Tag Archives: Prison Photography

Interviews and Talks | October 2012

VII Photo’s International Director Nick Papadopoulos shared practical advice  for young photographers at a Canon talk in Perpignan… Canon Professional Network put the main points on their website… Includes good tips also from some of the VII members…Worth reading  by photographers young and old in my opinion…

Nick Papadopoulos (VII) : practical advice for young photographers (CPN)

Really good hour long talk Lynsey Addario gave at Side Gallery in Newcastle earlier this autumn…

Lynsey Addario (Side Gallery Vimeo) Lynsey Addario discussing her photographic practice and ‘Veiled Rebellion’ exhibiton at Side Gallery, which looks at the lives of women in Afghanistan. | 55mins

Prison Photography’s Pete Brook interviewed VII photographers who shot for the agency’s and NYC based advocacy group Think Outside The Cell’s collaborative project…

Ed Kashi   (Prison Photography)

Ron Haviv  (Prison Photography)

Ashley Gilbertson (Prison Photography)

Jessica Dimmock  (Prison Photography)

Stephanie Sinclair on NBC photoblog on her child brides project

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair (NBC)

Stephanie Sinclair (World Press Photo on Vimeo)

Ron Haviv (WBEZ on Soundcloud)

Joachim Ladefoged (Digital Pro Photo magazine)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Emaho Magazine)

Gary Knight and co talked about their Bosnia book in Perpignan… CPN shares the points on their site…

Gary Knight, Jon Jones, Tom Stoddart and Rémy Ourdan revisit Bosnia (CPN)

Peter Turnley (YouTube)

Pete Souza (MSNBC)

Teun Voeten interviewed about his book Narco Estado on the BBC World Service (Panos)

Terric talk by David Burnett at PhotoShelter’s recent Luminance event.

David Burnett (PhotoShelter)

Jeremy Bowen (Guardian)

Reuters photographers Jorge Silva and Carlos Garcia Rawlins on photographing Hugo Chavez (YouTube)

Donna Ferrato interview in burn magazine…

Conversation with Donna Ferrato (Burn)

Alessio Romenzi (LA Times Framework blog)

Katrin Koenning (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Peter diCampo : Everyday Africa (NYT Lens)

Poulomi Basu (Theworld.org)

David LaChapelle (PDN)

Phaidon interviewed Peter van Agtmael relating to his W. Eugene Smith Grant awarded project Disco Night September 11…

Ten Questions for photographer Peter van Agtmael (Phaidon)

Mark Power : From Poland, With Love (themuse.com)

Steve McCurry video, on location in Ethiopia (Phaidon)

Bruce Gilden (ASX)

Jake Chessum (A Photo Editor)

Video interview with William Klein to coincide with his exhibition at Tate Modern in London…

William Klein (Youtube)

Daido Moriyama (Youtube)

Simon Baker, the Tate Modern’s Curator of  Photography and International Art on William Klein + Daido Moriyama: Double Feature (Lightbox)

Susan Bright (YouTube)

Good Simon Norfolk interview…I don’t always agree with what he says,  but I do like the fact he doesn’t mince any words…

Photo © Simon Norfolk. From the project “Burke + Norfolk”

Simon Norfolk (FK Magazine)

Joel Meyerowitz (Youtube)

A Conversation with Richard Misrach and Kate Orff : Petrochemical America (Aperture)

Alejandro Cartagena (A Photo Editor)

Interview with Jason Eskenazi on “Wonderland: A Fairytale of the Soviet Monolith” – A 10-Year Odyssey Around the Former Soviet Union (erickimphotography)

A Conversation with Danny Wilcox Frazier on Facing Change: Documenting America (Leica blog)

The National photo blog has been a great find…

AP photographer Manu Brabo talks about his time in Syria and covering conflicts (The National)

Daniel Etter : Witnessing Syria’s Descent Into War (Newsweek Photo Dept Tumblr)

A conversation with Neville Elder-Photographer and Film-maker (Broadbentius blog)

Ewen Spencer in Guardian’s ‘best shot’ series…

Photo © Ewen Spencer

Ewen Spencer’s best photograph: MCs at a UK garage rave (Guardian)

