Tag Archives: Public Collections

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren

Running 005824,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

SW Regional SPE: Vivian Keulards

Sharing photographers that I met at the SW Regional SPE Conference hosted by the Center of Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado….

Meeting Vivian Keulards in Colorado was a complete pleasure and her wonderful projects set the tone for a new friendship and fan club. It’s hard not to respond to an image like the one below, simply a portrait of a neighbor, but obviously there was more to the story from her series, 80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe

And then there was her adoration of redheads, in her series, Elusive Beauty…

Vivian was born and raised in the Netherlands and currently lives in Evergreen, Colorado. In 2009 she received a degree from the Photo Academy in Amsterdam and she gained a Master Degree in Communication Science at the KUN University (Nijmegen, Netherlands). She also participated in inspiring Master classes of Carl de Keyzer, Rob Hornstra and more.

Vivian was a Critical Mass finalist and she was selected for the NEW Dutch Photography Talent book (by the makers of the magazine GUP) this year. Her work is part of several public collections and the work has been exhibitied widely.  Six of her portraits from the series Elusive Beauty are currently on display at the Ogden Museum in New Orleans and her  project 80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe will open in January 2013 as a solo exhibition at CPAC in Denver.

Elusive Beauty 

They will likely be extinct in the next 100 years: red headed children. Only one percent of the human population carries this unique red head gene. 


 For years now those children take my breath away; the orange/red hair, their pale skin with clusters of freckles and their bright light eyes. At times they even seem to be translucent. When they look into my eyes I’m staggered. Sometimes I even feel intimidated. Their fragile and sensitive appearance is often accompanied by their very powerful and strong willed character. I experienced it myself and this surprising combination makes them even more exclusive to me.

I know by saying this all out loud, a lot of them feel offended. They don’t want to be examined as special, different or exotic. And they don’t want to be generalized, stereo-typed or even fetishized. They are a group with a history of bullying, discrimination and abuse, all because of their looks. So I understand their skepticism towards me.

In my photos I create scenery where their strong looks come to life and capture the moment where you can feel their power. I desperately want to show that red hair is admirable and desirable, instead of a reason to be treated differently.

80439, Bloody Mary and Sloppy Joe

In 2010, I moved from The Netherlands to Evergreen, Colorado, for three years. My new home environment is very different, confusing, and intriguing at the same time. Of course I grew up with watching American movies, shows, and videoclips. And of course, in real life up here, I sometimes recognize similar places and people from those fiction scenes. In truth it feels like I’m living in a constructed reality show – the fiction and the reality confuse me. More important, I fear my new life will fade like a dream when I go back home…that all this will be forgotten. 

John Blakemore at the Klompching Gallery

A wonderful exhibition featuring the work of British photographer, John Blakemore, has recently opened at the Klompching Gallery in Brooklyn and will run through December 22nd, 2012.
John is considered a national treasure of Britain with a career that spans 55 year years and a mastery of not only his photography and his craft in printing, but in his “knowing” of a subject.  He is concerned with the “ritual of intimacy, the sustained exploration of small areas of the world that interests him–whether working outside in the landscape or working in his studio. His work is held in public collections around the world and he has exhibited in a numerous international museums and galleries.
John has been fascinated with the idea of exploring landscape as a manifestation of energy, and the metaphoric potential of the photograph. His exquisite silver gelatin prints are a testimony to the excellence of his hand as an artist.  He shows us that a photograph is not taken, it’s made.  

Tulipa – After Jan Van Os (printed 2012)
Tulipa – Dissections No. 10 (1992)

The Garden – Fragments of a History (1991)

Ambergate Derybhsire from the ‘Lila’ series (1977)

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren

Running 004907,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Edie Bresler

The subject of luck and money is always an intriguing one.  The mix of judgement, fascination, and a sliver of hope are a combination worth exploring. Boston photographer, Edie Bresler is doing just that with the lottery culture and her series (in progress), Lottery Economies.

Edie received a BFA in Photography from the School of Visual Arts and an MFA from the Art Institute of Boston. She was recently awarded an artist in residency at The Boston Center for the Arts beginning Spring 2013. Her solo exhibits include The Griffin Museum of Photography, the Visual Studies Workshop, and CEPA. She has been included in numerous group exhibitions in the United States, Canada and the Middle East and her photographs are featured in public collections such as the Houston Museum of Fine Art, The Whitehead Institute, and Fidelity Bank. Edie also writes for Photograph magazine, covering exhibitions and photo-related happenings in the greater Boston area. Edie is on the faculty of Simmons College in Boston, where she teaches photography and digital imaging. 

