Tag Archives: Refugee Camp

Matilde Gattoni: The Swallows of Syria

Editor’s note: The people in the story have been photographed with their faces covered and their names have been changed for security concerns. For the same reason, the exact locations in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon where the interviews took place have been kept hidden.

They were five, their faces covered with masks. They broke into the house and went upstairs. Few minutes later, they came down with my son Ali, handcuffed. linkwheel . They brought him away with no explanation. ‘Keep your mouth shut, or we will kill you’ was the only thing they told me.

Sitting on the porch of her new house in the Bekaa Valley, the Eastern Lebanese region bordering with Syria, Somaya struggles to hold back tears while recounting the last time she saw her son alive. Three days after his arrest, Ali’s corpse was found in a ditch near Talbiseh, a small village close to the Syrian city of Homs. He had eleven gunshot wounds in the stomach, the left arm was broken and both kneecaps had been removed, she says. Following her son’s death eight months ago, Somaya moved to Lebanon, where she is trying to cope with the nostalgia of her beloved country and the desperation of a mother that cannot get peace. Ali was a simple taxi driverhe didn’t like politics,” she says. “During the protests against the regime he used to stay at home because he didn’t want to run into troubles. Since his death, I pray to God every day to rid us of Assad.

Somaya’s story is not unique. Since the start of the revolution against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, more than one hundred thousand civilians (at least 114, 955 according to UN agencies) have taken shelter in Lebanon. According to the UNHCR, the majority are children and women. Most of them are housewives, but there are also students, teachers, retirees and widows. In order to flee from a revolution that has slowly escalated in a full-scale civil war, many have crossed the border illegally, defying the bullets of the security forces to save the lives of their children. Today, they live scattered between the Northern city of Tripoli and the myriad of small villages along the Syrian border. This war is a heavy burden on our shoulders. Many of us have lost husbands and sons, and now have to take care of their families on our own, explains 27-year-old Rasha, who fled the village of Soran on March 1 and is now hosted with her family in a stark two-room flat in the Bekaa.

Like her, tens of thousands of Syrian refugees (more than 31,095 according to the UNHCR) are still unregistered and live in desperate situations. Hosted in basements, farm sheds or tents, they survive thanks to the rare food rations delivered by local NGOs. The Lebanese government, which never signed the 1951 Geneva Convention on the Status of Refugees and does not have a specific legislation to deal with them, has so far refused to set up proper refugee camps for Syrians, out of fear that they might be infiltrated by armed groups and rebels, as was the case with the Palestinian ones in Lebanon during the 70s.

Many of the women refugees in Lebanon live halfway between prisoner and ghost, trying to avoid contacts with the local population for fear of being caught by the agents of Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shia militia and political party allied with Assad that constantly scours the country for dissidents. Every time my husband is late at night, I become hysterical, says Samira, 28, her dark, expressive eyes gleaming on her olive skin. Until six months ago she used to live in Hama with her four kids, the eldest of whom is only 11. Her husband, an opposition supporter, had already fled to Lebanon months ahead. During her lonely nights when Hama was bombed by the regime forces, Samira’s only dream was to rejoin him on the other side of the border. One night, the long-awaited phone call finally reached her. The following morning, she made an 80-kilometer trip that lasted for 13, interminable hours, during which Samira had to change four cars and pay $400 to bribe the Syrian soldiers manning the checkpoints all the way to the border. Today, Samira and her family live in the outskirts of Tripoli, but their problems are far from over. The stairs of the dilapidated building they live in are filled with pools of water and piles of garbage, while their balcony overlooks a rubbish dump. The monthly rent of $100 is a prohibitive price for her husband, who is struggling to find a job in Lebanon and is quickly running out of money. We don’t know how to pay the next rent, she says, before busting into a flood of tears.

The families who managed to reach Tripoli are the luckiest ones. Predominantly inhabited by Sunnis, the city has become the main stronghold of the Syrian opposition in Lebanon. There, refugees can enjoy proper health services and a relative security, but in the Bekaa valley, the situation is totally different. Divided among Shia, Sunnis and Christians, the region has been the theater of several raids carried out by the Syrian Army, as well as arrests and kidnappings of Syrian political activists and opponents of the regime. Hezbollah controls much of the region, and gives a hard time to refugees and the people who are helping them.