Ewen Spencer (BBC)

Dana Popa (Photo Parley blog)

Photo © Franco Pagetti

Franco Pagetti – From Fashion to the Frontline (Emaho Magazine)

Sebastian Rich : From war zones, photographer brings scars and searing images (NBC)

Teru Kuwayama (PhoNar)

Benjamin Chesterton (PhoNar)

Victor Cobo (Foam)

Niall McDiarmid (Document Scotland)

Maroeskja Lavigne (Word Magazine)

Martin Parr introducing us to his new book…

Martin Parr presents Life’s a Beach (Aperture Vimeo)

Photo Raw magazine’s video interview with Parr…

Martin Parr (Photo Raw)

Alec Soth (LayFlat.org)

Simon Roberts (YouTube)

Danfung Dennis (YouTube)

Brian Smith: Secrets of Great Portrait Photography (PhotoShelter webinar)

Brian Smith on How to Take Better Portraits (B&H blog)

I don’t consider myself a gearhead, but I do sometimes enjoy reading about what others have in their bags…

John Stanmeyer : What’s The Kit (Photographer’s blog)

From Photo Brigade…

In My Bags – by Robert Caplin (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Dominick Reuter (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Matt Eich (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Eric Thayer (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by Keith Bedford (Photo Brigade)

David Bailey‘s India: the long click goodbye (Guardian)

Interview with Maciej Dakowicz on his “Cardiff After Dark” book Published by Thames & Hudson (erickimphotography)

Maciej Dakowicz (BBC)

Jim Mortram’s Small Town Inertia (BBC)

Tom Wood (BBC)

Tom Wood (Guardian)

Laia Abril on the Fabrica Artist Residency (PDN)

Mario Testino interview: the man who makes models super (Guardian)

Mikhail Baryshnikov (NYT Lens)

Cruel and Unusual @ Noorderlicht

© YANA PAYUSOVA - Holy Trinity - Holy Ghost, 2004

© YANA PAYUSOVA – Holy Trinity – Holy Ghost, 2004

The Cruel and Unusual exhibition that opens at the Noorderlicht Gallery in Groningen tomorrow is a rare breed. This is a project that started out (and still lives) on the internet, became a road trip across America, and is now both a newspaper and an exhibition. With work by eleven different artists, Araminta de Clermont, Amy Elkins, Alyse Emdur, Christiane Feser, Jane Lindsay, Deborah Luster, Nathalie Mohadjer, Yana Payusova, Lizzie Sadin and Lori Waselchuk, the exhibition focuses on prison photography, a subject that receives very little exposure. The show is co-curated by fellow photo-bloggers Hester Keijser (Mrs Deane) and Pete Brook (Prison Photography) who write two of the most dynamic and esoteric blogs that you will find on the web (aside from the dozens of other writing, curating and photographic projects). To state the obvious, prisons are not exactly a sexy subject and the fact that they have managed to put this show together is very impressive. Instead of a ‘traditional’ exhibition catalogue, the curators have put together a newspaper (print run of 4,000 / 1.50 € per copy) in an attempt to reach more readers than an expensive photobook could (they lay out their reasons for this choice in detail here). The world of photography online can be an exasperating, sprawling mess, but the fact that it can lead to projects such as this one makes it genuinely worthwhile. I’m providing a few visuals of the work on show with this post, but if you can make it to Noorderlicht before the exhibition closes on 1 April, don’t miss this.

© AMY ELKINS - 6/44 (Not the Man I Once Was)

© AMY ELKINS – 6/44 (Not the Man I Once Was)

 

© CHRISTIANE FESER

© CHRISTIANE FESER

© NATHALIE MOHADJER - Detention cell in Muyinga, Burundi 2009

© NATHALIE MOHADJER – Detention cell in Muyinga, Burundi 2009

© ALYSE EMDUR - Anonymous Backdrop Painted in Shawangunk Correctional Facility, New York 2005- 2011

© ALYSE EMDUR – Anonymous Backdrop Painted in Shawangunk Correctional Facility, New York 2005- 2011

 

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Pete Brook and Prison Photography

Pete Brook is not a photographer. He’s an intelligent voice in the blog and magazine sphere, who writes a thoughtful photography blog, Prison Photography, exploring incarceration and prison reform around the world. He also writes about photography for Wired Magazine’s Raw File, and recently interviewed Elizabeth Avedon for his new interview column “Raw Meet.

