secure a gallery in New Orleans.

As I sat in the portfolio reviewing room at Photo Nola, I looked over at Blue Mitchell, a fellow photographer who started Diffusion Magazine, a publication that features historical and non-traditional ways of approaching photography, then I looked at photographer Gordon Stettinius who has not only become a publisher, but opened Candela Gallery and is working on creating a significant collection of photographs for gallery.  I looked at photographer Bryan Formhals who  champions the online community (especially Flickr) and has celebrated many image makers in his terrific LPV Magazine.

At the Medium Festival photographer Susan Burnstine found work to celebrate in her articles for Black and White Magazine (UK), photographer David Bram reviewed as editor of Fraction Magazine and in Chicago, photographer Kevin Miyazaki looked for new work for his amazing Collect.Give program and photographer Christy Karpinski reviewed for her long time publication, F Stop Magazine. Photographer Russell Joslin also reviewed for his labor of love, SHOTS Magazine which he has edited for years, photographer Bill Schwab shared his sage insights from years behind the lens and as a workshop educator and photographer Kyohei Abe reviewed for the Detroit Center of Photography where he is now the director. And there are more that I am sure I am forgetting.

I am not diminishing all the amazing curators, editors, and gallerists that make up our photography community, but I wanted to recognize the tremendous support that photographers lend to each other, often without recognition or financial compensation of any sort.

So next time you are at a photo or review event, remember that the person sitting next to you clutching their portfolio box, just might change your life one day.

Portfolio Reviews – Photomonth at the Museum of Childhood with Citizen Skwith, Daniel Alexander and Dougie Wallace


Photos above © Citizen Skwith, Petting Zoo

The same day as the Tri-pod show PV took place at the Phoenix Brighton, I did a day of portfolio reviews at the Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green for Photomonth. It’s the fourth year that I’ve done this and I’m always happy to be invited back.

I never know what to expect from the people I see and there are always some surprises, such as Citizen Skwith‘s clever signs and wonderful sense of humour (see photos above). Plus, reviewers get paid which is not always the case.

I’m posting a few iPhone photos from Photomonth’s recent portfolio reviews of some of the work that I came across, although I didn’t record all of it. If you were there and want to let people know about your work, post a comment with a link to your website/work.

So, in no particular order, here are a few projects that I saw. More from the reviews to come in another post later next week.

DANIEL ALEXANDER
Daniel Alexander says of 1day6cities project. “Today it is exactly a year on from  11.11.11 when the films were all shot. The project is also being exhibited at Oxford House until the end of this month.” This gives you all time to see it before it comes down.

1DAY6CITIES from 1day6cities on Vimeo.

“1DAY6CITIES is a global photography project that took place on the 11th November 2011 – 11.11.11, in London, Dubai, Shanghai, Auckland, San Francisco and São Paulo. Using word of mouth, email and social networks we put together an international team of photographers to create a unique twenty-four hour snapshot of this day across six very different cities around the globe. At exactly 00.00 Coordinated Universal Time (world time/GMT) photographers in each of these cities captured their first image in an event that saw photographs being taken every 30 seconds for the following 24 hours.

“The brief was for the photographers to shoot the most interesting thing happening in their city, at the time they had chosen to shoot. The cities were chosen because they are roughly an equal time difference apart meaning the films show the sun travelling around the earth through the course of the day.” The edited film is shown above and the edited stills can be seen on the 1day6cities website. There is a full list of the contributors on the website.

DOUGIE WALLACE
Dougie Wallace arrives wearing a pale blue/grey and black ensemble and carrying his colour coordinated portfolio. He smells of fish. Well, his breath does, on account of the fish pie he ate for lunch. He shows me his work, see Mumbai Rickshaw drivers shot and the Stags, Hens and Bunnies (working title) project, which is near to completion, and documents the day and night antics of hen nights and stag parties in the north.