Though grateful for their safety, refugees still yearn to return to their own lives and homes. Mona, a 28-year-old refugee who escaped from al-Qusayr together with her husband and two young sons, now stays in the house of a host family all day long watching television with the kids. But the Arabic teacher has not lost the hope of going back to Syria to start teaching again. Too much blood has been spilled for freedom, she says. If the revolution succeeds, I hope the next generations will not spoil its fruits. This is the message I would like to send to my pupils.

Mona is not the only one missing school: 16-year-old Zaynab comes from the neighborhood of Al-Khaldeeye, one of the opposition strongholds in Homs. Until last January, she was the best in her class. But Zaynab’s dream of becoming a doctor was abruptly put to an end when she was forced to quit school after some soldiers kidnapped, raped and killed three of her schoolmates. Zaynab now lives in Tripoli with her father, brother and a mentally-challenged sister she has to look after. When she receives food from charity organizations, she has to sell part of it to buy her medicines. Despite the hard times she is going through, her faith in the future is still intact. I was expecting the revolution to be brief and successful,” she says. But I am still hopeful. Assad will fall soon, and we will be able to go back to Syria victorious.

Her optimism is not shared by other refugees, who are feeling the burden of the never ending clashes, deaths and deprivations. I don’t know how this war will endwe cannot even understand who is fighting whom anymore, complains Badia, a 51-year-old woman who came to Lebanon to cure her daughter who suffered brain damages during a raid of the security forces in their house in Bab Drieb, Homs. If this is the revolution, if it means that I am not able to go out of my house to buy a piece of breadthen I don’t want it. Or, as Rasha, the young Syrian girl from Soran, puts it: It doesn’t matter who wins this warSyria women don’t have rights from the day they are born. As a Syrian woman, I don’t know what freedom means.


Matilde Gattoni is a photographer based in Dubai and Lebanon. Her work often focuses on issues related to water around the world.

Matteo Fagotto is a 33-year-old freelance Italian journalist based in Dubai. He focuses on African and Middle Eastern issues through reportage and feature stories.


Alixandra Fazzina Photographs the Flight of the ‘Flowers of Afghanistan’

In 2008, photojournalist Alixandra Fazzina, who lives in Pakistan, began to stumble across stories of young Afghan refugees, children who were fleeing the country for Europe. Soon after she noticed the phenomenon, she visited a refugee camp in Afghanistan, where she witnessed the funeral of a boy who had died trying to cross from Turkey to Greece. Then, on the same visit, at a hospital, she met a boy who had lost his legs—not as she initially assumed, from a land mine, but as a consequence of having been kidnapped and tortured when trying to go west. “All the time he just kept saying he wanted to get the Europe again, despite the risks. He was just so convinced that there was absolutely no future for him as a young Afghan,” Fazzina says. The last time she saw him was in Greece, where he had again fled, the second time losing the prosthetic legs he had needed after his first attempt at emigration. “He was very lucky to survive that far, and he wasn’t done yet.”

The phenomenon that Fazzina observed first-hand was soon confirmed by statistics. The photographer noted a 64% jump in the number of underage Afghan refugees applying for asylum in Europe in 2010. With money that came that same year with her recognition by UNHCR (the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) as the first journalist to win the prestigious Nansen Refugee Award, along with the support of the Norwegian government, Fazzina began a project to document the hardships faced by young people making that journey from Afghanistan.

That project, Flowers of Afghanistan, is now about one-third completed; Fazzina is planning to continue her work in Iran, Pakistan and Italy in the coming months. “When the U.S. leaves, we’re on the brink of civil war,” she says. “It’s very important to me to be highlighting this at this point in time. It’s very important for people to realize that Afghanistan isn’t a success story.”

Although Fazzina had intended to follow the boys—and the very few girls who make the trip—along the road, photographing them, she has found that the journeys are rarely linear. Before they leave home, the boys hide their travel plans, often even from their parents; smugglers, Fazzina says, warn them that to tell will cast a jinn, a bad spirit, on their travels. And once they leave home, false starts are likely; kidnapping is frequent and deportation is a possibility even for children who seek asylum. Instead, Fazzina says she relies on networks and word of mouth, and perhaps the trust that is more easily won by a woman, to find the refugees at each stop along the way. She says that even smugglers, once they hear about her project, will reach out and provide information about their whereabouts. “Of course I want to see them traveling, but I’m not interested in photographing the smugglers themselves, so a lot of what I’ve been getting has been, in photography terms, very quiet pictures,” she says. Her photos from the series are often dark, capturing a moment of furtive rest or a person who must stay in the shadows, but stillness and gloom does not mean calm. “When I take a step back,” she says, “I often wonder if people really understand how dangerous it was.”