Image by Victor Blue

I consider Pete a friend–we connected awhile back through our blogs and I want very much to support him in his efforts to dig deeper into the cause and result of a life behind bars. “We must stop warehousing people and be creative with rehabilitation. Prisons in the US are socially and economically unsustainable. As they exist, prisons are a liability … and they are ignored. Problems also exist in other countries.” Pete makes us look at the closed-off corners of our world that we’d prefer to ignore or not address, and he is relentless in his passion for this subject.

He has created a Kickstarter campaign: Prison Photography-on-the-road-stories behind the photographs, so he can hit the highway, connect with photographers who are looking at prisoners and prisons, conduct some interviews, and bring attention to this subject. Please consider supporting him in this venture.

Prison Photography’ on the Road is a journalism project. I will conduct over 40 audio interviews, publish them online and make them available to the prison reform and photography communities free of charge via Creative Commons licensing. My writing during the trip will also be CC licensed. I’m doing the legwork so others can enjoy the ride and use the results.

Image by Lori Waselchuk

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about photography. I’ll be meeting the most creative and celebrated photographers who, through their work in prisons, have shaped America’s visual culture and the debate on U.S. criminal justice.



Interviewees include:

Jenn Ackerman, award winning photographer for Trapped

Adam Amengual, commercial and documentary photographer

Victor Blue, seasoned photojournalist specialising in social and political story telling

Lloyd Degrane, commercial and documentary prisons, known for his series Prison

Amy Elkins, fine art photographer working on collaborative project with death row prisoners

Harvey Finkle, social documentary photographer

Tim Gruber, fine art and documentary photographer known for his series Served Out

Bruce Jackson, photographer and SUNY James Agee Professor of American Culture

Lou Jones, known for his death row portraits

Brenda Ann Kenneally, documentary photographer who focuses on women families and marginalised communities

Sean Kernan, documentary photographer of the series In Prison

Jon Lowenstein, NOOR member and award winning photojournalist

Deborah Luster, fine art photographer

Danny Lyon, pioneering documentary photographer

Frank McMains, photographer of multiple prison stories in Louisiana

Ara Oshagan, award winning documentary photographer known for Juvies

Mona Reeder, Dallas Morning News photojournalist, Robert F. Kennedy Award and Hillman Prize for Photojournalism winner

Joseph Rodriguez, documentary photographer, social activist, ICP instructor

Richard Ross, Guggenheim recipient and photographer

Jamel Shabazz, photographer, teacher, retired prison guard

Adam Shemper, psychotherapist and photographer

Jan Sturmann, documentary photographer

Stephen Tourlentes, professor and fine art photographer

Lori Waselchuk, documentary photographer

Max Whittaker, photojournalist and Prime Collective founder

Sye Williams,commercial photographer and gadfly

Taro Yamasaki, Pulitzer prize winner for photojournalism

Image by Steve Davis

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about prisons. I’ll be meeting some of the leading thinkers in prison arts, prison education, law and advocacy. Including, Rebecca Ginsburg of the Educational Justice Project, representatives of the Southern Poverty Law Center, folk at The Innocence Project and those working with juveniles and for re-entry programmes. I hope desperately to talk to Department of Corrections officials in some of the larger States.

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about education. I’ll deliver the lecture ‘American Prisons: Photography in the Era of Mass Incarceration’ to half a dozen colleges. Through the people I meet on the road, I hope to access prisons and jails to deliver the same material.

Image by Adam Amenguel

WHY?

U.S. prisons are under incredible pressures from all sides. Politicians have continually used tough on crime rhetoric to win votes, but longer sentences and the correctional philosophy of “incapacitation” has bloated prisons and not reduced rates of recidivism (which in the U.S. are higher than those of other countries). Prison education budgets have been slashed and felon disenfranchisement laws often place a released prisoner in a worse position to succeed than when they went in. Some public are fearful, some are in the dark, but either way their tax dollars are at work to continue inefficient practices.

