Tag Archives: Protesters

RNC In Pictures: The Protests

Tropical Storm Isaac led organizers to cancel Monday’s lineup at the Republican National Convention, but protests in Tampa went ahead mostly as planned. Some protesters even camped out in the rain on a rented lot, dubbed “Romneyville.” Some met up with a larger group of several hundred activists and “Occupiers,” who marched one mile from Perry Harvey Park to the Tampa Bay Times Forum, where Republican delegates are gathering this week. Hoisting placards and chanting slogans, protesters from as far as California registered their disapproval of the GOP ticket throughout the day. Security was intense. Photographer Grant Cornett was on scene to capture the scene.

Adam Sorensen is an Associate Editor at TIME covering politics.

Grant Cornett is a New York City-based photographer. LightBox previously featured his photography in Beautiful Decay.

Pictures of the Week: May 11 – May 18

From violence in Colombia and a huge fire in Manila to soccer championships across Europe and the presidential handover ceremony in France, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week, January 27 – February 3

From deadly clashes in Syria and Egypt, to the first anniversary of the Tahrir square uprising and the walk-up to this year’s Super Bowl, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

On the Campaign Trail with Newt Gingrich

I arrived in Charlotte, N.C. early on the day of the South Carolina primary and headed straight to Tommy’s Ham House in Greenville. Newt Gingrich was giving an electrifying speech inside as a crowd milled around outside. The previous week I’d covered my first presidential primary in New Hampshire, where many events were disrupted by attention seekers and protesters. Occupy Wall Street supporters came to a Mitt Romney rally and were quickly thrown out by police. At a Ron Paul event, a man with a boot on his head named Vermin Supreme made chicken noises and claimed that if he were elected president, every American would get a pony.

South Carolina was more restrained. There were no active protesters. A lone Ron Paul supporter kept a silent vigil a respectful distance away. Tommy’s Ham House continued to serve breakfast. I didn’t try their famous ham, but their hot cakes were excellent. Gingrich left in a bus with a giant portrait of his face emblazoned on the side. It started pouring and the crowd hid under signs that read, ‘Newt 2012. Rebuilding the America We Love.’

Next, Gingrich stopped at a nearby middle school serving as a voting station. He patiently shook every hand of the assembled crowd, numbering close to a hundred. There were only a few journalists, compared to New Hampshire, where the media often ringed the candidates three or four deep.

One of the last stops of the day was a Gingrich campaign gathering at a Chick-fil-A in Anderson. Like most Gingrich events, it was packed to the brim, with supporters pressing their faces against the restaurant’s windows to get a peek. Sometimes the event locations seemed arbitrary. Why a Chick-fil-A, which was founded in Georgia, instead of a locally-owned business? Another journalist speculated it was because of the widely-promoted Christian values of its founder, Truett Cathy. All the candidates were trying to woo the evangelical base, and nearly everyone at the event was caucasian.

Gingrich would beat Romney to win the South Carolina primary that evening. The victory party that night was restrained, though 1970s and 1980s rock-and-roll classics blared in the packed ballroom. There were a few brief speeches before Gingrich arrived to thank his supporters and attack Barack Obama. Most of the attendees left immediately after the speech was over. I asked where everyone was going and was told the private parties would continue deep into the night.

Peter van Agtmael is a photographer represented by Magnum. His work from Iraq won a World Press Photo award in 2007. More of his work can be seen here.

The Protester: A Portfolio by Peter Hapak

Ahmed Harara is a dentist. While protesting during the Egyptian revolution in January, he was struck in the eye by a rubber bullet. Blinded in that eye, he continued to protest. Then, during the November protests in Tahrir Square, Ahmed was shot in his other eye by a rubber bullet. Now he is completely blind.

But he kept protesting.

Harara is one of more than a hundred protesters around the world photographed by TIME contract photographer Peter Hapak. From Oakland, Calif., to New York City, across Europe and through the Middle East, Hapak and I traveled nearly 25,000 miles photographing protesters and activists from eight countries.

We photographed protesters representing Occupy Wall Street, Occupy Oakland, Occupy the Hood, Los Indignados of Spain, protesters in Greece, revolutionaries in Tunisia and Egypt, activists from Syria fleeing persecution, a crusader fighting corruption in India, Tea Party activists from New York, a renowned poet turned protester from Mexico and a protester from Wisconsin who carries a shovel, topped by a flag.

We set up makeshift studios in hotel rooms, apartments and people’s homes, inside a temple in rural India and an anarchist headquarters in Athens — even in the courtyard of the home of Mannoubia Bouazizi, the mother of Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi. Tear gas wafted into our studio in a hotel room overlooking Tahrir Square — the same room where Yuri Kozyrev made a now iconic photograph of the crowd.