And the more time Fazzina has spent in that shadowy world, the clearer the patterns have become. About half the boys, she says, are fatherless due to war or sickness, thrusting them into positions of responsibility in their families. They are from the least stable provinces in the country. Recently, she met some children in Peshawar who had given up or been deported back to Afghanistan, and noticed another level of pattern. “I started to talk to them about the journey, and it was the same places, the same hotels they were held hostage in,” she says. “It’s very shocking and repetitive.”

Even though Fazzina has rarely been able to literally follow the boys she photographs, she has found that there’s a virtual way to keep track of them: through their own photographs, on Facebook. “I see a boy I’ve met and his pictures of himself in Athens, taken with fast cars and in tourist locations and in borrowed clothes, whereas the reality was he was living in a hotel, like a squat, that was being run by the smuggling mafia, full of prostitutes and drugs. It was a million miles from the pictures he showed,” she says. Unfortunately, that brave face can encourage others to try to make the dangerous journey themselves.

She once tried to make those photos that the boys take of themselves into something more true. One 16-year-old she met was passionate about photography. He was, she says, a “genius” at it. He wanted to be a filmmaker. After he survived for six days in a trucking container and arrived in Rome, Fazzina tried to get a camera to him through her colleagues in Italy. By that time he had left for Paris. They spoke by phone. He said that he had been told that he was too old when he went to a children’s home and that he was too young when he went to a refuge for adults. He was sleeping on the streets, in the winter, in the snow. She still hadn’t gotten a camera to him. He didn’t call again. “He just moved on. He disappeared. I have no idea what happened to him,” she says. “I am fearful what his fate is.”

Alixandra Fazzina is a British photojournalist. She is represented by NOOR Images and is the 2010 recipient of the UNHCR Nansen Refugee Award. More information about Flowers of Afghanistan is available here.

Inside South Sudan: Pete Muller Photographs Yida’s Refugees

In many ways, Yida is the South Sudan of popular imagination. Small Cessnas, ferrying medicine and other essential supplies, land on a tattered airstrip lined with beleaguered faces. The sprawling landscape is scorched and unforgiving. What little vegetation existed has been slashed and used by the camp’s more than 20,000 inhabitants to build basic shelters. Modest huts, made entirely of wood and thatch, dot a landscape that seems wholly unfit for human settlement.

The refugee camp in Yida rests approximately 18 miles south of the new and contested border between Sudan and South Sudan. To its north lies the embattled state of Southern Kordofan, where southern-aligned rebels wage a bitter and protracted insurgency against the northern government. In recent months, northern forces, operating under the command of Sudanese President Omar Al- Bashir, have employed brutal tactics to suppress the rebellion to no avail. An indiscriminate campaign of aerial bombardment has forced a mass exodus of Nuba civilians, more than 100,000 of whom have taken refuge in camps like Yida.

As fighting in Southern Kordofan and other adjacent border regions intensified in recent weeks, aid agencies in Yida reported a sharp rise in the number of new arrivals. Many come by foot, having walked for days to escape the high altitude bombers that have become a hallmark of the war. While Yida offers relative security, its extremely isolated location creates concern among aid agencies over their ability to provide adequate services for the rapidly swelling population. Food and water are scarce, electricity and phone networks are non-existent and political dynamics within the camp are contentious and secretive. The impending rain season threatens to turn the camp into a muddy and chaotic bastion of want and disease.

During the week I spent in Yida and neighboring camps, during which I provided visual media support for an Amnesty International research mission looking into wide-ranging human rights concerns in the area, I experienced alternating waves of inspiration and dismay. In nearly three years of covering South Sudan’s precarious transition to independence, I have yet to encounter a more welcoming, perseverant and intellectually driven community as the one I found in Yida. Despite dire circumstances, I met countless individuals who maintain an awe-inspiring thirst for education, a pursuit that many view as paramount in the battle against injustice and the marginalization of the Nuba people. Tea, coffee and assistance are offered at every turn and dignity defines the social landscape.

While their lives and aspirations have been compromised by this conflict, the mood among Yida’s refugees remains defiant. Many express support for the transformation of the Sudanese government, through forceful means if necessary, in order to bring about a system that more aptly embraces the country’s profound ethnic and racial diversity. “I ask myself why, for centuries, [the northern government] has been pushing us down,” wondered Issac Malak, a refugee from Southern Kordofan who arrived in Yida with hopes of finding employment. “There is no justice in Sudan…and I think of getting back my rights by all means that I have.”