There’s more than a hint of the Carry On about the subjects of some of these shots – all of which are well observed and captured with a wry sense of the absurd. Referring to himself as ‘The Martin Parr of the Facebook’ generation, take a look for yourself…

CITIZEN SKWITH
Citizen Skwith uses photography to document the signs that he makes and places in public places. Subverting and playing with the language of warning signs, Citizen Skwith’s works are a clever form of street art made available for everyone to enjoy. His website features all of his work and is well worth a look. I’ve already ordered the time traveller Blue Plaque for my hallway.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, street art, Visual Artists Tagged: 1day6cities, Citizen Skwith, Daniel Alexander, documentary photography, Dougie Wallace, Hens and Bunnies, london, Museum of Childhood, Petting Zoo, photomonth, portfolio reviews, Stags, stop motion, street art

Anna & Eve — When a mother and daughter grow up together [video & photo-essay]

“Anna and Eve were particularly interesting to me when I first met them in 2005 because the boundary between the child and the adult woman was blurred to an unusually high degree. This was primarily due to the mother’s young age (23); it seemed at times that she was more of a child than her 3 year-old daughter. It was often hard to tell who held the power and control between the two, and who was learning the essence of being a human in this world.”

Photographer Viktoria Sorochinski

To my mind, and to my eye, staged photography is very difficult to do well. It is so easy to fall flat, or to look unconvincing, or to seem sappy and simple-minded. carrera de fotografia . The worst of the genre falls, for me, into the mass-market cheery greeting card category, or the poorly-wrought metaphoric stock photography motivational-inspirational fantasy world of refrigerator magnets.

So, it is a complete delight to discover an artist such as Viktoria Sorochinski who soars with her staged photography that features real-life characters in fantastical settings that ring true.

Sorochinski and I met in person during portfolio reviews at Lens Culture FotoFest Paris. Her work was recognized by other reviewers in Paris, too, and it is currently being featured at the Biennale in Buenos Aires. The video above is a pitch for a book project that has yet to become a reality.

See and read more by Viktoria Sorochinski in this photo-essay in Lens Culture.

Jim Casper

Photo Tips – Portfolio reviews advice, comments and tips from photographers and reviewers

As promised yesterday, here’s the link to the PDF version of the above feature which first appeared in F2 freelance photographer magazine (Aug/Sept 2010).

I hope it helps photographers plan so that they can make the most of their precious funds and time. There are more than a few tips shared by the interviewees about planning for a review, attending the review and following up.

F2 Portfolio Review feature

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, Portfolio reviews Tagged: advice, F2, F2 freelance photographer magazine, Miranda Gavin, photography portfolio reviews, portfolio review, tips

Colombo Art Biennale 2012 Schedule of Talks and Conversations 15-19 February

Beware of the critic whose reputation depends on the power to impress the public with a semblance of knowledge, and the artist who attempts to do the same with skill and technical swagger. An artists’ perspective, see Gallery Talk 16 February Critique versus Criticism

This looks like a timely talk topic and one that’s sure to get us all thinking about our roles – as both critics/reviewers and art producers. It’s also important to challenge the taste makers and gatekeepers in the arts, especially those who like to dazzle and, sometimes, befuddle with language games and (apparent) knowledge. Also, to the artists who place technical virtuosity above all else.

As part of Hotshoe Blog supporting the Colombo Art Biennalee (CAB) 2012, the Roaming Eye (tRE) – who has been travelling off shore looking at all creatures great and small – is delighted to share the talks and conversations scheduled for the festival. It’s an exciting and interesting line up with international and local artists and curators contributing to a diverse range of topics. The schedule is still evolving, so keep checking in as relevant updates will be posted. However, The Roaming Eye will be at the biennale for the 18 and 19 February and will be reporting from the festival, talking to some of the photographers and visual artists and attending a couple of the talks on those days.

Of particular interest to readers of this blog is photojournalist, activist, writer and curator Dr Shahidul Alam from Bangladesh. The Roaming Eye hopes to do a short interview with him for the blog, so look out for it as a short podcast especially if you’re unfamiliar with his work.

It’s always good to discover new things and search for fresh perspectives – one of the hallmarks of Hotshoe and its tagline. But we’re also aware that it’s easy to say we do it but the proof is in actually getting out there and doing it – not just saying we do. Otherwise, we’re just blowing hot air. Plus, in an increasingly global world, a global approach is needed to stave of Eurocentrism and Northern-America bias in the photography and arts worlds.