Lottery Economies 

 As the economy continues to stagnate and income disparities widen, communities across America grow more dependent on state lotteries to cover budget shortfalls. $70 billion is spent annually in North America on the lottery, which is more than the total spent on movies, music and porn combined. In the US, 44 states operate lotteries and Massachusetts has the highest per capita lottery spending in the nation ($807/ adult). Aggressive media coverage paid for by the state, typically highlights big winners and annual revenues generated for education and other essential services, but finding tangible effects in communities is illusive.




Azores Discount Tobacco located in a one-family house in Fall River, MA. They sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket in 2011 and the owner received a $10,000 bonus commission.

 I focus on archetypal lottery stories not part of the usual hyperbole. A lot of these stories happen in small family-run convenience stores and marketplaces where lottery tickets are sold, and where the big money sometimes trickles down. Owners are a diverse cross-section of the community. Some are recent immigrants but others have operated their small store for decades.


Fast Freddie’s located in Wakefield, MA sold the first winning $10,000,000 scratch ticket, which in 2009 was the largest payout for a scratch ticket in the nation. The store received a $50,000 bonus commission. 



The lottery is an endemic part of their business or as one vendor put it, “a store without lottery is like a bar without alcohol.” After selling a winning ticket, stores become known as lucky and the resulting happiness contagion creates brisk sales we all benefit from whether you play the lottery or not. Owners receive a 1% bonus commission but each state has its own designated maximum payout. I photograph winning stores during the fleeting moments of twilight to evoke the tenuous seduction of hope and desire that accompanies the purchase of every ticket.


Located in Hull, MA, this family-run marketplace sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket in 2011 and received a $10,000 bonus commission.

Steve is the fourth generation of his family to operate Coulson’s News in Albany NY, which has been open for business since 1895. In March 2011 they sold a winning MegaMillions ticket worth $319 million. So far this is the largest jackpot won by a single ticket in the games history. An office pool of 7 workers who were all regular customers shared the money. Steve received the maximum bonus commission, which in NY State is $10,000.

In March 2012, the jackpot for MegaMillions reached a record $640 million. One of three winning tickets was sold in this store located in the town of Red Bud, Illinois (pop. 3683). FKG Oil, a corporation that owns 73 other stores, received the maximum bonus commission, which in Illinois is $500,000. In an unusual gesture they gifted $50,000 to the 7 workers at the store.


Denise, the manager at Motomart received a small share of the $500,000 bonus commission. With her $25,000 windfall she was able to purchase a bassoon for her husband, a retired member of the Air Force band. “We tried to get a bank loan several years ago but were turned down.”

Darla, a regular player, sold the winning MegaMillions ticket in March 2012 at Motomart. As assistant manager she received a bonus commission of $12,500. When the other 7 clerks in the store found out they had to split the remaining $12,500 bonus, 3 of them quit in protest. “Money changes people.”


Frank and Rafaella DiFonzo own and operate Bill’s Food Shop, the oldest family-run convenience store in Somerville, MA. Frank points to a photograph of his father who helped him buy the shop. They raised three children in the apartment above the store. After 54 years in business they have never sold a big winning ticket.


Ed and Nancy have been in the convenience store business for over 25 years. They currently operate four stores in rural communities in central Maine. Theirs is a family business where all three children lend a hand after school and on vacations. Kate is a college junior, Nick recently enlisted in the Army and Matt is a star athlete at the local high school.


The owner is the third generation of his family to work this small shop located in Randolph, MA. He sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket in 2010 and received a $10,000 bonus commission. Eight years earlier he sold a winning $4,000,000 scratch ticket and received a $40,000 bonus. His customers consider Minihan’s a lucky store.


Harry Patel with his family inside Jay’s located in Lowell, MA. He sold two winning $1,000,000 scratch tickets in the last 5 years and the customers in the surrounding neighborhood consider his store very lucky.


Amar Ramadan, proprietor of Neighborhood Market located in Somerville, MA. He sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket in 2001 and used the $10,000 bonus commission to put a down payment on a house nearby where he still lives with his wife and two daughters.


Peter Wong with his youngest son is the proprietor of S&R Market located in Sheepshead Bay Brooklyn, NY. He makes origami sculptures with the discarded lottery tickets his customers leave behind.


Cassie’s Corner Store, a family-run business in Canton, MA sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket and received a $10,000 bonus commission.