With fighting in Southern Kordofan raging on and rains set to arrive in the coming weeks, the situation for refugees in Yida and other border camps is extremely precarious. “We pray for strength and peace,” says Abdul Rahman, a pastor in one of Yida’s six parishes. When I attended his service last Sunday, the pews of his thatch-roofed church were filled people who sang in tones that seem to put hope ahead of sorrow.

Pete Muller is a photographer based in South Sudan. He was named LightBox’s 2011 Wire Photographer of the Year. See more of his work here.

The Victims of Assad: Photographs by Peter Hapak

It was approaching midnight but many of the hundreds of Syrians who had arrived at the Reyhanli refugee camp in southern Turkey just hours before were still restless, even the toddlers. Most were concerned with where they were going to sleep that night, and if friends and family members had reached safety. It was difficult to get people to talk. Many were afraid to speak for fear of reprisals against relatives still in Syria, others were clearly physically and emotionally worn down. Nevertheless, some were prepared to share their experiences, their fears and thoughts.

TIME was granted vast access during the first week of April to the Reyhanli and Yayladagi camps in Turkish territory to document, through words and pictures, the travails of the thousands who were fleeing Syria. As photographer Peter Hapak and his assistant took portraits of several of the refugees against a white backdrop set up just beyond the tents, other residents of Reyhanli—both newcomers and those who had been there for months—swirled about.

A wiry young newlywed in a thin aqua blue zippered jacket was searching for his wife among the families milling around the cramped canvas tents. His Syrian border village of Kili in Idlib province was shelled and strafed by helicopter gunships that morning, an account repeated by many of the other refugees from the town. The 26-year-old with a thin mustache and enraged eyes was seething: “I buried a man today. Two others and me, we buried a man who had half of his head missing.” When the young man, who refused to give his name, returned to his house after the burial, his wife wasn’t there. Believing she had fled across the border, he headed for Turkey as well. “Now, I learnt from others who arrived after me that my family was behind me, that they have reached the border but haven’t crossed it yet.”

Brent Herrig for TIME

Peter Hapak photographs Syrian refugees in Reyhanli.

Like so many others in Reyhanli that night, the young man had made a perilous journey on foot through mountainous terrain to reach Turkey, guided and aided by members of the rebel Free Syrian Army along backroads and mountain trails to avoid Syrian President Bashar Assad’s troops. Some had walked for hours; others for days; most brought nothing but the clothes on their backs and harrowing tales of what they had fled. They spoke of mass killings, of homes being shelled, burnt to the ground, of relatives marched in front of tanks as human shields in the village of Taftanaz.

“Assad’s army is trying to find us, they are hunting us down in these hills to shoot and kill us,” the young man said. His group, however, was lucky. It did not encounter Assad loyalists. Just days later, a Syrian refugee was killed and several wounded after Syrian troops fired across the border at a refugee camp in the Turkish town of Kilis after a skirmish with rebel fighters. It wasn’t the first time the regime’s firepower had chased its opponents across borders into Turkey and Lebanon, but where the Lebanese government has been pliant and weak in its response to the attacks, Turkey’s patience is waning. The country already houses more than 24,000 Syrians, and is expecting thousands more.

In just one day last week, more than 2,800 Syrians streamed into Turkey from Idlib, the highest 24-hour figure to date. The exodus belied President Assad’s pledge to adhere to an internationally backed ceasefire agreement brokered by joint United Nations-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan. The deal called on Assad to withdraw his troops and heavy weaponry from besieged cities and towns by Tuesday April 10, and for both sides to cease violence. But instead of winding down, the regime’s muscle escalated operations to crush the year-long revolt.

Syria has routinely ignored diplomatic deadlines and scoffed at half-hearted international ultimatums, relying on its Russian and Chinese allies to shield it from censure. But this time, Assad’s powerful friends signed off on Annan’s initiative. His dismissiveness may yet chip away at their support, or at the very least make it harder for them to insist, as they have, that the Syrian president must be part of any diplomatic solution.

International discord is one thing. The disunity among the opposition to Assad is another. The Syrian National Council, the main opposition group in exile, remains divided and beset by claims of corruption, personal pettiness, feuds and rising suspicion that its secular leader Burhan Ghalioun is merely a front for the powerful Islamists. The nominal military leadership of the Free Syrian Army isn’t in better shape. Corralled in a camp in Apaydin, they have offered little to the men fighting and dying inside Syria in its name.