See more for details of some of the scheduled talks.

Thursday 16 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “Why a Biennale?” A conversation with the BECOMING 2012 organisers.

Presented to the public by Neil Butler, UK Co-Director CAB 2012 (Keynote), Roman Berka, Suresh Jeyaram – Curators, CAB 2012, Annoushka Hempel, Festival Founder & Director, Jagath Weerasinghe, Co-Director

An introductory talk also featuring the Biennale Curators – Roman Berka and Suresh Jeyaram – to set the scope of the range of works being presented and the topics covered in Talks to come. Aimed at participating artists, students and the general public.
Venue: Park Street Hotel, Park Street, Colombo 2 (NOT TICKETED)

Session 2 – 4.00 – 6.00pm – Harry Peris, The ’43 Group and the Sapumal Foundation.

Gallery Talk – 2.00 – 3.00pm – “Critique versus Critcism”
Speaker: Leo Pasqualge, Artist BECOMING 2012.

“Beware of the critic whose reputation depends on the power to impress the public with a semblance of knowledge, and the artist who attempts to do the same with skill and technical swagger” – An artists’ perspective.
Venue: JDA Perera Gallery (NOT TICKETED)

Friday 17 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “Building Bridges – The South Asian Context”
Speaker: Suresh Jeyaram, Curator BECOMING 2012

“Sethu Samudram” is a three-year collaborative art project and a dialog-making platform between Theertha International Artists Collective, Colombo, Sri Lanka and 1Shanthi Road in Bangalore, India, bridging art, history and human relations. “Sethu Samudram” is the name of the mythical bridge found in Ramayana, meaning the bridge across the ocean. This bridge connects Sri Lanka and India.
Venue: Nuga Gama, Cinnamon Grand Hotel, Colombo 3

Saturday 18 February 2012
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “The Debate – Does great art require great skill?”

Panel: Cecil Balmond UK/Sri Lanka, Shahidul Alam, Bangladesh and Biennale artists. Dr Shahidul Alam is a world-renowned photojournalist, activist and writer from Bangladesh who will be at the festival. His profile is on the CAB website

Yes or No? an interactive debate on the benchmarks to becoming a great artist. The audience will be invited to vote.
Venue: Barefoot Gallery

Photo of Shahidul Alam

Session 2 – 2.30pm – 4.00pm – “Art as a Witness”
Speaker: Shahidul Alam, Bangladesh

Faced with imposed situations of repression, cultural activists have had to find new ways of resistance. This has required documentation, articulation and tools of creative expression to deal with injustice in many forms. By using both new and traditional media, as well as the networking ability of social media, lean and tenacious campaigns are formed that insisted on being heard and bent on achieving justice.

The presentation attempts to show how, by resisting not only the formal entities that have usurped power, but also the cultural norms that attempt to pigeon-hole cultural practice in terms of ‘fine art’, have tried to ensure that our ‘art’ does not limit itself to admiration in a gallery. It breathes the gunpowder laden air of street battles with police, the dank vapours of the factory floor and pervades the silence of patriarchal inner chamber.
Venue: Barefoot Gallery

Session 3 – 4.30pm – 6.00pm – “Art and Architecture”

Sunday 19 February
Session 1 – 11.00am – 12.30pm – “What now – after the ‘90s Trend?”
Speaker: Jagath Weerasinghe,Sri Lanka

Art of the 1990s marked a turning point in Sri Lankan modernist art. It brought in a narrative turn to the modernist art and pushed it beyond modernist aesthetics. In this presentation Jagath Weerasinghe will talk on this change and attempt at addressing the possibilities and limitations that the 90’s trend brought in.
Venue: CASA Colombo, Galle Road, Colombo 4

Session 2 – 4.00 – 5.30pm – “Art and an expanded Museum Concept”
Speaker: Roman Berka, Museum In Progress, Vienna, Austria