The U.S. prison population has quadrupled in the past 35 years.

Today, 1 in every 100 U.S. adults is imprisoned.

At 2.3 million individuals incarcerated, the U.S. imprisons people at a rate six times that of the next most punitive Western nation, the United Kingdom

Women have suffered proportionally the most, with a near eight-fold increase in U.S. the number of U.S. female prisoners in the past 35 years.

The U.S. prison system disproportionately punishes poor people and minority groups.

Only the current economic crisis has brought about serious scrutiny of prison spending. Moves toward more sensible and effective non-custodial sentences as well as early release for non-violent or geriatric prisoners are steps in the right direction.

Now is a good moment to take stock, think about our culture and how it’s policies may move toward social justice imperatives.



Image by Jenn Ackerman

WHERE?

San Francisco, Oakland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Minneapolis, Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Rochester, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Charlottesville, Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, Jackson, New Orleans, Houston, Austin, Dallas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Phoenix, Los Angeles … and places in between.



Image by Sean Kernan

YOUR DONATION

Funds will be used to buy gas for 8,000 miles (I’ve got a small car with good MPG) and food for 12 weeks (I am not a picky eater, nor do I have expensive tastes!), an audio recorder (I already have the microphone), three oil changes and a few road tolls.

Between now and the new year, I’ll be working diligently to connect with non-profit organisations who can benefit from using the material created. The project may last 12 weeks, but the long-tail of content will be used in perpetuity.

Pete Brook and Prison Photography

Pete Brook is not a photographer. He’s an intelligent voice in the blog and magazine sphere, who writes a thoughtful photography blog, Prison Photography, exploring incarceration and prison reform around the world. He also writes about photography for Wired Magazine’s Raw File, and recently interviewed Elizabeth Avedon for his new interview column “Raw Meet.

Image by Victor Blue

I consider Pete a friend–we connected awhile back through our blogs and I want very much to support him in his efforts to dig deeper into the cause and result of a life behind bars. “We must stop warehousing people and be creative with rehabilitation. Prisons in the US are socially and economically unsustainable. As they exist, prisons are a liability … and they are ignored. Problems also exist in other countries.” Pete makes us look at the closed-off corners of our world that we’d prefer to ignore or not address, and he is relentless in his passion for this subject.

He has created a Kickstarter campaign: Prison Photography-on-the-road-stories behind the photographs, so he can hit the highway, connect with photographers who are looking at prisoners and prisons, conduct some interviews, and bring attention to this subject. Please consider supporting him in this venture.

Prison Photography’ on the Road is a journalism project. I will conduct over 40 audio interviews, publish them online and make them available to the prison reform and photography communities free of charge via Creative Commons licensing. My writing during the trip will also be CC licensed. I’m doing the legwork so others can enjoy the ride and use the results.

Image by Lori Waselchuk

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about photography. I’ll be meeting the most creative and celebrated photographers who, through their work in prisons, have shaped America’s visual culture and the debate on U.S. criminal justice.



Interviewees include:

Jenn Ackerman, award winning photographer for Trapped

Adam Amengual, commercial and documentary photographer

Victor Blue, seasoned photojournalist specialising in social and political story telling

Lloyd Degrane, commercial and documentary prisons, known for his series Prison

Amy Elkins, fine art photographer working on collaborative project with death row prisoners

Harvey Finkle, social documentary photographer

Tim Gruber, fine art and documentary photographer known for his series Served Out

Bruce Jackson, photographer and SUNY James Agee Professor of American Culture

Lou Jones, known for his death row portraits

Brenda Ann Kenneally, documentary photographer who focuses on women families and marginalised communities

Sean Kernan, documentary photographer of the series In Prison

Jon Lowenstein, NOOR member and award winning photojournalist

Deborah Luster, fine art photographer

Danny Lyon, pioneering documentary photographer

Frank McMains, photographer of multiple prison stories in Louisiana

Ara Oshagan, award winning documentary photographer known for Juvies

Mona Reeder, Dallas Morning News photojournalist, Robert F. Kennedy Award and Hillman Prize for Photojournalism winner