In the real struggle, within Syria, it has always been a revolution of ordinary people, of farmers and taxi drivers turned armed rebels, of students and laborers who have become community leaders. But, if the accounts of the refugees in Turkey are any indication, these revolutionaries despair of receiving the help they need to beat Assad. Early on, they had baptized their uprising a “revolution of orphans,” bereft of support. As he scurried away with a thin foam mattress tucked under his arm, one man said, “Before we thought that the world didn’t know what was happening to us, now we realize that you do and you don’t care.”

“We only have God and our own hands!” said another man, who had been standing nearby. It was a view shared by many. Said the young man searching for his wife: “Tanks we can stand in front of, we can try and stop them, stand in front of them, die as martyrs, but how can we stop a helicopter? We are now in Turkey, we don’t want to be here.” Growing more agitated, he says, “We want weapons, we want to fight… We want weapons, we want weapons, we want weapons.”

More: Syria’s Year of Chaos

Abouzeid is a Middle East correspondent for TIME. Follow her on Twitter at @raniaab.

Hapak is a contract photographer for TIME. In December of 2011, Hapak photographed The Protester, TIME’s Person of the Year. 

Displaced: The Cambodian Diaspora

As a son of the Killing Fields born in 1982 in the refugee camp to which my family had fled following the Cambodian genocide, I have struggled for most of my life to understand the legacy of my people. Over the last year, I engaged in a series of conversations with Cambodian-Americans about our history and the complexity of their experience while photographing community members in Philadelphia, Pa.; Lowell, Mass. and the Bronx, N.Y.

The Cambodian people are among the most heavily traumatized people in modern memory. They are the human aftermath of a cultural, political, and economic revolution by the Khmer Rouge that killed an estimated two million, nearly a third of the entire population, within a span of four years from 1975-1979. The entire backbone of society—educated professionals, artists, musicians and monks—were systematically executed in a brutal attempt to transform the entirety of Cambodian society to a classless rural collective of peasants. That tragedy casts a long shadow on the lives of Cambodians. It bleeds generationally, manifesting itself subtly within my own family in ways that I am only starting to fully comprehend as an adult. It is ingrained in the sorrow of my grandmother’s eyes; it is sown in the furrows of my parents’ faces. This is my inheritance; this is what it means to be Cambodian.

After surviving the Killing Fields, my family, along with hundreds of thousands of survivors, risked their lives trekking through the Khmer-Rouge-controlled jungle to reach a refugee camp in Thailand. There, my mother had what she believes to be a prophetic dream. In a field, an entire city’s worth of women were clawing with their bare hands in bloodstained dirt searching for an elusive diamond. To the disbelief of everyone in the dream, she serendipitously stumbled upon it wrapped in a blanket of dirt. The following day she discovered she was pregnant with me. The significance of this didn’t dawn on me until I started photographing this project. It was a vision of hope and renewal, that we as Cambodians are endowed with an incredible resilience and strength in human spirit. I have seen this in the faces of Cambodians I have photographed and have been incredibly humbled. In the words of my mother, it is a miracle to simply exist.

As a result of the unique demographic circumstances of the genocide, there has been a paucity of reflection within the Cambodian community. Many second-generation Cambodians I have interviewed learned about the Killing Fields through secondary sources, from the Internet and documentary films. Such conversations were non-existent at home. Exacerbating the silence is an inter-generational language barrier; most young Cambodian Americans cannot speak Khmer, the Cambodian language, while their parents and grandparents are incapable of speaking English. As a result, we are the literal manifestation of Pol Pot’s attempt to erase Cambodia’s history and culture. However, in spite of this void, there exists a growing movement of young and empowered Cambodians—academics, artists, musicians, and activists—who are trying to bridge this generational chasm.

For months, the senior surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge have been tried for crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide in Cambodia by a United-Nations-backed international tribunal that was established in 2006. Over half a decade later, and at a cost of an estimated $200 million, the court has prosecuted only one individual, Kaing Guek Eav, known as Duch, who presided over the execution of more than 16,000 in Cambodia’s most infamous prison. On Feb. 3, the tribunal extended his sentencing to life in prison. In spite of this ruling, the court is on the verge of collapse because of corruption and a lack of political will by the government to proceed beyond the trials of only the highest ranking surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge. This is heartbreaking. I asked my mother how she felt about this: she responded, almost tearfully, that this in and of itself could never take back her suffering. Many Cambodians I have spoken with in the course of photographing this project have echoed this sentiment. But I am convinced that justice and healing must emerge from the collective will of my people.