Each time, we asked subjects to bring with them mementos of protest. Rami Jarrah, a Syrian activist who fled to Cairo, brought his battered iPhone. He showed me some of the most intense protest footage I’ve ever seen. A Spanish protester named Stephane Grueso brought his iPhone too, referring to it as a “weapon.” Young Egyptian protesters brought rubber pellets that had been fired at them by security forces. Another brought a spent tear-gas canister. Subjects carried signs, flags and gas masks (some industrial ones, some homemade, like the one belonging to Egyptian graffiti artist El Teneen — his was made from a Pepsi can). A trio of Greek protesters brought Maalox. (Mixed with water, it was sprayed on their eyes to counter the harsh effects of tear gas.) Molly Katchpole, the young woman from Washington, D.C., who took on Bank of America — and won — brought her chopped-up debit card. Sayda al-Manahe brought a framed photograph of her son Hilme, a young Tunisian killed by police during the revolution. El Général, the Tunisian revolutionary rapper, brought nothing but his voice — he rapped a cappella for us (we have video). Lina Ben Mhenni, a blogger from Tunisia and a Nobel Peace Prize contender, brought her laptop. She spoke Arabic, yet we understood the words Facebook and Twitter.

Each subject was photographed in front of a white or black background — eliminating their environments but elevating their commonality to that of “Protester,” a fitting setup for a group of people united by a common desire for change.

“They were all unhappy. They wanted change, and they wanted a better life,” Hapak said. “Everybody is out there to unite their power for one common cause, one common expression: to get a better life.”

Witty is the international picture editor at TIME.

Hapak is a contract photographer for TIME, who most recently photographed Tilda Swinton for the Dec. 19, 2011, issue.

MORE: See the entire 2011 Person of the Year package here

Pictures of the Week, November 18–25

From renewed riots in Egypt and Saif al-Islam Gaddafi’s capture to the pepper spray outrage at University of California-Davis and the Kabaddi World Cup, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

See last week’s Pictures of the Week.

The Prevalence of Pepper Spray in Protests

Nothing disperses a crowd like a shot of chili pepper to the eye. Pepper spray—scientifically known as oleoresin capsicum spray—is banned in war but has made its presence known during the Occupy Wall Street protests as one of the most-used methods of crowd control. Its status as a less-than-lethal weapon gives police the right to use pepper spray as a tactic to tame rowdy protesters, but are they using it properly? A number of incidents have called attention to the liberal usage of the spray against protesters appearing both defenseless and peaceful. But a quick burst of the orange is enough to bring even the hardiest protester to his or her knees: the active ingredient, capsaicin, inflames eyes, penetrates skin, and irritates mucous membranes. And the symptoms can last for days. Here, TIME looks at the prevalence of pepper spray in recent protests.

Nick Carbone is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @nickcarbone

Taking It to the Streets

The Occupy Wall Street movement has, at times, been chaotic. During an Oct. 1 march across the Brooklyn Bridge, more than 700 people were arrested. On Oct. 15, when protesters took over Times Square, two policeman were injured as the NYPD had to use horses to bash barricades back into place when protesters tried to push through them. I was ever so skeptical when I first met photographer Sasha Bezzubov. I had seen his extraordinary work, so I didn’t doubt his ability for a second, but I knew how chaotic the protests could become.

In my short career as a working journalist, I’ve had the pleasure of working mostly with combat photographers like Kadir van Lohuizen and Erin Trieb. Combat photographers move quickly—shooting, ducking, shifting and shooting again. Somehow they make sense of chaos, and great beauty develops out of their constant motion.

Sasha shoots on film from a tripod, and I knew that he would take great photos, but I knew it would involve some crowd control. Sasha, known for his portrait typologies of travelers and adventurers, shot some extraordinary portraits in his two days at Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street’s base camp. His subjects were a perfect anthropological study of the people who populate the movement: the old and the young, the employed and the searching, the curious and the erudite. As the sun began to set on the first day, Sasha ran out from the crowd and said he had seen a woman holding a bird. He asked me to see if we could take her portrait. She had the most piercing eyes, and I knew Sasha would take an excellent photograph. It turns out that the woman was the one seen on YouTube by more than a million people falling screaming to her knees, after a police commander sprayed pepper in her face. We had been writing about her for a week and only then found out who she was.

Sasha Bezzubov for TIME

Kaylee Dedrick, activist. October 7, 2011

That was one of the treasures to come out of working with Sasha. The rest are shown here. And for the record, the bird survived and, a few days later, flew away.

Sasha Bezzubov is a Brooklyn based photographer. Facts on the Ground, an exhibition by Bezzubov and his collaborator Jessica Sucher is on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York through October 22. More of his work can be seen here.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings. Continue the discussion on TIME‘s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.