Tony is a ticket hunter. He collects discarded tickets from the trash of neighborhood stores looking for winners that were inadvertently thrown away. “Some weeks I make as much as $250.”

Elizabeth is a reformed scratch ticket addict who used to spend as much as $100 each week on tickets: “I was convinced it would solve all my problems.”Located in Brockton, MA, they sold a winning $1,000,000 scratch ticket in 2010 and received a $10,000 bonus commission. Wally Markham always said if he ever won the lottery he would use the money to purchase and revitalize his favorite local golf course located in La Porte City Iowa (pop. 2321). When he won $10 million dollars on a scratch ticket in 2012 he made good on that promise and the course is once again the center of this small Iowa community.

Rafael Goldchain

I discovered Rafael Goldchain’s wonderful self-portraits in a recent Lenswork Magazine. Rafael is a Chilean-Canadian Jewish artist, who was born in Santiago de Chile, lived in Jerusalem in the early 1970s, and moved to Canada in the late 1970s. He has created an amazing series of photographs bases on memories, family and fiction, which was published in 2008 by Princeton Architectural Press.

Rafael received a MFA from York University and a Bachelor of Applied Arts from Ryerson University, both in Toronto. He has garnered numerous awards including the Duke and Duchess of York Prize in Photography from The Canada Council for the Arts. His photographs have been exhibited across Canada, Chile, the United States, Cuba, Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, and Mexico. His work is featured in many private and public collections including the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Portland Art Museum, and the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego.

Goldchain is currently Professor and Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Arts – Photography at Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.


 I Am My Family is an autobiographical exhibition that features digitally altered self-portrait photographs. It suggests that grounding an identity within a familial and cultural history that has been subject to erasure, geographic displacement, and cultural dislocation involves a process of gathering and connecting scattered fragments of past familial history while at the same time acknowledging the impossibility of complete retrieval. 
Self-Portrait as
Motl Yosef Goldszajn Liberman
b.
Warszawa, Poland 1902
d. Santiago de Chile, 1959

The self-portraits in I Am My Family are detailed reenactments of ancestral figures that can be thought of as acts of “naming” linked to mourning and remembrance. I Am My Family proposes a language of mourning through self-portraiture and through the conventions of family portrait photography. In reenacting ancestors through a relationship of genetic resemblance, and through the conventions of the portrait photograph, the self-portraits in I Am My Family suggest that we look at family photographs in order to recognize ourselves in the photographic trace left by the ancestral other.

Self-Portrait as Josef Liberman 
B. Warsaw, Poland early 1890s
D. Poland, early 1940s

I Am My Family is the product of a process that started several years ago when my son was born. I slowly realized that my role as parent included the responsibility to pass on to my son a familial and cultural inheritance, and that such inheritance would need to be gathered and delivered gradually in a manner appropriate to his age. My attempts at historical story-telling, cultural and familial, public and private, made me acutely aware of how much I knew of the former, and how little of the latter. I thought of the many erasures that family history is subject to, and of the way in which my South American and Jewish educations privileged public histories. As I reached my middle years it became important to not only retrieve basic historical facts such as family names, dates, and genealogical relations, but also to reach towards the world of my ancestors as a basic foundation of an identity that I could pass on to my son. While I could access the considerable existing stores of knowledge of Eastern European Jewish life, knowledge of the pre-Holocaust lives of my grandparents and their families only exists in fragments deeply buried within the memories of elderly relatives.

Self-Portrait as Luzer Goldstein 
B. Poland, early 1900s
D. Buenos Aires, Argentina 1960s

I Am My Family explores the relations
amongst family portraiture, mourning and remembrance, notions of history,
memory, and of justice and inheritance. Just as I am the carrier of memories
and ancestral history fragments through whom the familial past is brought up
into the present (for my son to carry into the future), the self-portraits in I Am My Family visually articulate a
process of identity representation through which ancestral figures take on my likeness
as they become visible (while at the same time remaining concealed behind my
features and behind the conventions of the portrait photograph) to serve as a
reminder of the unavoidable work of inheritance. These images are the result of
a reconstructive process that acknowledges its own limitations in that the
construction of an image of the past unavoidably involves a mixture of
fragmented memory, artifice, and invention, and that this mixture necessarily
evolves as it is transmitted from generation to generation.