Pete Pin is a Cambodian-American documentary photographer based in Brooklyn, N.Y. He was a Fellow at the Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund, which supported the Bronx portion of his long-term project on the Cambodian diaspora. More of his work can be seen here.

Tuesday 16 August 2011

Features and Essays 

From Newsweek, or should I say Daily Beast….Russia’s far-right groups on the rise…photos by TIME contract photographer Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev: Russian Hate (Newsweek: August 2011)

John Moore: Somalia (Life.com: August 2011)

Todd Heisler’s been keeping busy…He too has been to Somalia…

Todd Heisler: Waging War in Somalia, a Country in Chaos (NYT: August 2011)

But also Norway…Do listen to his comments also…

Todd Heisler: Loss and Healing in Norway (NYT: August 2011)

More on Somalia crisis…

Sven Torfinn: Somali refugee camps in Kenya (Guardian: August 2011)

Brendan Bannon: Dadaab Refugee Camp (Boston Globe Big Picture: August 2011)

Francisco Zizola: Northern Kenya (MSNBC: August 2011) Zizola’s comments

Libya…

Francesco Giusti: In Case of Loss (TIME: July 2011) Giusti’s site

New York Times: Battle of Libya gallery

Paul Moakley: An All-Boys Roman Catholic School on Staten Island (NYT Lens: August 2011) Moakley’s site

Maureen Drennan: On a California Farm Where Marijuana  (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Irving Penn: Radical Beauty (TIME LB: August 2011)

Katie Orlinsky: Mexico’s Drug War, Feminized (NYT: August 2011)

Murray Ballard: Frozen in Time (BBC: August 2011)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund: 2011) Juarez, Mexico

Stephanie Sinclair: Bihar State India (Phaidon blog: August 2011)

Thomas Hoepker: Views of a Vanished Country (TIME LB: August 2011)

Ernst Haas: Color Corrections (TIME LB: August 2011)

Mustafah Abdulaziz: On the Road, Embracing the Distance (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Lauren Lancaster: UAE (New Yorker: August 2011)

George Steinmetz: Picturing the American Drought (TIME LB: August 2011)

Sylvia Plachy: The Pageant Winner (NYT Mag: August 2011)

Matt Lutton: Balkanization (PDN Photo of the Day: August 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Working for a Family Far Away (NOOR: August 2011)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Britain’s Discontent (New Yorker: August 2011)

Ed Smith: On These Isles (Photographer’s website: August 2011)

Gethyn Rees: Business on Migingo (Foto8: August 2011)

Lucy Clemence and Darren Karl-Smith: Anarchy in the UK (Purple.fr: 2011)

Maggie Steber: Madje has Dementia (AARP.org: August 2008) via @wemarijnissen

Interviews

Elliott Erwitt (NPR: August 2011)

Paolo Pellegrin (Wayne Ford Posterous: August 2011)

Martin Parr (Vignette Magazine: August 2011)

Bruce Gilden (Viceland: 2011)

Danny Lyon (northernarizonanews: February 2011)

Amanda Rivkin (NG radio: August 2011)

Jonathan Worth (Hungry Eye: August 2011)

Jussi Leinonen (NYT Lens: August 2011) Leinonen’s site

Articles 

photo: Anastasia Taylor-Lind

Guardian: The month in photography (Guardian: August 2011)

Guardian: Luc Delahaye turns war photography into an uncomfortable art (Guardian: August 2011)

Leon Neal: London Riots (Photographer’s blog: August 2011)

LA Weekly: David Strick, Celebrity Photographer, Suing L.A. Times For Publishing His Photos After he Left The Paper (LA Weekly: 2011)

The Jewish Chronicle: Ernst Haas: the Mad Men’s favourite photographer (Thejc.com: 2011)

Newsweek: Jerome Liebling: Chronicler of the Streets (Newsweek: August 2011)

Frenobee.com: Lenses shield 9/11 photogs as they capture history (Fresnobee.com: August 2011)

Thames&Hudson blog: Magnum Contact Sheets – Commissioning #2 (T&H blog: August 2011)

Poynter: AP, Google offer scholarships to digital journalism students

Seattle Times: White House Photo Of Dover Ceremony Sparks Controversy 

Guardian: Photographer Murray Ballard’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Guardian: Photographer Adoplhus Opara’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Amateur Photographer: Ian Berry at Berlin Wall (AP: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Matthews (Verve: August 2011)