Joseph Rodriguez, documentary photographer, social activist, ICP instructor

Richard Ross, Guggenheim recipient and photographer

Jamel Shabazz, photographer, teacher, retired prison guard

Adam Shemper, psychotherapist and photographer

Jan Sturmann, documentary photographer

Stephen Tourlentes, professor and fine art photographer

Lori Waselchuk, documentary photographer

Max Whittaker, photojournalist and Prime Collective founder

Sye Williams,commercial photographer and gadfly

Taro Yamasaki, Pulitzer prize winner for photojournalism

Image by Steve Davis

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about prisons. I’ll be meeting some of the leading thinkers in prison arts, prison education, law and advocacy. Including, Rebecca Ginsburg of the Educational Justice Project, representatives of the Southern Poverty Law Center, folk at The Innocence Project and those working with juveniles and for re-entry programmes. I hope desperately to talk to Department of Corrections officials in some of the larger States.

‘Prison Photography’ on the Road is about education. I’ll deliver the lecture ‘American Prisons: Photography in the Era of Mass Incarceration’ to half a dozen colleges. Through the people I meet on the road, I hope to access prisons and jails to deliver the same material.

Image by Adam Amenguel

WHY?

U.S. prisons are under incredible pressures from all sides. Politicians have continually used tough on crime rhetoric to win votes, but longer sentences and the correctional philosophy of “incapacitation” has bloated prisons and not reduced rates of recidivism (which in the U.S. are higher than those of other countries). Prison education budgets have been slashed and felon disenfranchisement laws often place a released prisoner in a worse position to succeed than when they went in. Some public are fearful, some are in the dark, but either way their tax dollars are at work to continue inefficient practices.

The U.S. prison population has quadrupled in the past 35 years.

Today, 1 in every 100 U.S. adults is imprisoned.

At 2.3 million individuals incarcerated, the U.S. imprisons people at a rate six times that of the next most punitive Western nation, the United Kingdom

Women have suffered proportionally the most, with a near eight-fold increase in U.S. the number of U.S. female prisoners in the past 35 years.

The U.S. prison system disproportionately punishes poor people and minority groups.

Only the current economic crisis has brought about serious scrutiny of prison spending. Moves toward more sensible and effective non-custodial sentences as well as early release for non-violent or geriatric prisoners are steps in the right direction.

Now is a good moment to take stock, think about our culture and how it’s policies may move toward social justice imperatives.



Image by Jenn Ackerman

WHERE?

San Francisco, Oakland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Minneapolis, Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, Buffalo, Rochester, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Charlottesville, Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery, Jackson, New Orleans, Houston, Austin, Dallas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Flagstaff, Phoenix, Los Angeles … and places in between.



Image by Sean Kernan

YOUR DONATION

Funds will be used to buy gas for 8,000 miles (I’ve got a small car with good MPG) and food for 12 weeks (I am not a picky eater, nor do I have expensive tastes!), an audio recorder (I already have the microphone), three oil changes and a few road tolls.

Between now and the new year, I’ll be working diligently to connect with non-profit organisations who can benefit from using the material created. The project may last 12 weeks, but the long-tail of content will be used in perpetuity.

Jehad Nga talks to Pete Brook about Professional Insecurities and Libyan Detention

Pete Brook of Prison Photography and Raw File has a great interview with Jehad Nga that covers everything from the insecurities that come with being a working photographer to Jehad’s detention while covering the uprising in Libya.

jehad nga photo from Something In The Way
From the series "Something In The Way" – Jehad Nga

If you look at my website, you’d think, “Here’s a photographer whose confident and secure in his work.” On a good day it’s a complete mess, but I am very happy with the mess. Dilemmas are hard and can break the spirit but they bring on just decisions about your work.

Jehad Nga

Head over to Raw File to read the interview. Go!

 

Posted by James Pomerantz

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Just as Google launches, Google+, it’s latest attempt at a social network and an attempt to lure people away from Facebook, I thought I would share a piece that I have written for the latest issue of European Photography (which comes out today) that deals with the impact of blogs and social networks on the way we consume and understand photography. If you are interested in looking further into the online photography world I also recommend checking out the previous issue of European Photography (no. 88) on ‘Net Photography’ which investigates some of the trends in photography that is being produced specifically for and distributed through the web.

