Tag Archives: Recipient

Kathleen Robbins, Me on Belle Chase

Kathleen Robbins, Me on Belle Chase

Kathleen Robbins

Me on Belle Chase,
Mississippi Delta, 2008
Website – Kathleen-Robbins.com

Born in Washington DC and raised in the Mississippi Delta, Kathleen Robbins received her BA from Millsaps College and her MFA from the University of New Mexico. Her photographs have been exhibited in venues such as The Light Factory Museum of Contemporary Photography & Film, Rayko Gallery, and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. She is represented by Jennifer Schwartz Gallery in Atlanta. In 2011, she was the recipient of the PhotoNOLA Review Prize. She currently resides in Columbia, SC, where she is an associate professor of art, coordinator of the photography program and affiliate faculty of southern studies at the University of South Carolina. 

Scott Alario, Animal Altruism

Scott Alario, Animal Altruism

Scott Alario

Animal Altruism,
Caratunk, 2010
From the Our Fable series
Website – ScottAlario.com

Scott Alario earned a BFA in photography from the Massachusetts College of Art (2006) and is currently working toward an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design (expected 2013). Alario’s work has been shown in Bloomington, Indiana, Providence, Rhode Island, and in Reykjavík, Iceland. He was the recipient of a Rhode Island State Council of the Arts Fellowship Merit Award in 2012, and selected for inclusion in “Exposure: 7 Emerging Photographers,” published in the November/December 2011 issue of Art New England. He lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.

Sarah Zamecnik, Untitled

Sarah Zamecnik, Untitled

Sarah Zamecnik

Untititled,
Syracuse, New York, 2010
From the Town & Country series
Website – SaraheZamecnik.com

Sarah Zamecnik (b. 1981), received her MFA from Syracuse University in 2011. She has been a recipient of a variety of exhibition awards and research grants and her work is part of the permanent collection at the University Wisconsin-Madison. Her Town & Country series beholds a sense of place and order, exemplifying a backdrop of the American heartland. She lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis

Old Pacific Highway,
Near Castle Rock, Washington, 2008
Website – SteveDavisPhotography.com

Steve Davis is a documentary portrait and landscape photographer. His work is in many collections, including the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Seattle Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Musee de la Photographie in Belgium. He is a former first place recipient of CENTER's Project Competition Award, and has received two Washington Arts Commission/Artist Trust Fellowships. He is represented by the James Harris Gallery, Seattle.

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer

Skogafoss,
Iceland, 2011
From the Re-creational Spaces series
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.

Stan Douglas Named the Recipient of ICP’s Infinity Award for Art

Stan Douglas has been named the recipient of the prestigious Infinity Award for Art by the International Center of Photography. Tonight, he will be presented the award at a ceremony in New York City. Douglas works in various media including video, installation and photography. Here, Lightbox visits highlights of three projects from the artist’s prolific photographic endeavors.

What is real? What is unreal? In a world where reality and history can be recreated and manipulated to appear authentic in a photograph, it is imperative that we ask these questions. We, as a society inundated with visual culture, are trained to ponder the truth and meaning behind what we see—but what if a photograph was created to question reality? To question history? Stan Douglas creates images that catalyze critical analysis and force their viewers to revisit the scenes they depict. Douglas, in creating new images of scenes in history, ponders the truth within the medium of photography and the sociological issues that lie in the passages and stories illustrated in his photographs.

Based in Vancouver, Canada, Douglas approaches each image with epic, Hollywood-level production—tapping into his history as a maker of films and video. Demanding the most active viewer who questions, challenges and investigates all that he or she sees, each image is created to excruciating detail.

Linda Chinfen; Courtesy the artist

A production photograph depicting the lighting and building of the set of Abbott & Cordova, 7 August 1971, 2008.

Courtesy the artist

A 3-dimentional rendering Abbott & Cordova, 7 August 1971, 2008.

In producing Abbott & Cordova, 7 August 1971, 2008 (slide #4), Douglas built a set to recreate a scene of the actual intersection in Vancouver. The placement of the actors in the image was pre-envisioned in three-dimensional renderings to anticipate the actual photograph. Not one detail was left unnoticed—down to the products in the dressings of the windows and the scraps of paper that lie on the streets. The mural-sized image, which was composited from 50 different images from the same shoot, is one of four in his series Crowds & Riots. All the images in the series are large scale tableaux depicting vignettes from Vancouver’s history—reflecting on matters of the police, class and social order.

Gjon Mili / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

Multiple exposure stroboscopic shot of actress and dancer Betty Bruce doing a routine for Broadway show High Kickers

In his series, Midcentury Studio, Douglas took on the identity of a photojournalist working between 1945 to 1951 (a selection of this work is represented by slides #6 – #9 in the gallery above). Inspired by imagery from this time, Douglas created images that discuss the decisive moment in photography—as Henri Cartier-Bresson explained, the exact moment that the photographer makes the photograph by firing the shutter of the camera—that very moment which is creative. Unfolding on Cartier-Bresson’s expression, Douglas constructed and carefully created these scenes to capture this experience and illustrate the scrupulous amount of information and action that lies in each frame of a photograph. In Dancer II, 1950, 2010, Douglas created an image similar to one from our own archive shot by famed photographer Gjon Mili for LIFE Magazine.

In Douglas’s most recent series, Disco Angola, most recently shown at David Zwirner Gallery in New York City in April, he once again approaches the identity of a photojournalist. This time, he is one who travels between New York City and Angola in the 1970s. Each image in the series utilizes the nature of body language as insight into the historical moment—from the pensive waiting of the Portugese colonialist awaiting evcuation (Exodus, 1975, 2012), to the interracial-intercultural array of dancing people (Club Versailles, 1974, 2012), to the group of rebel fighters performing capoeira, the Brazilian martial art that originated in Angola (Capoeira, 1974, 2012). Disco, a source of escapism for New Yorkers from the nearly bankrupt city at the time, traces its roots to Africa. Connecting these two seemingly disparate places, separated by thousands of miles of ocean and cultural-political borders, Douglas traces subtle parallels between New York’s struggles and the emerging Angolan liberation fight for independence from Portugal—one which would ultimately lead to a decades-long civil war.

Douglas’s series Midcentury Studio is currently on view at Victoria Miro Gallery in London through May 26, 2012. More information about the Infinity Awards can be found here.

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer

Sublime Settlement,
Faroe Islands, 2011
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.

Steve Davis, Richard & Ron

Steve Davis, Richard & Ron

Steve Davis

Richard & Ron,
Buckley, Washington, 2006
Website – SteveDavisPhotography.com

Steve Davis is a documentary portrait and landscape photographer. His work is in many collections, including the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Seattle Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Musee de la Photographie in Belgium. He is a former first place recipient of CENTER's Project Competition Award, and has received two Washington Arts Commission/Artist Trust Fellowships. He is represented by the James Harris Gallery, Seattle.