Verve: Eric Michael Johnson (Verve: August 2011)

The Best Street Photograph Ever  (sevensevennine.com: 2011)

photo: Kevin Carter

30 Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographs From The Last 30 Years (buzzfeed.com: 2011) via @yunghi

BJP: Bringing crowdfunding to book publishing

BJP: BBC caught in Twitter copyright row 

BJP: Apple’s MacBook Air v. iPad 2: which is better for professional photographers?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Tamas Dezso

Winners of the 2011 Daylight/CDS Photo Awards

BJP International Photography Award 

People’s Choice : Summershow 2011

multiMediaHungry Eye Magazine

Talks ”Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” with David Campbell & Jon Levy August 18 on OPEN-i

Collectives – MJR : Weekly Collection 94

ServicesBob Books

Books

Questions Without Answers, a 368pp book featuring 20 yrs of world history by the VII photographers, will be published by Phaidon November 1.

Independent : Seba Kurtis: Drowned review

Photographers

Maureen Drennan

Mustafah Abdulaziz

James Mollison

Tessa Bunney

Lorenzo Meloni

Richard Sandler

Jobs

MediaStorm : Operations and Social Media Manager

Magnum Photos NY is hiring a Print Sales Manager

AP photo editor position open in Cairo

The New Yorker is seeking autumn multimedia intern : email [email protected]  or DM @dbudelis

Fast Company is looking for an intern

Red Eye is looking for a part time Events Co-ordinator based in Manchester

To finish off…

Youarenotaphotographer

and…

Stasi fashion via msnbc photoblog

Tuesday 26 July 2011

Features and Essays

Newsweek printed a selection of Tim Hetherington’s final images last week in their July 25, issue…. (You can see the tear sheets here )…and on Monday they also put some of the photos online…

Tim Hetherington: Witness to War (Newsweek: July 2011) Libya

TIME magazine published their summer double issue last Friday. Issue is filled with great photography, including work by Nga, Nahr, Kozyrev, and Addario…

Nahr has the August 1-8 double issue cover of TIME Europe,Asia&South Pacific,which run Islam theme. U.S. edition has ‘Chore Wars’ on cover, which some of the magazine’s US readers might see as dumbing down…(see the covers bigger here)…

Reminded me of when Newsweek did this back in 2006…

Lightbox has some of the summer issue photos online…Addario from Saudi Arabia…

Lynsey Addario: Travels Through Islam: In Pursuit of Romance (TIME LB: July 2011)

Nahr has been travelling through Sahara…

Dominic Nahr: Travels Through Islam, The Sands and Waters of Time (TIME LB: July 2011)

Nga reports from Dadaab…

Jehad Nga: Haven and Hell: The World’s Largest Refugee Camp (TIME LB: July 2011)

Robin Hammond: Hunger Stalks the Horn (Panos: July 2011) Saw the above photo, from a MSF feeding center in Dadaab, being used by Save The Children in their emergency appeal…printed at least in today’s Guardian…see here

Fascinating North Korea series on MSNBC by David Guttenfelder…large edit too…

David Guttenfelder: Journey into North Korea (MSNBC: July 2011)

Moises Saman went to Syria a week ago as the first western photographer to Hama for the New York Times…You can see 22 frames from the assignment on Magnum website…

Moises Saman: Syrian Dissidents (Magnum: July 2011) Interview on Lens blog

Ed Ou has been to Iraq for the International Red Cross…

Ed Ou: This is Iraq (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

Lynsey Addario: South Sudan (VII Network: July 2011)

Adam Ferguson on VII Magazine…

Adam Ferguson: War is Boring (VII Magazine: July 2011)

Larger edit of Charles Ommanney’s series on Petraeus published on Newsweek last week, is available on Reportage site…

Charles Ommanney: Change of Command (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

From this week’s Newsweek…

Ben Lowy: India’s Near Abroad (Newsweek: July 2011)

Pieter Hugo: Electronic Wasteland (Newsweek: July 2011)

Bryan Denton has left Libya again…the below was his last set of photos from the country for NYT…

Bryan Denton: Lack of Coordination Hampers Libya’s Rebels (NYT: July 2011)

Forgot to post this last week…Brent Stirton’s work in NGM August….