Self-Portrait as Szmul Goldstein
B. Poland, early 1900s
D. Buenos Aires, Argentina 1960s

Self-Portrait as Edmund Precelman 
B. Poland 1890s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self-Portrait as Don Marcos José Goldchain Liberman
B. Warsaw, Poland 1902
D. Santiago de Chile
Self Portrait as Malka Ryten
b.
Lublin, Poland, 1884
d. Tel-Aviv, Israel, 1974
Self
Portrait as Mojszes Precelman (older)
b.
Poland, 1880’s
d. Poland, early 1940’s




Self-Portrait as Don Mauricio Goldchain Precelman
B. Montevideo, Uruguay 1925
D. Wshington D.C., USA 2007
Self Portrait as Pola Baumfeld
b.
Ostrowiec, Poland
d. Poland, early 1940’s
Self-Portrait as Zyndel Baumfeld
B. Ostrowiec, Poland 1880s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self-Portrait as Roize Krongold
B. Ostrowiec, Poland 1880s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self
Portrait as Naftuli Goldszajn
b.
Krasnik, Poland, early 1800’s

d. Krasnik, Poland, late 1800’s

Self-Portrait as Rachelle Goldszajn
B. Warsaw, Poland, early 1900s
D. Poland, early 1940s




Self-Portrait as Pesia Krongold
B. Poland, 1860s
D. Poland, 1930s

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson is drawn to the idea of migration, of immigration, of lives recreated and born again in a new place. Though he was born in Dudley, United Kingdom, much of his own family moved from the Caribbean to the UK in the post-war migration, a subject that he explored in his project, From a Small Island. His new project, Everything Bad is Good for Something, examines migration from Eastern Europe.


Andrew completed an MA in Documentary Photography at Newport (University of Wales) and has since embarked on both commissioned and personal works. These works have sought to examine our emotional responses both to the spaces that surround us but also to the emotional spaces that exist between ourselves and others.His work is held in both private and public collections and he was recently nominated for the Prix Pictet photography Prize. 


Everything Bad is Good for Something
Michele Wolfson cites that “…in the transitioning from one geographical place to another, participants related moving into a psychological in-between space. In this space, they questioned, re-examined, and reflected on the meaning of who they had been [before] repositioning themselves in new contexts.” 
In 2004, the European Union enlarged its membership to include the so-called A8 Eastern European Countries: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Hungary, Poland, Lithuania, Slovakia and Slovenia. This led to Britain’s largest ever wave of immigration into the country as an estimated 1 million people left their home countries in Eastern Europe and came to Britain. 

This work is about one of those who made that journey.
Marcela Janosikova left her village of 2000 people, just outside of Bratislava, in Slovakia; and travelled for 26 hours by coach in June 2005 to come to England – without knowing a word of English. To eventually find a life in a tower block in an economically deprived area of England called Walsall. 
This England, though, would not be the same England found in Marcela’s dreams. There would be no Buckingham Palace and no soldiers in red tunics and bearskins changing the guard in this corner of England, there would only be work and the isolation from those who thought she had come to steal their jobs. 

Marcela is absent from the images in this series to symbolise the ways in which, within indigenous populations, migrant identities are as much imagined as they are real. Instead, the family which she has left behind and the migrant husband, who she has found here, are revealed within her spaces in England. 
These are the spaces that, as alluded to earlier, stand in for, ‘[her] psychological in-between space’ where the past and the present and who she was, and who she hoped to become in England, all exist at the same time. 
And yet we still do not see her. 

In addition to the sample images, shown here, the series is accompanied by a fictional narrative which further examines and heightens the feeling of estrangement found within her transitioning from that which she has left behind to that which she had hoped to find. 

Albrecht Tübke, Untitled

Albrecht Tübke, Untitled

Albrecht Tübke

Untitled,
Italy, 2008
From the Heads series
Website – Tuebke.info

Albrecht Tübke is one of the most celebrated young photographers at work today in Europe. Several of Tübkes recent series of portraiture appear at once strikingly innovative and deceptively simple. Originally from Leipzig, Germany, Tübke trained at the Academy of Visual Arts, Leipzig before completing his MA at Guildhall University of London. His work has been included in numerous prestigious exhibitions in Europe, among others Animalism at the National Media Museum in Bradford, How We Are: Photographing Britain at the Tate Britain, Zeit, Raum, Bild at the Historisches Museum Frankfurt, and New Photographers 2006 at Antwerp’s Museum voor Fotografie. His work can be seen in the public collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, La Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris, Museum Folkwang, Essen, Centre National de l’Audiovisuel, Luxembourg and the National Media Museum, Bradford.