Blogs have always been fragile creatures: statistics show that around 70% of them die within their first month. And now, only a decade after they first appeared, some are concerned that they are becoming an endangered species. While I am relatively new to blogging (I started eyecurious in April 2009), even in my short virtual lifetime a lot has changed. Particularly in the last year, a significant part of the online activity relating to photography has moved to online social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. So are we witnessing the demise of the blog? As with most of these dichotomous debates linked to technology (printed versus digital books, analog versus digital photography, etc.) I think the question is not so much whether (or when) the new will kill off the old, but rather how they are influencing each other. More specifically, what impact is the rise of social networks having on the online conversation on photography?

In a recent piece Andy Adams summarised the impact of blogs and social networks as follows, “web 2.0 is influencing contemporary photo culture around the world by connecting international audiences to art experiences, enabling the discovery of new work and presenting never-before-seen channels of expression and communication.” Blogs, webzines and now social networks have made photography far more accessible than before. We are no longer dependent on museums, galleries and books for photographic content. This not only makes it cheaper and easier to get our hands on photographs, but we can now see far more images than are available through these ‘traditional’ forms. The web makes it just as easy to access photographs being made outside our front door as on the other side of the globe, as well as work that has yet to be exhibited or published and often never will.

What truly characterises web 2.0 however is participation: the opportunity for everyone to share information and to get involved in a conversation. Although I think the internet is at its best when it creates discussion and debate, the vast majority of online activity still centres around the dissemination of information. Even within a tiny universe such as the ‘fine art photography’ (for want of a better term) community, the accessibility of the web quickly leads to an overwhelming amount of photographic content. Blogs, online magazines and increasingly social networks act as filters, allowing people to more easily find the content that most interests them. Social networks have further refined this process, not only making it easier to find the kind of photography we want, but also providing a platform on which to have a conversation around photographs. These networks create spaces for discussion around specific topics or fields of interest that just aren’t possible on the infinite plain of the broader world wide web.

So what is the downside? Most of us would agree that better access and more conversation sounds like a pretty good thing. However, while these online developments have been leading to more conversation, I would argue that they have also been making it more shallow. Take the example of Facebook. While the platform does allow for discussion, the structure of the Facebook platform is such that we are constantly being asked to like things, whether it be through ‘Fan Pages’ or simply by choosing to ‘Like’ something that someone else has posted. While I don’t think a ‘Dislike’ button would add anything to the quality of the online conversation, it would at least remind us that our reactions to photography don’t all have to be situated on scale running from good to awesome.

Twitter is a slightly different beast. With its 140-character limit, the network is intrinsically suited to point towards existing information rather than to create new content. Even in the case where a conversation develops between several users (‘tweet chats’ in the local jargon), the medium is entirely focused on immediacy and not on considered opinion. By the time you have finished reading a tweet there are already several others that have appeared in your Twitter feed demanding your attention.

The reason this matters to photography is that it can lead to a situation where we are constantly consuming and never digesting. The danger with the infinite accessibility of the web is that we can find ourselves only looking at photographs that are immediately seductive or simply popular in the networks around us. Work that might be deemed quiet, challenging or even just off-putting can get totally bypassed. Moreover, if our interaction with photography is limited to a ‘Like’ button or the 140-character equivalent, we run the risk of never getting beyond the surface of images and of not developing an understanding of why we like or dislike something. Given the demise of arts criticism in traditional media, this kind of critical thought is arguably more important than ever.

Fortunately there are many online examples that buck the trend. Blogs like Pete Brook’s Prison Photography and Beierle + Keijser’s Mrs Deane are endless sources of hidden gems and considered discussion of current photographic trends. Perhaps the two most encouraging examples are Charlotte Cotton’s 2008 Words Without Pictures and more recently, Foam’s What’s Next?, both vital spaces which use the participatory nature of the net for considered thought and conversation on what is happening in photography today and where this might be leading.

Some might argue that an overly analytical discussion of photographs can get in the way of images. But without a critical discussion, what is going to lead photography to evolve and move forward?

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