Brent Stirton: Malapa Fossils (NGM: August 2011)

Trevor Snapp: Sudan’s Nuba People Flee Attacks (Global Post: July 2011) More on Snapp’s archive

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan’s Climate Refugees (NOOR: July 2011)

Eric Bouvet: Shousha Refugee Camp (VII Network: July 2011)

Quite remarkable…

Jošt Franko : The Young Slovenian (TIME LB: July 2011)

Mark Redondo: New Threat on the Way North (WSJ: July 2011)

Michela Pandolfi: Morocco’s First Female Taxi Drive (Parallero Zero: July 2011)

David Degner: Cairo’s Permanent Revolution (Bagnewsnotes: July 2011) text by Alia Malek

David Gray: A Day at the Devon County Show (Foto8: July 2011)

Sarah Rice: A Place Apart (Blurb: 2011)

Interviews

PDN have put up a great series of interviews called Heroes&Mentors…

Don McCullin interview by Eugene Richards (PDN: July 2011)

Stephen Shore  interviewed by Gregory Crewdson (PDN: July 2011)

Eli Reed interviewed by Wayne Lawrence  (PDN: July 2011)

Tina Barney interview by Gillian Laub (PDN: July 2011)

Do check this out…

Peter Bouckaert/Human Rights Watch talks about lost Libyan picture archive he discovered with Tim Hetherington (Guardian: July 2011)

Micha Bar- Am (Haaretz: July 2011)

Pieter Hugo : Permanent Error (PDN: July 2011)

Chris Boot (La Lettre: July 2011)

BBC journalists reflect on the nature of war reporting (Frontline Club: July 2011)

Adam Dean and Jake Price (Vimeo: 2011)

Michael P. King (NPPA Visual Student blog: June 2011)

Daniel Cuthbert (10and5.com: July 2011)

Articles

Gilraj Singh: In The Face of Famine (Reuters photo blog: July 2011)

Related…

Guardian: Consciences awakened by the camera (Guardian: July 2011) Debates about the ethics of famine photography miss the point. By seeing pictures of suffering, we are spurred into action

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.15: Syria, social media and photojournalism (DC blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Behrouz Mehri (Guardian: July 2011)

Penny De Los Santos: A Tribute to My Mentor at National Geographic, Susan Smith (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

Martin Parr’s Best Books of the Decade (PhotoIreland Festival: July 2011)

John Stanmeyer: The Soundtrack of Assignments (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

James Hill: Artist? Journalist? Vestige? (NYT Lens: July 2011) Arles 2011

Lisa Pritchard: Ask an Agent : Writing a photography brief and clarifies a usage condundrum (LPA blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Nan Goldin’s Best Shots (Guardian: July 2011)

NYT: Georgia Frees 4 Photographers Held as Spies for Russia (NYT: July 2011)

Amateur Photographer: Icons of Photography: D Day Landing by Robert Capa (Amateur Photographer: March 2011)

David Burnett: Adieux My Flying Friends (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

BJP: The V&A Museum in London is going to open a new permanent photography gallery (BJP: July 2011)

BJP: Higher state: Photography apprenticeships as an alternative to traditional degrees (BJP: July 2011)

A Photo Editor: Cold Calling (APE: July 2011)

Chris Floyd: One hundred and forty characters (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

Verve: Ian Martin (Verve Photo: July 2011)

Videos

Do watch this if you haven’t already…Team of photographers hit the streets of London in June as part of the The London Street Photography Festival to test the policing of public and private space by security firms and their reaction to photographers…

London Street Photography: Stand Your Ground (Youtube: 2011)

Zachary Canepari and Drea Cooper: Aquadettes (Panos: July 2011)

Finding Vivian Mayer trailer

Awards and Compeitions

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2011

Picture the Difference : Photo competition raising money for Action Aid

Creative Review Photography Annual 2011

Resources

Photography and International Conflict : Resources on documentation of wars, conflicts and human rights issues (via @davidc7)

Photographers 

Nichole Sobecki

Laura Lean

Juho Kuva

Penny De Los Santos

Festivals

Who’s gonna come to Perpignan? I’m gonna be there from Sunday 28 August…

photo: Yuri Kozyrev

Teaser of Visa Pour l’Image 2011 on the festival’s website….

Agencies and Organisations

World Press Photo launched a new website

Noor newsletter July 2011

EventsHere Press Book Launch  Party : Seba Kurtis: Drowned : Cafe Oto, London : 8 August

Exhibtions 

Press Photographer’s Year 2011 exhibition open National Theatre London

To finish off…

Would you work for free? An illustrator responds… (via @Russian_Photos)