Tag Archives: Random

Aphotostudent Update

Aphotostudent is currently on hiatus but please enjoy the archived posts.

Please feel free to follow me in my other online hang-outs:

twitter: @jamespomerantz

instagram: jamespomerantz

The New Yorker magazine’s Photo Booth 





A Photo Student Update

Shsssssshhhhh aphotostudent.com is sleeping.

But you can find me at The New Yorker’s Photo Booth or hanging out at http://jamespomerantz.tumblr.com




Winner of the T-shirt design contest

Yes we have a winner… and the T-shirt will be going into production by next week. The entire production will take about four weeks, that’s when I’ll be able to ship your T-shirt to your doorstep. For those that want to make sure to get a copy; I’ll be starting pre-sale as of tomorrow. Through PayPal you’ll be able to order and pay your limited edition T-shirt (100 copies). This time we have chosen a black Fruit of the Loom Heavy Pocket T-shirt. The front print will be on the pocket and the back print will be large. The sizes available will be from small all the way to XXL. Each size has a very limited amount of T’s.
The winning T-shirt, and thus the T-shirt that will be going into production, is designed by Kristiaan Passchier. (www.behance.net/SlinkyStyles/frame)

The other designs (of which two will be printed as A6 stickers and send to you with the T-shirt) are the following (in random order):

Number 2: Nicole Gelinas (www.nicolegelinas.net)
Number 3: Tóth Bence
Number 4: Francesco Gadaleta (www.gadaleta.org)
Number 5: Toth Cosmin

I’d like to thank all the participants for their designs and hope that you are as excited about the winning design as I am.
PS: New photographers are coming up in the near, near future.

Andres Gonzalez – Somewhere


Andres Gonzalez was on a seemingly ideal photo trajectory. He was selected for the PDN 30 class of 2006 and was a 2007-2008 Fulbright Fellow. His clients included Newsweek, Monocle and Time. But not everything was sunny and f16

This series started soon after I left the photo agency I was with about a year and a half ago. They had submitted a series I made in Ukraine to an Italian magazine, and when I translated the text I found that they had rewritten some of my statement to give it a newsy slant. That really made me angry and soon after that I decided to leave the agency. It pretty much amounted to wanting more control over my work and how it was presented. That was the catalyst that pushed me to start putting this project together. The idea of storytelling has always been problematic for me, especially after moving abroad. For a long time I forced myself to tell other people’s stories because thats what journalists are supposed to do. Now I really just want to learn to see through my own eyes, to find my center and find a balance between being intentional and being open to the world. Looking for pictures has always been a form of meditation and I want my work to reflect that. Maybe that’s a bit soft, or perhaps even self-indulgent but thats really what I’m looking for. I love how quiet the world gets when you engage in deep observation. There is a loneliness there and I’m intrigued by that kind of beauty. I guess I want to believe there is room for everything.


The passenger steps out onto the overcast deck and remembers a line. Soft was the sun. The wind to his back, he is facing the stern and an endless trail of thoughts drifting away from him towards the horizon. He wants no words, only to enjoy the delicate anticipation of a moment waiting to reveal itself. What are the limits of language? This is the mind, felt, not spoken. He makes a photograph of a seagull, and does not resist the emotion that brings.

There is a town passing by on the starboard side of the ship, the mind-boggling, awe-inspiring, crazy-making, world of people. He is happy for the distance, but knows that the idea of separation is an illusion. Everything exists according to the laws of nature. There is a core, it seems. The sea turns grey for a moment, the lights from the town slowly dimming, overtaken by fog. He makes another photograph of the fading light, the soft presence of time. The ship begins to slow, ahead a port, another journey.

Andres Gonzalez spends most of his time in Istanbul, Turkey but is spending Fall 2011 teaching at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine.


Photographs of Agony – John Berger

The possible contradictions of the war photograph now become apparent. It is generally assumed that its purpose is to awaken concern. The most extreme examples – as in McCullin’s work – show moments of agony in order to extort maximum concern. Such moments, whether photographed or not, are discontinuous with all other moments. They exist by themselves. But the reader who has been arrested by the photograph may tend to feel this discontinuity as his own personal moral inadequacy…

The US Marine Counteroffensive, Day Nine. Don McCullin

Read the rest of Berger’s “Photographs of Agony” here, along with a few other chapters from About Looking which you should buy if you don’t already own.


Submissions for Aphotostudent are Always Welcome

If you’re a photographer with a new body of work to show or if you’re a photography fan who has a new photo crush, you’re always welcome to submit it for posting on Aphotostudent. The majority of the posts on here for the past two years have showcased the work of world-renowned photographers. I’d like to devote more time to showcasing new work from emerging artists, but I need your help to do it.

Photo For The Week: Yamaguchi-san Peeling Chestnuts, 2008. James Luckett

Ways to reach me:

1: Feel free to email me at [email protected] but please write “aphotostudent submission” or something similar in the subject line so I don’t confuse it with the many requests for help I receive from Nigerian Royalty with millions of dollars stuck in limbo.

Please include a little bit about yourself and the body of work in the email. A bit of context always helps.


2: Head over to my Facebook page and post a comment on the most recent call for work.

Pretty simple!

Thank you in advance for any submissions you send. And, my apologies if I don’t reply to your submission right away. Sometimes emails stack up. It’s nothing personal.

I look forward to seeing lots of amazing work! – James Pomerantz