Daily newspapers, magazines, billboards, television, information screens, building façades or the safety curtain in the Vienna State Opera House have been used temporarily for media- and site-specific contemporary art. Outside the walls of the traditional White Cube, Museum in Progress is active in a wide-ranging social environment and is devoted to an avant-garde concept of art that includes other social systems besides the traditional artistic milieu. In this way it elaborates on the artistic concepts of the 1960s and 1970s, creating a virtual “museum of the twenty-first century” that grows in the public sphere like a social sculpture. Philosophy, science, politics and other aspects of social life are reflected in the contributions, which encourage socially relevant discussion on the basis of an expanded conception of art.
Venue: SKKY Bar, 4th Floor, 42 Sir Mohamad Macan Markar Mw., Colombo 3

Session 3 – “Art as a Social Sculpture”

Filed under: Artist Talks, Documentary photography, Photographers, Visual Artists Tagged: artist’s talks, Bangladesh, Colombo Art Biennale 2012, Colombo Art Biennial, Dr Shahidul Alam, photojournalism, Shahidul Alam, Sri Lanka, the Roaming Eye

Corden Potts Gallery: Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris

There is one week left of the Corden Potts Gallery’s terrific exhibition, Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2010 . The show will close on September 2nd. Those in the San Francisco area still have time to see the international array of images and image makers.

Jan Potts and Elizabeth Corden tell the story of house this came about: In November 2010, we had the honor of being among the reviewers for the first Lens Culture FotoFest Paris portfolio review. We met many talented artists there so we decided that a group exhibit would give you an opportunity to see work by some of them. Featured in this exhibit are: Sabine Delcour, France; Peter Eriksson, Sweden; Per Johansen, Denmark; Rubi Lebovitch, Israel; Ellen O’Connell, Switzerland; Ida Pimenoff, Finland; J. Scriba, Germany; Larry Snider, USA; and Helena van den Enden, The Netherlands.

If you are thinking about visiting Paris this fall, try to time your visit with the upcoming Lens Culture Foto Fest Paris 2011, for events, portfolio reviews, and more. You never know what might happen.

Images from Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2010

Per Johansen, Maet 4

Sabine Delcour, 09203 from the series Itsas Lurrak

Larry Snider, Burma Monk in Tree

Helena van den Enden, Blue Zone #3

J.Scriba, Escalator 5

Peter Eriksson, Nora on the Ladder from the series Penumbra

Ida Pimenoff, Untitled XXIX from the series A Shadow at the Edge of Every Moment of the Day

Rubi Lebovitch, Wool from the series Home Sweet Home

Ellen O’Connell, Figure Study 2

Corden Potts Gallery: Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris

There is one week left of the Corden Potts Gallery’s terrific exhibition, Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2010 . The show will close on September 2nd. Those in the San Francisco area still have time to see the international array of images and image makers.

Jan Potts and Elizabeth Corden tell the story of house this came about: In November 2010, we had the honor of being among the reviewers for the first Lens Culture FotoFest Paris portfolio review. We met many talented artists there so we decided that a group exhibit would give you an opportunity to see work by some of them. Featured in this exhibit are: Sabine Delcour, France; Peter Eriksson, Sweden; Per Johansen, Denmark; Rubi Lebovitch, Israel; Ellen O’Connell, Switzerland; Ida Pimenoff, Finland; J. Scriba, Germany; Larry Snider, USA; and Helena van den Enden, The Netherlands.

If you are thinking about visiting Paris this fall, try to time your visit with the upcoming Lens Culture Foto Fest Paris 2011, for events, portfolio reviews, and more. You never know what might happen.

Images from Selections from Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2010

Per Johansen, Maet 4

Sabine Delcour, 09203 from the series Itsas Lurrak

Larry Snider, Burma Monk in Tree

Helena van den Enden, Blue Zone #3

J.Scriba, Escalator 5

Peter Eriksson, Nora on the Ladder from the series Penumbra

Ida Pimenoff, Untitled XXIX from the series A Shadow at the Edge of Every Moment of the Day

Rubi Lebovitch, Wool from the series Home Sweet Home

Ellen O’Connell, Figure Study 2

FotoVisura Portfolio Consultations

Visura Media is a New York / Vermont based production and design company dedicated to the exposure and support of the international photography community. Amongst numerous projects, Visura Media created Visura Magazine and the FotoVisura.com. The organization now is producing portfolio consultations with terrific reviewers, and I have heard from fellow photographers, that these consultations are truly helpful and insightful.

The FotoVisura Portfolio Consultation is a dynamic session in which each photographer presents their work in one-on-one sessions with each of the participating editors. The goal is to assist with the preparation of a portfolio or project for formal presentation. The editorial team includes the Visura Magazine staff as well as a carefully selected group of leading photography editors and instructors. Each editor will meet with participants individually to review each portfolio as well as give consultation on any new body of work (its edit, sequence, or artists statement) and obtain any specific guidance the artist may need. Through this process, each photographer will receive a highly productive 3 hour intensive workshop with a variety of perspective and approaches from leading professionals.
For more information please contact [email protected]

Photo by Rosey Muto

DATE: Saturday, May 7th & Sunday May 8th

Morning Session: 9am – 12pm
Afternoon Session: 2pm – 5pm
Maximum Capacity: 8-10
Cost: $250.00 per session
Location: Tribeca, NY, NY 10007

REVIEWERS:
Saturday, May 7th:
Denise Wolff/ Editor, Book Program of Aperture Foundation
James Estrin/ Co-Editor of The New York Times Lens Blog and Senior Staff Photographer
Adriana Teresa/ Publisher & Editor, Visura Magazine
Graham Letorney/ Curator, 100 Words on Photography

Sunday, May 8th:
Patrick Witty/ International Picture Editor at TIME Magazine
Amber Terranova/ Photographer & Photo Editor of PDN Magazine
Adriana Teresa/ Publisher & Editor,Visura Magazine
Graham Letorney/ Curator, 100 Words on Photography

REVIEWS FROM PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

The portfolio consultations at Fotovisura are a welcome addition here in New York, and I would highly recommend them to any emerging or up and coming photographers looking to build their careers and get their work out there. At the reviews I received incredible feedback on my work, artist statement and marketing materials, direct strategic advice in how to pursue the best outlets for my photography, and even got exposure in a major publication from my consultations. The community at Fotovisura is photographer-centered and it shows, they really care about their artists, and I hope this kind of personal touch extends to all the other portfolio reviews out there in the future. John D’Agostino

FotoVisura is not simply a self- publishing platform, it is a community of peers conceived and developed by photographers for photographers. As such members are on a first name basis and there is an atmosphere of ease and relaxation underlying interactions. The FV Portfolio Consultation is an extension of this. Conversations are frank and unguarded without sacrificing intellectual rigor. Reviewers like Jim Estrin bring an immeasurable knowledge and sophistication to the act of looking; it’s a privilege to share work with them. The FV team also brings an “artist boot-camp” engagement to the sessions. They take it upon themselves to get a project ready for the public eye along several fronts: print quality, editing sequence and clarity of written statements. FV cares about its membership and their Portfolio Reviews are a testament to their satisfaction in seeing their artists grow. Jaime Permuth

The FotoVisura Portfolio Consultation was a terrific experience. I met with several knowledgeable photo editors in a casual, one-on-one setting and received valuable feedback on my work. In addition, one of the editors reviewed my project statement and gave me tips for making it better. I’m especially grateful to Adriana Teresa who has continued to give me advice after the review. Susan Falzone

I went to the December 18th FotoVisura Portfolio Consultation. It was really great, an amazingly helpful and thoughtful experience. I arrived about 10 to 15 minutes early, as suggested, which was very useful, it allowed me time to put down my things, meet the reviewers and other people before everything started. It was a small group which was nice, and we had about 30 minutes with each reviewer, just the right amount of time to really have a good conversation that really went somewhere. The other part that I thought was amazing was the choice in reviewers, each person had a different angle on the work, and came from a different place in the industry, so I really felt like I got advice and ideas from all areas. I was able to discuss everything, from presentation and writing, to the method and reasoning behind making my work. The entire environment was very comfortable, and I felt I was really able to show my pictures to people who genuinely wanted to look at them and talk about them. It was really wonderful. Bonnie Briant